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Cannons
A cannon (plural: cannon or cannons) is a type of gun classified as artillery that launches a projectile using propellant. In the past, gunpowder was the primary propellant before the invention of smokeless powder in the 19th century. Cannon
Cannon
vary in caliber, range, mobility, rate of fire, angle of fire, and firepower; different forms of cannon combine and balance these attributes in varying degrees, depending on their intended use on the battlefield. The word cannon is derived from several languages, in which the original definition can usually be translated as tube, cane, or reed
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Fire-lance
The fire lance (simplified Chinese: 火枪; traditional Chinese: 火槍; pinyin: huǒ qiāng) was a very early gunpowder weapon that appeared in 10th century China during the Jin-Song Wars. It began as a small pyrotechnic device attached to a spear-like weapon, used to gain a critical shock advantage right at the start of a melee.[1] As gunpowder improved, the explosive discharge was increased, and debris or pellets added, giving it some of the effects of a combination modern flamethrower and shotgun, but with a very short range (3 meters or less), and only one shot (some were designed for two shots)
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Great Turkish Bombard
The Dardanelles Gun[3] or Great Turkish Bombard[2] (Turkish: Şahi topu or simply Şahi) is a 15th-century siege cannon, specifically a super-sized bombard, which saw action in the 1807 Dardanelles Operation.[4] It was designed and built in 1464 by Turkish military engineer Munir Ali.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 Sources 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Dardanelles Gun was cast in bronze in 1464 by Munir Ali with a weight of 16.8 t and a length of 5.18 m (17.0 ft), being capable of firing stone balls of up to 0.63 m diameter (24.8 in).[1] The powder chamber and the barrel are connected by the way of a screw mechanism, allowing easier transport of the unwieldy device. Such super-sized bombards had been employed in Western European siege warfare since the beginning of the 15th century.[5] According to Schmidtchen, they were introduced to the Ottoman army in 1453 by the gun founder Orban (from Brassó, Kingdom of Hungary) on the occa
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Canon (other)
Canon may refer to:Contents1 Religion1.1 Scriptures 1.2 Religious law2 Arts and media2.1 Literature 2.2 Film, television, and video 2.3 Music 2.4 Other media3 Companies 4 Places 5 Other uses 6 See alsoReligion[edit] Scriptures[edit]Various formally approved collections of scriptures, including:Biblical canon, among various Jewish and Christian communities Chinese Buddhist canon, used in East Asia Jewish Bible canon, another name for the Tanakh Pāli Canon, used in the Therevada Buddhist tradition Taoist canon (Daozang), about 1400 texts collected around the 4th century Tibetan Buddhist canon, a loosely defined list used in the Vajrayana traditionCanon (hymnography), a kind of hymn in Eastern Orthodox Christianity Canon (priest), a title of certain Christian priests Canons regular, priests living in community under a rule Canon of the Mass, the Eucharistic Prayer of the Roman Rite Gospel canon, a work attempting to ha
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Mortar (weapon)
A mortar is an indirect fire device that launches projectiles at ranges from 70 meters to 14,000 meters. The mortar has traditionally been used as a weapon to propel explosive shells called mortar rounds in high-arcing ballistic trajectories. The weapon is typically muzzle-loading with a short, often smooth-bore barrel, generally less than 15 times its caliber. Modern mortars are light and easily portable. They can be used for close fire support with a variety of ammunition.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Modern portable mortar 1.3 Largest mortars 1.4 Improvised mortars2 Function 3 Design3.1 Distinctive features of mortars 3.2 Spigot mortar 3.3 Gun-mortars4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Mortars have been used for hundreds of years, originally in siege warfare. Many historians consider the first mortars to have been used at the 1453 siege of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror
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Caliber
In guns, particularly firearms, caliber or calibre is the approximate internal diameter of the gun barrel, or the diameter of the projectile it shoots. It is measured in hundredths or thousandths of an inch or in millimetres. For example, a ".45 caliber" firearm has a barrel diameter of roughly 0.45 inches (11 mm). Barrel diameters can also be expressed using metric dimensions. For example, a "9mm pistol" has a barrel diameter of about 9 millimetres (it is rare for the actual barrel diameter to precisely match the designation however, and the bullet itself is yet another dimension). When the barrel diameter is given in inches, the abbreviation "cal" (for "caliber") can be used
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Battlespace
Battlespace
Battlespace
is a term used to signify a unified military strategy to integrate and combine armed forces for the military theatre of operations, including air, information, land, sea, cyber and space to achieve military goals. It includes the environment, factors, and conditions that must be understood to successfully apply combat power, protect the force, or complete the mission
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Aerial Warfare
Aerial warfare is the battlespace use of military aircraft and other flying machines in warfare
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Yuan Dynasty
The Yuan dynasty
Yuan dynasty
(/juːˈɑːn/;[4] Chinese: 元朝; pinyin: Yuán Cháo), officially the Great Yuan[5] (Chinese: 大元; pinyin: Dà Yuán; Yehe Yuan Ulus[b]), was the empire or ruling dynasty of China established by Kublai Khan, leader of the Mongolian Borjigin
Borjigin
clan. It followed the Song dynasty
Song dynasty
and was succeeded by the Ming dynasty. Although the Mongols
Mongols
had ruled territories including modern-day North China
China
for decades, it was not until 1271 that Kublai Khan
Kublai Khan
officially proclaimed the dynasty in the traditional Chinese style,[6] and the conquest was not complete until 1279
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Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
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Ottoman Empire
The Ottoman Empire (/ˈɒtəmən/; Devlet-i ʿAlīye-i ʿOsmānīye[dn 5]), also historically known in Western Europe
Europe
as the Turkish Empire[8] or simply Turkey,[9] was a state that controlled much of southeastern Europe, western Asia and northern Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia
Anatolia
in the town of Söğüt (modern-day Bilecik Province) by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman.[10] After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman Beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire
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Carronade
A carronade is a short, smoothbore, cast iron cannon which was used by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and first produced by the Carron Company, an ironworks in Falkirk, Scotland, UK. It was used from the 1770s to the 1850s. Its main function was to serve as a powerful, short-range, anti-ship and anti-crew weapon.[1] Carronades were initially found to be very successful, but they eventually disappeared as naval artillery advanced, with the introduction of rifling and consequent change in the shape of the projectile, exploding shells replacing solid shot, and naval engagements being fought at longer ranges.Contents1 History1.1 Theory of design 1.2 Early use2 Design 3 Ordnance 4 Range 5 Diagram 6 Citations and referencesHistory[edit]68-pounder British naval carronade, with slider carriage, on HMS VictoryThe carronade was designed as a short-range naval weapon with a low muzzle velocity for merchant ships, but it also found a niche role on warships
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Limbers And Caissons
A limber is a two-wheeled cart designed to support the trail of an artillery piece, or the stock of a field carriage such as a caisson or traveling forge, allowing it to be towed. The trail is the hinder end of the stock of a gun-carriage, which rests or slides on the ground when the carriage is unlimbered.[1] A caisson is a two-wheeled cart designed to carry artillery ammunition.[2] The British term was "ammunition wagon". Caissons are used to bear the casket of the deceased in some state and military funerals in certain Western cultures, including the United States.Contents1 Before the 19th century 2 Nineteenth century 3 20th century 4 Caissons in American and British culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksBefore the 19th century[edit]Limber (left) and gun, ca. 1461As artillery pieces developed trunnions and were placed on carriages featuring two wheels and a trail, a limber was devised. This was a simple cart with a pintle
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
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