HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Countersubject
In music, a subject is the material, usually a recognizable melody, upon which part or all of a composition is based. In forms other than the fugue, this may be known as the theme.Contents1 Characteristics 2 In different types of music 3 Countersubject 4 See also 5 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] A subject may be perceivable as a complete musical expression in itself, separate from the work in which it is found (Drabkin 2001). In contrast to an idea or motif, a subject is usually a complete phrase or period (Dunsby 2002). The Encyclopédie Fasquelle defines a theme (subject) as "[a]ny element, motif, or small musical piece that has given rise to some variation becomes thereby a theme" (Michel & 1958–61). Thematic changes and processes are often structurally important, and theorists such as Rudolph Reti have created analysis from a purely thematic perspective (Reti 1951; Reti 1967)
[...More...]

"Countersubject" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Theme Music
Theme music is a piece that is often written specifically for a radio program, television program, video game or movie, and usually played during the intro, opening credits and/or ending credits.[1] The phrase theme song or signature tune may also be used to refer to a signature song that has become especially associated with a particular performer or dignitary; often used as they make an entrance. The purpose of a theme song is often similar to that of a leitmotif. Such songs can also be used in other ways. One author has made extensive use of them in an effort to explore the feelings behind world views.[2]Contents1 Purpose 2 Celebrities 3 Popularity3.1 Remixes 3.2 Radio 3.3 Video games4 See also 5 References 6 External linksPurpose[edit] The purpose of the music is to establish a mood for the show and to provide an audible cue that a particular show is beginning, which was especially useful in the early days of radio (See also interval signal)
[...More...]

"Theme Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Counterpoint
In music, counterpoint is the relationship between voices that are harmonically interdependent (polyphony) yet independent in rhythm and contour.[1] It has been most commonly identified in the European classical tradition, strongly developing during the Renaissance and in much of the common practice period, especially in the Baroque
[...More...]

"Counterpoint" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Polyphonie X
Polyphonie X is a composition by Pierre Boulez
Pierre Boulez
for eighteen instruments divided into seven groups, written in 1950–51. It is in three movements. It is one of the first works of Boulez's total serial period. It was composed shortly after "Structure 1a", the opening of the piano duo Structures I (Heyworth 1973, p. 14; Jameux 1991, p. 52), the movement the composer would later describe as an experiment with "an expressive nadir" (Jameux 1991, p. 51)
[...More...]

"Polyphonie X" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Structures (Boulez)
Structures I (1952) and Structures II (1961) are two related works for two pianos, composed by the French composer Pierre Boulez.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Discography 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] The first book of Structures was begun in early 1951, as Boulez was completing his orchestral work Polyphonie X, and finished in 1952. It consists of three movements, or "chapters", labelled Ia, Ib, and Ic, composed in the order a, c, b. The first of the second book's two "chapters" was composed in 1956, but chapter 2 was not written until 1961. The second chapter includes three sets of variable elements, which are to be arranged to make a performing version (Häusler 1965, 5). A partial premiere of book 2 was performed by the composer and Yvonne Loriod at the Wigmore Hall, London, in March 1957
[...More...]

"Structures (Boulez)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pierre Boulez
Pierre Louis Joseph Boulez CBE
CBE
(French: [pjɛʁ bu.lɛːz]; 26 March 1925 – 5 January 2016) was a French composer, conductor, writer and founder of institutions. He was one of the dominant figures of the post-war classical music world. Born in Montbrison in the Loire department of France, the son of an engineer, Boulez studied at the Conservatoire de Paris
Conservatoire de Paris
with Olivier Messiaen, and privately with Andrée Vaurabourg
Andrée Vaurabourg
and René Leibowitz. He began his professional career in the late 1940s as Music Director of the Renaud-Barrault theatre company in Paris. As a young composer in the 1950s he quickly became a leading figure in avant-garde music, playing an important role in the development of integral serialism and controlled chance music. From the 1970s onwards he pioneered the electronic transformation of instrumental music in real time
[...More...]

"Pierre Boulez" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Sonata For Two Pianos (Goeyvaerts)
Sonata for Two Pianos (1950–51), also called simply Opus 1 or Nummer 1, is a chamber-music work by Belgian composer Karel Goeyvaerts, and a seminal work in the early history of European serialism.Contents1 History 2 Material and form 3 Discography 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] Goeyvaerts composed the Sonata during the winter of 1950–51, and brought the score with him when he attended the Darmstädter Ferienkurse in the Summer of 1951. There he met Karlheinz Stockhausen, five years his junior and at the time and a student in his last year at the Cologne Conservatory. Goeyvaert's and Stockhausen's analysis and performance of the second movement of the Sonata in Theodor W. Adorno's composition seminar had considerable significance for those young composers eager to develop serial thinking
[...More...]

"Sonata For Two Pianos (Goeyvaerts)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Karel Goeyvaerts
Karel Goeyvaerts (8 June 1923 – 3 February 1993) was a Belgian composer.Contents1 Life 2 Selected works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Goeyvaerts was born in Antwerp, where he studied at the Royal Flemish Music Conservatory; he later studied composition in Paris with Darius Milhaud and analysis with Olivier Messiaen. He also studied ondes Martenot with Maurice Martenot, who invented the instrument (Delaere 2001). In 1951, Goeyvaerts attended the famous Darmstadt New Music Summer School where he met Karlheinz Stockhausen
Karlheinz Stockhausen
who was five years younger. Both were devout Catholics and found ways of integrating religious numerology into their serial compositions. They found themselves deep in conversation, and performed a movement from Goeyvaerts's "Nummer 1", Sonata for Two Pianos, in the composition course by Theodor Adorno there
[...More...]

"Karel Goeyvaerts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Punkte
Punkte
Punkte
(Points) is an orchestral composition by Karlheinz Stockhausen, given the work number ½ in his catalogue of works.Contents1 History 2 Instrumentation2.1 1952 version 2.2 1962–93 version3 Analysis 4 Discography 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Punkte
Punkte
originated as a punctual orchestral work which was begun in September in Hamburg and had reached a first-draft stage by 30 September. The final draft was completed on 24 October 1952, but the work remained unperformed and unpublished (Blumröder 1993, 97–99; Frisius 2008, 56). The work did not receive the title by which it is known today until much later, however
[...More...]

"Punkte" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Karlheinz Stockhausen
Karlheinz Stockhausen
Karlheinz Stockhausen
(German: [kaʁlˈhaɪnts ˈʃtɔkhaʊzn̩]; 22 August 1928 – 5 December 2007) was a German composer, widely acknowledged by critics as one of the most important (Barrett 1988, 45; Harvey 1975b, 705; Hopkins 1972, 33; Klein 1968, 117) but also controversial (Power 1990, 30) composers of the 20th and early 21st centuries. A critic calls him "one of the great visionaries of 20th-century music" (Hewett 2007). He is known for his groundbreaking work in electronic music, for introducing controlled chance (aleatory techniques or aleatoric musical techniques) into serial composition, and for musical spatialization. He was educated at the Hochschule für Musik Köln
Hochschule für Musik Köln
and the University of Cologne, later studying with Olivier Messiaen
Olivier Messiaen
in Paris and with Werner Meyer-Eppler at the University of Bonn
[...More...]

"Karlheinz Stockhausen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach[a] (31 March [O.S. 21 March] 1685 – 28 July 1750) was a German composer and musician of the Baroque period. He is known for instrumental compositions such as the Brandenburg Concertos
Brandenburg Concertos
and the Goldberg Variations, and vocal music such as the St Matthew Passion and the Mass in B minor. Since the 19th-century Bach Revival he has been generally regarded as one of the greatest composers of all time.[3] The Bach family
Bach family
already counted several composers when Johann Sebastian was born as the last child of a city musician in Eisenach. Having become an orphan at age 10, he lived for five years with his eldest brother, after which he continued his musical formation in Lüneburg
[...More...]

"Johann Sebastian Bach" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Well-Tempered Clavier
The Well-Tempered Clavier, BWV 846–893, is a collection of two sets of preludes and fugues in all 24 major and minor keys, composed for solo keyboard by Johann Sebastian Bach. In the German of Bach's time Clavier (keyboard) was a generic name indicating a variety of keyboard instruments, most typically a harpsichord or clavichord – but not excluding an organ either. The modern German spelling for the collection is Das wohltemperierte Klavier (WTK; German pronunciation: [das ˌvoːlˌtɛmpəˈʁiːɐ̯tə klaˈviːɐ̯]). Bach
Bach
gave the title Das Wohltemperirte Clavier to a book of preludes and fugues in all 24 major and minor keys, dated 1722, composed "for the profit and use of musical youth desirous of learning, and especially for the pastime of those already skilled in this study"
[...More...]

"The Well-Tempered Clavier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Resolution (music)
Resolution in western tonal music theory is the move of a note or chord from dissonance (an unstable sound) to a consonance (a more final or stable sounding one). Dissonance, resolution, and suspense can be used to create musical interest. Where a melody or chordal pattern is expected to resolve to a certain note or chord, a different but similarly suitable note can be resolved to instead, creating an interesting and unexpected sound. For example, the deceptive cadence.Contents1 Basis 2 Example 3 See also 4 SourcesBasis[edit]A dissonance has its resolution when it moves to a consonance. When a resolution is delayed or is accomplished in surprising ways—when the composer plays with our sense of expectation—a feeling of drama or suspense is created. —  Roger Kamien (2008), p.41[3]Resolution has a strong basis in tonal music, since atonal music generally contains a more constant level of dissonance and lacks a tonal center to which to resolve
[...More...]

"Resolution (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Main Theme
"Main Theme" is an instrumental track by English band Pink Floyd
Pink Floyd
on their third album, Soundtrack
Soundtrack
from the Film More.[2][3] The track is played at the beginning of the film, when Stefan is waiting for someone to pick him up along a road to Paris.Contents1 Structure 2 Cover 3 Personnel 4 References 5 External linksStructure[edit] The track begins with a panning gong that lasts as a drone sound for the whole piece; at 0:30 the Farfisa organ
Farfisa organ
starts a progression of modal chords, that fades at 1:12 into a drum-bass iterative sequence, similar to, but slower than, the one featured at the opening of "Let There Be More Light". The organ played through a wah-wah pedal (1:20) plays a progression of background notes over the drum-bass line, while the untreated organ plays the main melodic notes (2:10). The slide guitar plays from the middle of the piece onward
[...More...]

"Main Theme" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Attacco
Attacco, in music, indicates a short phrase, treated as a point of imitation; and employed, either as the subject of a fugue, as a subordinate element introduced for the purpose of increasing the interest of its development, as a leading feature in a motet, madrigal, full anthem, or other choral composition, or as a means of relieving the monotony of an otherwise too homogeneous part-song. The name comes from the Italian attaccare, "to unite" or "to bind together." Attacco (It.) (Lit., a binding together.) A 'point' of imitation—that is, any short passage or figure proposed for treatment by imitation. In fugues the attacco is often made from a fragment of the subject or of the andamento, but is sometimes quite independent.[1]A striking instance of an attacco used as the subject of a fugue is J. S. Bach's The Well-Tempered Clavier, No
[...More...]

"Attacco" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Cell (music)
The 1957 Encyclopédie Larousse[1] defines a cell in music as a "small rhythmic and melodic design that can be isolated, or can make up one part of a thematic context". The cell may be distinguished from the figure or motif: the 1958 Encyclopédie Fasquelle[1] defines a cell as, "the smallest indivisible unit", unlike the motif, which may be divisible into more than one cell. "A cell can be developed, independent of its context, as a melodic fragment, it can be used as a developmental motif. It can be the source for the whole structure of the work; in that case it is called a generative cell".[2]Tresillo, a rhythmic cell of the tango and habanera.[3][4]  Play (help·info)A rhythmic cell is a cell without melodic connotations. It may be entirely percussive or applied to different melodic segments. See also[edit]Clave (rhythm) Hauptrhythmus Ostinato VampReferences[edit]^ a b quoted in Nattiez, Jean-Jacques (1990)
[...More...]

"Cell (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.