HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cumberland
CUMBERLAND (/ˈkʌmbələnd/ _KUM-bə-lənd_ ; locally /ˈkʊmbələnd/ _KUUM-bə-lənd_ ) is a historic county of North West England
England
that had an administrative function from the 12th century until 1974. It was bordered by Northumberland
Northumberland
to the east, County Durham to the southeast, Westmorland and Lancashire
Lancashire
to the south, and the Scottish counties of Dumfriesshire and Roxburghshire to the north. It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974 (excluding Carlisle from 1914) and now forms part of Cumbria
Cumbria

[...More...]

"Cumberland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Flag Of Cumberland
The CUMBERLAND FLAG is the flag of the historic county of Cumberland . It was registered with the Flag Institute
Flag Institute
as the flag of the county in December 2012. CONTENTS * 1 Design * 2 External links * 3 References DESIGNThe flag is based on the pattern of the arms of the former Cumberland County Council , originally granted by the College of Arms
College of Arms
on 19 September 1950, namely: Per fesse vert and barry wavy of six Argent and Azure in chief three Parnassus Flowers proper. The Parnassus flower is a wildflower of the marshy uplands and which has been chosen as the county flower of Cumberland, growing here on a green field. The wavy blue and white stripes in base are for the coastline and the famed lakes of the county
[...More...]

"Flag Of Cumberland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Historic Counties Of England
The HISTORIC COUNTIES OF ENGLAND were established for administration by the Normans , in most cases based on earlier kingdoms and shires established by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
and others. They ceased to be used for administration with the creation of the administrative counties in 1889. They are alternatively known as ANCIENT COUNTIES or TRADITIONAL COUNTIES. Where they are not included among the modern counties of England
England
they are also known as FORMER COUNTIES. Despite this name, several historic counties continue to be recognised as cultural regions and have their own county days , county flags and boundary signs, many of which were created or registered long after these counties were abandoned as units for administrative purposes
[...More...]

"Historic Counties Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cumbria
CUMBRIA (English: /ˈkʌmbriə/ _KUM-bree-ə_ ; locally _KUUM-bree-ə_ ) is a non-metropolitan county in North West England . The county and Cumbria County Council , its local government , came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972 . Cumbria's county town is Carlisle , in the north of the county, and the only other major urban area is Barrow-in-Furness on the southwestern tip of the county. The county of Cumbria consists of six districts ( Allerdale , Barrow-in-Furness , Carlisle , Copeland , Eden and South Lakeland ), and in 2008 had a population of just under half a million. Cumbria is one of the most sparsely populated counties in the United Kingdom, with 73.4 people per km2 (190/sq mi)
[...More...]

"Cumbria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Administrative County
An ADMINISTRATIVE COUNTY was an administrative division in England and Wales and Ireland from 1888 to 1974, used for the purposes of local government . They are now abolished, although in Northern Ireland their former areas are used as the basis for lieutenancy . CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 England and Wales * 1.2 Scotland * 1.3 Ireland * 2 New entities * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYENGLAND AND WALES Further information: Administrative counties of England Further information: Subdivisions of Wales The term was introduced for England and Wales by the Local Government Act 1888 , which created county councils for various areas, and called them 'administrative counties' to distinguish them from the continuing statutory counties
[...More...]

"Administrative County" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ceremonial Counties Of England
The CEREMONIAL COUNTIES, also referred to as the LIEUTENANCY AREAS OF ENGLAND, are areas of England to which a Lord Lieutenant is appointed. Legally the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997 as COUNTIES AND AREAS FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE LIEUTENANCIES IN GREAT BRITAIN, in contrast to the areas used for local government . They are also informally known as GEOGRAPHIC COUNTIES, as often representing more permanent features of English geography, and to distinguish them from counties of England which have a present-day administrative function
[...More...]

"Ceremonial Counties Of England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Chapman Code
CHAPMAN CODES are a set of 3-letter codes used in genealogy to identify the administrative divisions in the United Kingdom , Ireland , the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands . CONTENTS * 1 Use * 2 Other uses * 3 Country codes * 4 Channel Islands * 5 England * 5.1 Ancient counties * 5.2 Ceremonial counties created since 1974 * 6 Scotland * 6.1 Ancient counties * 6.2 1975–1996 regions * 7 Wales * 7.1 Historic counties * 7.2 1974–1996 * 8 Ireland * 9 References USEThey were created by the historian, Dr. Colin R Chapman, in the late 1970s, and as intended, provide a widely used shorthand in genealogy which follows the common practice of describing areas in terms of the counties existing in the 19th and 20th centuries. OTHER USESChapman codes have no mapping, postal or administrative use
[...More...]

"Chapman Code" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cumberland County Council, England
CUMBERLAND COUNTY COUNCIL was the county council of Cumberland
Cumberland
in the North West of England , an elected local government body responsible for most local services in the county. It was established in 1889 as a result of the Local Government Act 1888 . Carlisle was initially within its area but became a separate county borough in 1914. In 1974, both authorities were merged along with parts of others into the new Cumbria County Council . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Position of Carlisle * 3 Abolition in 1974 * 4 Elections * 4.1 1889 * 4.2 1892 * 4.3 1970 * 5 Notable members * 6 See also * 7 References HISTORYCounty Councils were first introduced in England and Wales
England and Wales
with full powers from 22 September 1889 as a result of the Local Government Act 1888 , taking over administrative functions until then carried out by the unelected Quarter Sessions
[...More...]

"Cumberland County Council, England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Administrative Centre
An ADMINISTRATIVE CENTRE is a seat of regional administration or local government , or a county town , or the place where the central administration of a commune is located. In countries which have French as one of their administrative languages (such as Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland or many African countries) and in some other countries (such as Italy, cf. cognate _capoluogo_), a CHEF-LIEU (French pronunciation: ​ , plural form _chefs-lieux_ (literally "chief place" or "head place"), is a town or city that is pre-eminent from an administrative perspective. The ‘f’ in chef-lieu is pronounced, in contrast to chef-d'oeuvre where it is mute
[...More...]

"Administrative Centre" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cumbrian Dialect
The CUMBRIAN DIALECT is a local Northern English dialect in decline, spoken in Cumbria
Cumbria
(including historic Cumberland
Cumberland
and Westmorland
Westmorland
) and surrounding northern England
England
, not to be confused with the area's extinct Celtic language
Celtic language
, Cumbric
Cumbric
. Most of the parts of Cumbria
Cumbria
have a more North-East English sound to them. Whilst clearly being a Northern English accent, it shares much vocabulary with Scots . A Cumbrian Dictionary of Dialect, Tradition and Folklore by William Rollinson exists, as well a more contemporary and lighthearted Cumbrian Dictionary and Phrase Book
[...More...]

"Cumbrian Dialect" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

North West England
NORTH WEST ENGLAND, one of nine official regions of England , consists of the five counties of Cheshire , Cumbria , Greater Manchester , Lancashire and Merseyside . The North West had a population of 7,052,000 in 2011
[...More...]

"North West England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Northumberland
NORTHUMBERLAND (/nɔːrˈθʌmbərlənd/ locally /nɔːˈθʊmbələnd/ ) (abbreviated NORTHD) is a county in North East England . The northernmost county of England, it borders Cumbria to the west, County Durham and Tyne and Wear to the south and the Scottish Borders to the north. To the east is the North Sea coastline with a 64-mile (103 km) long distance path. The county town is Alnwick , although the county council is in Morpeth . The county of Northumberland included Newcastle upon Tyne until 1400, when the city became a county of itself . Northumberland expanded greatly in the Tudor period , annexing Berwick-upon-Tweed in 1482, Tynedale in 1495, Tynemouth in 1536, Redesdale around 1542 and Hexhamshire in 1572
[...More...]

"Northumberland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

County Durham
COUNTY DURHAM (/ˈdʌrəm/ , locally /ˈdɜːrəm/ ) is a county in North East England
England
. The county town is Durham , a cathedral city . The largest settlement is Darlington
Darlington
, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees . It borders Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
to the north east, Northumberland
Northumberland
to the north, Cumbria
Cumbria
to the west and North Yorkshire to the south. Historically , the county included southern Tyne and Wear, including Gateshead
Gateshead
and Sunderland . During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert
Cuthbert
being in Durham Cathedral , and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham
[...More...]

"County Durham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Westmorland
WESTMORLAND (/ˈwɛstmərlənd/ ; formerly also spelt Westmoreland; even older spellings are Westmerland and Westmereland) is an area of North West England and one of the 39 historic counties of England . It formed an administrative county from 1889 to 1974, when it was dissolved, after which the whole county was administered by the new administrative county of Cumbria
Cumbria
. In 2013, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government , Eric Pickles , formally recognised and acknowledged the continued existence of England's 39 historic counties, including Westmorland
[...More...]

"Westmorland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lancashire
LANCASHIRE (/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ , /ˈlæŋkəʃɪər/ or, locally, ; archaically the COUNTY PALATINE OF LANCASTER; abbreviated Lancs.) is a non-metropolitan ceremonial county in north west England . The county town is Lancaster although the county's administrative centre is Preston . The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the _ Domesday Book _ of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire . The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey , _Inter Ripam et Mersam_, was included in the returns for Cheshire . When its boundaries were established, it bordered Cumberland , Westmorland , Yorkshire, and Cheshire
[...More...]