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CompactFlash
CompactFlash
CompactFlash
(CF) is a flash memory mass storage device used mainly in portable electronic devices. The format was specified and the devices were first manufactured by SanDisk
SanDisk
in 1994.[4] CompactFlash
CompactFlash
became the most successful of the early memory card formats, surpassing Miniature Card
Miniature Card
and SmartMedia. Subsequent formats, such as MMC/SD, various Memory Stick
Memory Stick
formats, and xD-Picture Card offered stiff competition. Most of these cards are smaller than CompactFlash
CompactFlash
while offering comparable capacity and speed
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Gigabyte
The gigabyte (/ˈɡɪɡəbaɪt/ GIG-ə-byt or /ˈdʒɪɡəbaɪt/[1]) is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The prefix giga means 109 in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI). Therefore, one gigabyte is 1000000000bytes. The unit symbol for the gigabyte is GB. This definition is used in all contexts of science, engineering, business, and many areas of computing, including hard drive, solid state drive, and tape capacities, as well as data transmission speeds. However, the term is also used in some fields of computer science and information technology to denote 1073741824 (10243 or 230) bytes, particularly for sizes of RAM. The use of gigabyte may thus be ambiguous
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Hitachi
Hitachi, Ltd. (株式会社日立製作所, Kabushiki-gaisha Hitachi Seisakusho) (Japanese pronunciation: [çiꜜtatɕi]) is a Japanese multinational conglomerate company headquartered in Chiyoda, Tokyo, Japan. It is the parent company of the Hitachi
Hitachi
Group (Hitachi Gurūpu) and forms part of the DKB Group of companies
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Firewire
IEEE 1394
IEEE 1394
is an interface standard for a serial bus for high-speed communications and isochronous real-time data transfer. It was developed in the late 1980s and early 1990s by Apple, which called it FireWire. The 1394 interface is also known by the brands i.LINK (Sony), and Lynx (Texas Instruments). The copper cable it uses in its most common implementation can be up to 4.5 metres (15 ft) long. Power is also carried over this cable, allowing devices with moderate power requirements to operate without a separate power supply
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Universal Serial Bus
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
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Intel
Coordinates: 37°23′16.54″N 121°57′48.74″W / 37.3879278°N 121.9635389°W / 37.3879278; -121.9635389 Intel
Intel
Corporation Intel
Intel
Corporation's current logo, used since 2006Intel's headquarters in Santa Clara, CaliforniaFormerly calledN M
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Hard Disk
A hard disk drive (HDD), hard disk, hard drive or fixed disk[b] is a data storage device that uses magnetic storage to store and retrieve digital information using one or more rigid rapidly rotating disks (platters) coated with magnetic material. The platters are paired with magnetic heads, usually arranged on a moving actuator arm, which read and write data to the platter surfaces.[2] Data is accessed in a random-access manner, meaning that individual blocks of data can be stored or retrieved in any order and not only sequentially. HDDs are a type of non-volatile storage, retaining stored data even when powered off.[3][4][5] Introduced by IBM
IBM
in 1956,[6] HDDs became the dominant secondary storage device for general-purpose computers by the early 1960s. Continuously improved, HDDs have maintained this position into the modern era of servers and personal computers
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Tebibyte
The tebibyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. It is a member of the set of units with binary prefixes defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission
International Electrotechnical Commission
(IEC).[1] Its unit symbol is TiB. The prefix tebi (symbol Ti) represents multiplication by 10244, therefore:1 tebibyte = 240 bytes = 1099511627776bytes = 1024 gibibytesThe tebibyte is closely related to the terabyte (TB), which is defined as 1012 bytes = 1000000000000bytes. It follows that one tebibyte (1 TiB) is approximately equal to 1.1 TB. In some contexts, the terabyte has been used as a synonym for tebibyte.[2] (see Consumer confusion). One thousand twenty-four tebibytes (1024 TiB) is equal to one pebibyte (1 PiB). See also[edit]IEEE 1541 ISO/IEC 80000-13 Orders of magnitude (data) SI prefixReferences[edit]^ "Prefixes for binary multiples". NIST. 2007
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Volt
The volt (symbol: V) is the derived unit for electric potential, electric potential difference (voltage), and electromotive force.[1] It is named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745–1827).Contents1 Definition1.1 Josephson junction definition2 Water-flow analogy 3 Common voltages 4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDefinition[edit] One volt is defined as the difference in electric potential between two points of a conducting wire when an electric current of one ampere dissipates one watt of power between those points.[2] It is also equal to the potential difference between two parallel, infinite planes spaced 1 meter apart that create an electric field of 1 newton per coulomb. Additionally, it is the potential difference between two points that will impart one joule of energy per coulomb of charge that passes through it
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Cylinder-head-sector
Cylinder-head-sector
Cylinder-head-sector
(CHS) is an early method for giving addresses to each physical block of data on a hard disk drive. Early hard drives didn't come with an embedded disk controller; a separate controller card was used, and the operating system had to know the exact physical "geometry" of the drive behind the controller to use it. As the geometry became more complicated and drive sizes grew over time, the CHS addressing method became restrictive. Since late 1980s, hard drives begun shipping with an embedded disk controller[1] that had good knowledge of the physical geometry; they would report a false geometry to the computer, e.g. a larger number of heads than actually present, to gain more addressable space
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Logical Block Addressing
Logical block addressing
Logical block addressing
(LBA) is a common scheme used for specifying the location of blocks of data stored on computer storage devices, generally secondary storage systems such as hard disk drives. LBA is a particularly simple linear addressing scheme; blocks are located by an integer index, with the first block being LBA 0, the second LBA 1, and so on. The IDE standard included 22-bit LBA as an option, which was further extended to 28-bit with the release of ATA-1 (1994) and to 48-bit with the release of ATA-6
ATA-6
(2003), whereas the size of entries in on-disk and in-memory data structures holding the address is typically 32 or 64 bits
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Ikegami Tsushinki
Ikegami Tsushinki
Ikegami Tsushinki
Co., Ltd. (池上通信機株式会社, Ikegami Tsūshinki Kabushiki-gaisha) (TYO: 6771) is a Japanese manufacturer of professional and broadcast television equipment, especially professional video cameras, both for electronic news gathering and studio use. The company was founded in 1946.Contents1 History 2 Products 3 External links 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Ikegami high definition video camera of NHK Kobe.Ikegami introduced of the first portable hand-held TV camera. The camera made its debut in the United States in May 1962, when CBS
CBS
used it to document the launching of NASA's Aurora 7 manned space flight. In 1972, Ikegami introduced the HL-33, the first compact hand-held color video camera for ENG
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IBM
IBM
IBM
(International Business
Business
Machines Corporation) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries. The company originated in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
(CTR) and was renamed "International Business
Business
Machines" in 1924. IBM
IBM
manufactures and markets computer hardware, middleware and software, and provides hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. IBM
IBM
is also a major research organization, holding the record for most U.S
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Hard Disk Drive
A hard disk drive (HDD), hard disk, hard drive or fixed disk[b] is a data storage device that uses magnetic storage to store and retrieve digital information using one or more rigid rapidly rotating disks (platters) coated with magnetic material. The platters are paired with magnetic heads, usually arranged on a moving actuator arm, which read and write data to the platter surfaces.[2] Data is accessed in a random-access manner, meaning that individual blocks of data can be stored or retrieved in any order and not only sequentially. HDDs are a type of non-volatile storage, retaining stored data even when powered off.[3][4][5] Introduced by IBM
IBM
in 1956,[6] HDDs became the dominant secondary storage device for general-purpose computers by the early 1960s. Continuously improved, HDDs have maintained this position into the modern era of servers and personal computers
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DSLR
A digital single-lens reflex camera (also called a digital SLR or DSLR) is a digital camera that combines the optics and the mechanisms of a single-lens reflex camera with a digital imaging sensor, as opposed to photographic film. The reflex design scheme is the primary difference between a DSLR
DSLR
and other digital cameras. In the reflex design, light travels through the lens, then to a mirror that alternates to send the image to either the viewfinder or the image sensor. The traditional alternative would be to have a viewfinder with its own lens, hence the term "single lens" for this design
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Seagate Technology
Seagate Technology
Seagate Technology
PLC (commonly referred to as Seagate) is an American data storage company. It was incorporated in 1978, as Shugart Technology. Since 2010, the company is incorporated in Dublin, Ireland, with operational headquarters in Cupertino, California, United States.[2] Stephen J. Luczo
Stephen J. Luczo
is the current Chairman of the board of directors and David Mosley is CEO
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