HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Dawah
Da‘wah (also daawa or daawah; Arabic: دعوة‎ "invitation") is the proselytizing or preaching of Islam.Contents1 Etymology 2 Early Islam 3 During Muhammad's era3.1 Post-Muhammad4 Purpose 5 Proselytism 6 Proselytizing methods6.1 Gentleness 6.2 Influence in politics 6.3 Wisdom 6.4 Speaking a common language 6.5 Location7 Proselytizing movements 8 See also 9 Footnotes 10 References 11 External linksEtymology[edit] Da‘wah literally means "issuing a summons" or "making an invitation", being a gerund of a verb meaning variously "to summon" or "to invite" (whose triconsonantal root is d-ʕ-w دعو)
[...More...]

"Dawah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Prophetic Biography
In Islam, Al-sīra al-Nabawiyya (Prophetic biography[1]), Sīrat Rasūl Allāh (Life of the Messenger of God[2]), or just Al-sīra are the traditional Muslim
Muslim
biographies of Muhammad
Muhammad
from which, in addition to the
[...More...]

"Prophetic Biography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tafsir
Tafsir
Tafsir
(Arabic: تفسير‎, translit. Tafsīr, lit. 'interpretation') is the Arabic word for exegesis, usually of the Qur'an. An author of tafsir is a mufassir (Arabic: مُفسّر‎; plural: Arabic: مفسّرون‎, translit. mufassirūn). A Qur'anic
Qur'anic
tafsir attempts at providing elucidation, explanation, interpretation, or commentary for clear understanding and conviction of God's will.[1] Principally, tafsir deals with the issues of linguistics, jurisprudence, and theology. In terms of perspective and approach, tafsir can be broadly divided into two categories, namely tafsir bi-al-ma'thur (lit. received tafsir) which is transmitted from the early days of Islam
Islam
through the prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and his companions, and tafsir bi-al-ra'y (lit
[...More...]

"Tafsir" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islamic Art
Islamic
Islamic
art encompasses the visual arts produced from the 7th century onward by people who lived within the territory that was inhabited by or ruled by culturally Islamic
Islamic
populations.[1] It is thus a very difficult art to define because it covers many lands and various peoples over some 1,400 years; it is not art specifically of a religion, or of a time, or of a place, or of a single medium like painting.[2] The huge field of Islamic
Islamic
architecture is the subject of a separate article, leaving fields as varied as calligraphy, painting, glass, pottery, and textile arts such as carpets and embroidery. Islamic
Islamic
art is not at all restricted to religious art, but includes all the art of the rich and varied cultures of Islamic
Islamic
societies as well
[...More...]

"Islamic Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Islamic Poetry
Islamic
Islamic
poetry is poetry written by Muslims. Islamic
Islamic
poetry has been written in many languages.Contents1 History and origins 2 Islamic
Islamic
poetry in different languages 3 Genres of Islamic
Islamic
poetry 4 ReferencesHistory and origins[edit] Beginning with the migration of Muhammad
Muhammad
and his followers to Mecca (A.D. 622), also known as the Hijrah, the quasidah or ode was a sharp contrast to the sacred Quran. Writers at the time of pre-Islamic poetry were considered to be lacking the knowledge and authority necessary to be writing such poetry, thus leading this period of time to be called the “Age of Ignorance”
[...More...]

"Islamic Poetry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Muslim World
The terms Muslim
Muslim
world and Islamic world commonly refer to the unified Islamic community (Ummah), consisting of all those who adhere to the religion of Islam,[1] or to societies where Islam
Islam
is practiced.[2][3] In a modern geopolitical sense, these terms refer to countries where Islam
Islam
is widespread, although there are no agreed criteria for inclusion.[4][3] Some scholars and commentators have criticised the term 'Muslim/Islamic world' and its derivative terms 'Muslim/Islamic country' as "simplistic" and "binary", since no state has a religiously homogeneous population (e.g. Egypt's citizens are c
[...More...]

"Muslim World" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islamic Philosophy
In the religion of Islam, two words are sometimes translated as philosophy—falsafa (literally "philosophy"), which refers to philosophy as well as logic, mathematics and physics;[1] and Kalam (literally "speech"), which refers to a kind of philosophy based on interpretations of Aristotelianism
Aristotelianism
and Neoplatonism. Islamic philosophy has also been described as the systematic investigation of problems connected with life, the universe, ethics, society, and so on as conducted in the Muslim
Muslim
world. Early Islamic philosophy
Early Islamic philosophy
began in the 2nd century AH of the Islamic calendar (early 9th century CE) and lasted until the 6th century AH (late 12th century CE)
[...More...]

"Islamic Philosophy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Political Aspects Of Islam
PoliticalHizb ut-Tahrir Iranian Revolution Jamaat-e-Islami Millî Görüş Muslim
Muslim
Brotherhood List of Islamic political partiesMilitantMilitant Islamism
Islamism
based inMENA region South Asia Southeast Asia Sub-Saharan AfricaKey texts<
[...More...]

"Political Aspects Of Islam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Timeline Of Islamic History
Timeline of Islamic history: 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th 21st centuryPart of a series onIslamBeliefsOneness of GodProphets Revealed booksAngels PredestinationDay of ResurrectionPracticesProfession of faith PrayerFasting Alms-giving PilgrimageTexts and lawsQuran Tafsir Sunnah
Sunnah
(Hadith, Sirah) Sharia
[...More...]

"Timeline Of Islamic History" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ahl Al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
(Arabic: أهل البيت‎, Persian: اهلِ بیت‎), also Āl al-Bayt, is a phrase meaning, literally, "People of the House" or "Family of the House". Within the Islamic tradition, the term refers to the family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1] In Shia Islam
Shia Islam
the Ahl al-Bayt
Ahl al-Bayt
are central to Islam
Islam
and interpreters of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah. Shias believe they are successors of Muhammad and consist of Muhammad, Fatimah, Ali, Hasan, and Husayn (known collectively as the Ahl al-Kisa, "people of the mantle") and the Imams the Fourteen Infallibles
[...More...]

"Ahl Al-Bayt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sahabah
The term aṣ-ṣaḥābah (Arabic: الصحابة‎ meaning "the companions", from the verb صَحِبَ meaning "accompany", "keep company with", "associate with") refers to the companions, disciples, scribes and family of the Islamic prophet Muhammad.[1][2] This form is definite plural; the indefinite singular is masculine sahabi (ṣaḥābī), feminine sahabia (ṣaḥābīyat). Later scholars accepted their testimony of the words and deeds of Muhammad, the occasions on which the Quran
Quran
was revealed and various important matters of Islamic history and practice
[...More...]

"Sahabah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rashidun
OthersZahiri Awza'i Thawri Laythi JaririSunni schools of theologyAsh'ari Maturidi TraditionalistOthers:Mu'tazila Murji'ahContemporary movementsAhl-i Hadith Al-Ahbash Barelvi Deobandi Islamic Modernism Salafi movement WahhabismHoly sitesJerusalem Mecca Medina Mount SinaiListsLiteratureKutub al-Sittah Islam
Islam
portalv t eThe Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphs (Rightly Guided Caliphs; Arabic: الخلفاء الراشدون‎ al-Khulafāʾu ar-Rāshidūn), often simply called, collectively, "the Rashidun", is a term used in Sunni Islam
Islam
to refer to the 30-year reign of the first four caliphs (successors) following the death of the Islamic prophet Muhammad, namely: Abu Bakr, Umar, Uthman
Uthman
ibn Affan, and Ali
Ali
of the Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphate, the first caliphate
[...More...]

"Rashidun" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mosque
A mosque (/mɒsk/; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid) is a place of worship for Muslims. There are strict and detailed requirements in Sunni jurisprudence (Arabic: فِـقْـه‎, fiqh) for a place of worship to be considered a mosque, with places that do not meet these requirements regarded as musallas.[1] There are stringent restrictions on the uses of the area formally demarcated as the mosque (which is often a small portion of the larger complex), and in the Islamic Sharī‘ah (Arabic: شَـرِيْـعَـة‎, Law), after an area is formally designated as a mosque, it remains so until the Last Day.[1] Many mosques have elaborate domes, minarets, and prayer halls, in varying styles of architecture. Mosques originated on the Arabian Peninsula, but are now found in all inhabited continents
[...More...]

"Mosque" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Caliphate
A caliphate (Arabic: خِلافة‎ khilāfah) is a state under the leadership of an Islamic steward with the title of caliph (/ˈkælɪf, ˈkeɪ-/, Arabic: خَليفة‎ khalīfah,  pronunciation (help·info)), a person considered a religious successor to the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
and a leader of the entire Muslim
Muslim
community.[1] Historically, the caliphates were polities based in Islam
Islam
which developed into multi-ethnic trans-national empires.[2] During the medieval period, three major caliphates succeeded each other: the Rashidun Caliphate
Rashidun Caliphate
(632–661), the Umayyad Caliphate
Umayyad Caliphate
(661–750) and the Abbasid Caliphate (750–1258)
[...More...]

"Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fiqh
Fiqh
Fiqh
(/fɪk/; Arabic: فقه‎ [fɪqh]) is Islamic jurisprudence.[1] While sharia is believed by Muslims to represent divine law as revealed in the Quran
Quran
and the Sunnah
Sunnah
(the teachings and practices of the Islamic prophet
Islamic prophet
Muhammad), fiqh is the human understanding of the sharia[2]—sharia expanded and developed by interpretation (ijtihad) of the Quran
Quran
and Sunnah
Sunnah
by Islamic jurists (ulama)[2] and implemented by the rulings (fatwa) of jurists on questions presented to them. Thus conceptually, whereas sharia is considered immutable and infallible, fiqh is considered fallible and changeable. Fiqh
Fiqh
deals with the observance of rituals, morals and social legislation in Islam
[...More...]

"Fiqh" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Islamic Culture
PoliticalHizb ut-Tahrir Iranian Revolution Jamaat-e-Islami Millî Görüş Muslim
Muslim
Brotherhood List of Islamic political partiesMilitantMilitant Islamism
Islamism
based inMENA region South Asia Southeast Asia Sub-Saharan AfricaKey texts<
[...More...]

"Islamic Culture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.