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British Land
The British Land
British Land
Company plc is one of the largest property development and investment companies in the United Kingdom. The firm became a real estate investment trust when REITs were introduced in the UK in January 2007. It is headquartered in London. It is listed on the London Stock Exchange
London Stock Exchange
and is a constituent of the FTSE 100 Index and a founding member of the European Public Real Estate Association.Contents1 History 2 Operations 3 Main projects 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The British Land
British Land
Company was founded in 1856 as an offshoot of the National Freehold Land Society (later Abbey National) formed in 1849 with the two chief architects of the freehold land movement Richard Cobden and John Bright. Both were ardent supporters of a movement to extend enfranchisement
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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List Of Tallest Buildings In Europe
This list of tallest buildings in Europe
Europe
ranks skyscrapers in Europe by height. For decades, only a few major cities, such as Frankfurt, London, Paris, Istanbul, Warsaw
Warsaw
and Moscow, contained skyscrapers. In recent years, however, construction has spread to many other cities on the continent, including Barcelona, Brussels, Lisbon, Lyon, Madrid, Manchester, Milan, Naples, Rotterdam, Valencia
Valencia
and others
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City Of London
The City of London
London
is a city and county that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London
London
from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders.[3][4] The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London
London
is not a London
London
borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts (including London's only other city, the City of Westminster)
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Richard Rogers
Richard George Rogers (1933-07-23) 23 July 1933 (age 84) Florence, ItalyFurther informationNationality British, ItalianAlma mater Architectural Association School of Architecture, Yale School of ArchitectureOccupation ArchitectAwardsRIBA Gold Medal (1985) Thomas Jefferson Medal (1999) Praemium Imperiale
Praemium Imperiale
(2000) Stir
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Warren Street Tube Station
Warren Street
Warren Street
is a London Underground
London Underground
station, located at the intersection of Tottenham Court Road
Tottenham Court Road
and Euston Road, named after Warren Street. It is on the Charing Cross branch of the Northern line, between Goodge Street and Euston, and the Victoria line
Victoria line
between Oxford Circus and Euston. It is in Travelcard Zone 1
Travelcard Zone 1
and is the nearest tube station to University College Hospital, being opposite the newly opened main building
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Asda
Asda
Asda
Stores Ltd. trading as Asda, is a British supermarket retailer, headquartered in Leeds, West Yorkshire.[5] The company was founded in 1965 when the supermarket owning Asquith family merged with the Associated Dairies company of Yorkshire. It expanded in to the south of England during the 1970s and 1980s, and acquired Allied Carpets, 61 large Gateway Supermarkets and other businesses, such as MFI, then during the 1990s, sold off its acquisitions to concentrate on the supermarkets
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Public Limited Company
A public limited company (legally abbreviated to plc) is a type of public company under the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
company law, some Commonwealth jurisdictions, and the Republic of Ireland. It is a limited liability company whose shares may be freely sold and traded to the public (although a plc may also be privately held, often by another plc), with a minimum share capital of £50,000 and usually with the letters PLC after its name.[1] Similar companies in the United States are called publicly traded companies. Public limited companies will also have a separate legal identity. A PLC can be either an unlisted or listed company on the stock exchanges. In the United Kingdom, a public limited company usually must include the words "public limited company" or the abbreviation "PLC" or "plc" at the end and as part of the legal company name
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Sheffield
Sheffield
Sheffield
(/ˈʃɛfiːəld/ ( listen)) is a city and metropolitan borough in South Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, its name derives from the River Sheaf, which runs through the city. With some of its southern suburbs annexed from Derbyshire, the city has grown from its largely industrial roots to encompass a wider economic base. The population of the City of Sheffield
Sheffield
is 575,400 (mid-2016 est.)[2] and it is one of the eight largest regional English cities that make up the Core Cities Group.[3] Sheffield
Sheffield
is the third largest English district by population. The metropolitan population of Sheffield
Sheffield
is 1,569,000.[1] The city is in the eastern foothills of the Pennines, and the valleys of the River Don and its four tributaries, the Loxley, the Porter Brook, the Rivelin and the Sheaf
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John Bright
John Bright
John Bright
(16 November 1811 – 27 March 1889) was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, one of the greatest orators of his generation and a promoter of free trade policies. A Quaker, Bright is most famous for battling the Corn Laws. In partnership with Richard Cobden, he founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the Corn Laws, which raised food prices and protected landowners' interests by levying taxes on imported wheat. The Corn Laws
Corn Laws
were repealed in 1846. Bright also worked with Cobden in another free trade initiative, the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty
Cobden–Chevalier Treaty
of 1860, promoting closer interdependence between Britain and France
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Richard Cobden
Richard Cobden
Richard Cobden
(3 June 1804 – 2 April 1865) was an English manufacturer and Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with two major free trade campaigns, the Anti-Corn Law League
Anti-Corn Law League
and the Cobden–Chevalier Treaty. As a young man, Cobden was a successful commercial traveller who became co-owner of a highly profitable calico printing factory in Manchester, a city with which he would become strongly identified. However, he soon found himself more engaged in politics, and his travels convinced him of the virtues of free trade (anti-protection) as the key to better international relations. In 1838, he and John Bright
John Bright
founded the Anti-Corn Law League, aimed at abolishing the unpopular Corn Laws, which protected landowners’ interests by levying taxes on imported wheat, thus raising the price of bread
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Real Estate Development
Real estate
Real estate
development, or property development, is a business process, encompassing activities that range from the renovation and re-lease of existing buildings to the purchase of raw land and the sale of developed land or parcels to others. Real estate
Real estate
developers are the people and companies who coordinate all of these activities, converting ideas from paper to real property.[1] Real estate development is different from construction, although many developers also manage the construction process. Developers buy land, finance real estate deals, build or have builders build projects, create, imagine, control, and orchestrate the process of development from the beginning to end.[2] Developers usually take the greatest risk in the creation or renovation of real estate—and receive the greatest rewards
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European Public Real Estate Association
The European Public Real Estate Association (EPRA), is a non-profit association representing Europe's publicly listed property companies. It is run by an independent Board of Directors[1] chaired by Christophe Cuvillier,[2] CEO of Unibail-Rodamco.Contents1 History 2 Activities 3 External links 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] From its formation in Amsterdam in 1999, partnering initially with Euronext and later with FTSE[3] and NAREIT,[4] the three bodies established the FTSE EPRA/NAREIT Global Index series[5] which is now used as the global indices platform from which to benchmark the performance of stock exchange-quoted property companies and real estate investment trusts
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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