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Cannabicyclol
Cannabicyclol
Cannabicyclol
(CBL) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in Cannabis. CBL is a degradative product like cannabinol[citation needed]. Light converts cannabichromene into CBL[citation needed]. It has 16 stereoisomers
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Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System
The Anatomical Therapeutic
Therapeutic
Chemical (ATC) Classification System
System
is used for the classification of active ingredients of drugs according to the organ or system on which they act and their therapeutic, pharmacological and chemical properties. It is controlled by the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Drug
Drug
Statistics Methodology (WHOCC), and was first published in 1976.[1] This pharmaceutical coding system divides drugs into different groups according to the organ or system on which they act or their therapeutic and chemical characteristics. Each bottom-level ATC code stands for a pharmaceutically used substance, or a combination of substances, in a single indication (or use)
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Arachidonoyl Serotonin
Arachidonoyl serotonin
Arachidonoyl serotonin
(N-arachidonoyl-serotonin, AA-5-HT) is an endogenous lipid signaling molecule. It was first described in 1998 as being an inhibitor of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH).[1] In 2007, it was shown to have analgesic properties and to act as an antagonist of the TRPV1
TRPV1
receptor.[2] In 2011, it was shown to be present in the ileum and jejunum of the gastrointestinal tract and modulate glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) secretion.[3] References[edit]^ Bisogno, T.; Melck, D.; De Petrocellis, L.; Bobrov, M. U.; Gretskaya, N. M.; Bezuglov, V. V.; Sitachitta, N.; Gerwick, W. H.; Di Marzo, V. (1998). "Arachidonoylserotonin and other novel inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase". Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. 248 (3): 515–522. doi:10.1006/bbrc.1998.8874. PMID 9703957.  ^ Maione, S.; De Petrocellis, L.; De Novellis, V.; Moriello, A
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Gallocatechol
Gallocatechol
Gallocatechol
or gallocatechin (GC) is a flavan-3-ol, a type of chemical compound including catechin, with the gallate residue being in an isomeric trans position. It is one of the antioxidant chemicals found in food. This compound possesses two epimers. The most common, (+)-gallocatechin (GC), CAS number 970-73-0, is found notably in green tea. Other sources of (+)-gallocatechin are bananas,[1] persimmons and pomegranates.[citation needed] The other enantiomer is called (-)-gallocatechin or ent-gallocatechin. It was first isolated from green tea by Michiyo Tsujimura
Michiyo Tsujimura
in 1934.[2] This compound had been shown to have moderate affinity to the human cannabinoid receptor,[3] which may contribute to the health benefits found by consuming green tea. Epigallocatechin
Epigallocatechin
is another type of catechin, with the gallate residue being in an isomeric cis position
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Epigallocatechin Gallate
Epigallocatechin
Epigallocatechin
gallate (EGCG), also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is the ester of epigallocatechin and gallic acid, and is a type of catechin. EGCG, the most abundant catechin in tea, is a polyphenol under basic research for its potential to affect human health and disease
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Endocannabinoid
The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a biological system composed of endocannabinoids, which are endogenous lipid-based retrograde neurotransmitters that bind to cannabinoid receptors, and cannabinoid receptor proteins that are expressed throughout the mammalian central nervous system (including the brain) and peripheral nervous system. The endocannabinoid system is involved in regulating a variety of physiological and cognitive processes including fertility,[1] pregnancy,[2] during pre- and postnatal development,[3] appetite, pain-sensation, mood, and memory, and in mediating the pharmacological effects of cannabis.[4][5] The ECS is also involved in mediating some of the physiological and cognitive effects of voluntary physical exercise in humans and other animals, such as contributing to exercise-induced euphoria as well as modulating locomotor activity and motivational salience for rewards.[6][7][8][9] In humans, the plasma concentration of certain endocannabinoids (i.e., anandamide)
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Regulation Of Therapeutic Goods
The regulation of therapeutic goods, that is drugs and therapeutic devices, varies by jurisdiction. In some countries, such as the United States, they are regulated at the national level by a single agency. In other jurisdictions they are regulated at the state level, or at both state and national levels by various bodies, as is the case in Australia. The role of therapeutic goods regulation is designed mainly to protect the health and safety of the population. Regulation is aimed at ensuring the safety, quality, and efficacy of the therapeutic goods which are covered under the scope of the regulation. In most jurisdictions, therapeutic goods must be registered before they are allowed to be marketed
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Caryophyllene
Caryophyllene
Caryophyllene
/ˌkærioʊfɪˈliːn/, or (−)-β-caryophyllene, is a natural bicyclic sesquiterpene that is a constituent of many essential oils, especially clove oil, the oil from the stems and flowers of Syzygium aromaticum
Syzygium aromaticum
(cloves),[3] the essential oil of Cannabis
Cannabis
sativa, rosemary,[4] and hops.[5] It is usually found as a mixture with isocaryophyllene (the cis double bond isomer) and α-humulene (obsolete name: α-caryophyllene), a ring-opened isomer. Caryophyllene is notable for having a cyclobutane ring, as well as a trans-double bond in a 9-membered ring, both rarities in nature. The first total synthesis of caryophyllene in 1964 by E.J. Corey
E.J

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Echinacea
Brauneria Necker ex T.C.Porter & Britton Helichroa Raf. Echinacea
Echinacea
/ˌɛkɪˈneɪʃiə/[1] is a genus, or group of herbaceous flowering plants in the daisy family. The Echinacea
Echinacea
genus has nine species, which are commonly called coneflowers. They are found only in eastern and central North America, where they grow in moist to dry prairies and open wooded areas. They have large, showy heads of composite flowers, blooming from early to late summer. The generic name is derived from the Greek word ἐχῖνος (ekhinos), meaning "hedgehog," due to the spiny central disk. These flowering plants and their parts have different uses. Some species are cultivated in gardens for their showy flowers. Echinacea purpurea
Echinacea purpurea
is used in folk medicine.[2] Two of the species, E. tennesseensis and E
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Erowid
Erowid, also called Erowid Center, is a 501(c)(3) non-profit educational organization that provides information about psychoactive plants and chemicals as well as activities and technologies that can produce altered states of consciousness such as meditation, lucid dreaming, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and electroceuticals. Erowid documents legal and illegal substances, including their intended and adverse effects. Information on Erowid's website is gathered from diverse sources including published literature, experts in related fields, and the experiences of the general public
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Comparative Toxicogenomics Database
The Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) is a public website and research tool launched in November 2004 that curates scientific data describing relationships between chemicals/drugs, genes/proteins, diseases, taxa, phenotypes, GO annotations, pathways, and interaction modules
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2-Oleoylglycerol
2-Oleoylglycerol
2-Oleoylglycerol
(2OG) is a monoacylglycerol that is found in biologic tissues. Its synthesis is derived from diacylglycerol precursors. It is metabolized to oleic acid and glycerol primarily by the enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL).[1] In 2011, 2OG was found to be an endogenous ligand to GPR119.[2] 2OG has been shown to increase glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) levels following administration to the small intestine.[2] See also[edit]2-Arachidonoylglycerol JZL184References[edit]^ Dinh, T. P.; Carpenter, D.; Leslie, F. M.; Freund, T. F.; Katona, I.; Sensi, S. L.; Kathuria, S.; Piomelli, D. (2002). "Brain monoglyceride lipase participating in endocannabinoid inactivation". Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 99 (16): 10819–10824. doi:10.1073/pnas.152334899. PMC 125056 . PMID 12136125.  ^ a b Hansen, K. B.; Rosenkilde, M. M.; Knop, F. K.; Wellner, N.; Diep, T
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N-Arachidonoyl Dopamine
Dopamine
Dopamine
(DA, a contraction of 3,4-dihydroxyphenethylamine) is an organic chemical of the catecholamine and phenethylamine families that plays several important roles in the brain and body. It is an amine synthesized by removing a carboxyl group from a molecule of its precursor chemical L-DOPA, which is synthesized in the brain and kidneys. Dopamine
Dopamine
is also synthesized in plants and most animals. In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by neurons (nerve cells) to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine pathways, one of which plays a major role in the motivational component of reward-motivated behavior. The anticipation of most types of rewards increase the level of dopamine in the brain,[2] and many addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity
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Convention On Psychotropic Substances
The Convention on Psychotropic Substances
Convention on Psychotropic Substances
of 1971 is a United Nations treaty designed to control psychoactive drugs such as amphetamine-type stimulants, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, and psychedelics signed in Vienna, Austria
Austria
on 21 February 1971. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs of 1961 did not ban the many newly discovered psychotropics,[1] since its scope was limited to drugs with cannabis, coca, and opium-like effects. During the 1960s such drugs became widely available, and government authorities opposed this for numerous reasons, arguing that along with negative health effects, drug use led to lowered moral standards. The Convention, which contains import and export restrictions and other rules aimed at limiting drug use to scientific and medical purposes, came into force on 16 August 1976. As of 2013, 183 member states are Parties to the treaty
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N-Arachidonylglycine
N-ArachidonylglycineNamesIUPAC name (5Z,8Z,11Z,14Z)-N-Icosa-5,8,11,14-tetraenoylamino-acetic acidOther names N-Arachidonylglycine Arachidonoyl glycine NA-glycineIdentifiersCAS Number179113-91-8 N3D model (JSmol)Interactive image Interactive imageBeilstein Reference7652004ChEBICHEBI:58961 YChEMBLChEMBL161343 YChemSpider4446510 YMeSH Anandamide PubChem CID5283389InChIKey: LGEQQWMQCRIYKG-DOFZRALJSA-N YInChI=1/C22H37NO2/c1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16-17-18-19-22(25)23-20-21-24/h6-7,9-10,12-13,15-16,24H,2-5,8,11,14,17-21H2,1H3,(H,23,25)/b7-6-,10-9-,13-12-,16-15- Key: YLEARPUNMCCKMP-DOFZRALJSA-NInChI=1S/C22H35NO3/c1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12-13-14-15-16
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Docosatetraenoylethanolamide
Docosatetraenoylethanolamide
Docosatetraenoylethanolamide
(DEA) is an endogenous ethanolamide that has been shown to act on the cannabinoid (CB1) receptor.[1] DEA is similar in structure to anandamide (AEA, a recognized endogenous ligand for the CB1 receptor), containing docosatetraenoic acid in place of arachidonic acid. While DEA has been shown to bind to the CB1 receptor with similar potency and efficacy as AEA, its role as a cannabinergic neurotransmitter is not well understood. References[edit]^ Hanus, L.; Gopher, A.; Almog, S.; et al. (1993). "Two new unsaturated fatty acid ethanolamides in brain that bind to the cannabinoid receptor". J Med Chem. 36 (20): 3032–3034. doi:10.1021/jm00072a026
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