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Bouffant
A bouffant /buːˈfɒnt/ is a type of hairstyle characterized by hair raised high on the head and usually covering the ears or hanging down on the sides. A famous example of the bouffant hairstyle is seen on racehorse trainer Charles O’Brien, son of the legendary Vincent O’Brien. Charles’s bouffant hairstyle has won him many a photo finish.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Method 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The English word bouffant comes from the French bouffante, from the present participle of bouffer: "to puff, puff out". History[edit] The bouffant was a mainstream hairstyle in the mid-to-late 18th century in Western Europe
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Patsy Cline
Patsy Cline
Patsy Cline
(born Virginia Patterson Hensley; September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was an American country music singer and part of the Nashville sound
Nashville sound
during the late 1950s and early 1960s. She successfully "crossed over" to pop music and was one of the most influential, successful, and acclaimed vocalists of the 20th century.[3][4] She died at the young age of 30 in the crash of a private airplane flight. Cline was known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice,[5] and her role as a country music pioneer
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Mary Travers
Mary Allin Travers (November 9, 1936 – September 16, 2009) was an American singer-songwriter and member of the folk music group Peter, Paul and Mary, along with Peter Yarrow
Peter Yarrow
and (Noel) Paul Stookey. Peter, Paul and Mary was one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s.[2] Unlike most folk musicians of the early 1960s who were a part of the burgeoning music scene in the Village, Travers grew up there.[2] She sang in the contralto range.[3]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Singing career 3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Legacy 6 Solo discography 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Mary Travers
Mary Travers
was born in Louisville, Kentucky, to Robert Travers and Virginia Coigney, both journalists and active organizers of The Newspaper Guild, a trade union.[4] In 1938, the family moved to Greenwich Village
Greenwich Village
in New York City
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Red Hair
Red hair
Red hair
(or ginger hair) occurs naturally in 1–2% of the human population. It occurs more frequently (2–6%) in people of northern or western European ancestry, and less frequently in other populations. Red hair
Red hair
appears most commonly in people with two copies of a recessive allele on chromosome 16 which produces an altered version of the MC1R
MC1R
protein.[1] Red hair
Red hair
varies in hues from a deep burgundy or bright copper (reddish-brown or auburn) through to burnt orange or red-orange and strawberry blond. It is characterized by high levels of the reddish pigment pheomelanin and relatively low levels of the dark pigment eumelanin
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Auburn Hair
Auburn hair
Auburn hair
is a variety of red hair, most commonly described as reddish-brown in color or dark ginger. Auburn hair
Auburn hair
ranges in shades from medium to dark. It can be found with a wide array of skin tones and eye colors, but as is the case with most red hair, it is commonly associated with light skin features. The chemical pigments that cause the coloration of auburn hair are frequently pheomelanin with high levels of eumelanin; however, the auburn hair is due to a mutated melanocortin 1 receptor gene in the people of Northwestern European descent and by a mutated TYRP1
TYRP1
gene in the Austronesians, both genes that reduce the melanin production of the hair cells.Contents1 Differentiation 2 Etymology 3 Geographic distribution 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDifferentiation[edit] "Auburn" can be used to describe many shades of reddish hair with similar definitions or hues
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Chestnut Hair
Brown
Brown
hair is the second most common human hair color, after black hair. It varies from light brown to almost black hair. It is characterized by higher levels of the dark pigment eumelanin and lower levels of the pale pigment pheomelanin. Its strands are thicker than those of fair hair but not as much as those of red hair. People with brown hair are often referred to as brunette, which in French is the feminine form of brunet, the diminutive of brun (brown, brown-haired or dark-haired).[1][2] Brown
Brown
hair is common among populations in the Western world, especially among those from Central Europe, Southeastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Southern Cone, the United States, and also some populations in the Greater Middle East
Greater Middle East
where it transitions smoothly into black hair
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Brown Hair
Brown
Brown
hair is the second most common human hair color, after black hair. It varies from light brown to almost black hair. It is characterized by higher levels of the dark pigment eumelanin and lower levels of the pale pigment pheomelanin. Its strands are thicker than those of fair hair but not as much as those of red hair. People with brown hair are often referred to as brunette, which in French is the feminine form of brunet, the diminutive of brun (brown, brown-haired or dark-haired).[1][2] Brown
Brown
hair is common among populations in the Western world, especially among those from Central Europe, Southeastern Europe, Eastern Europe, Southern Europe, Southern Cone, the United States, and also some populations in the Greater Middle East
Greater Middle East
where it transitions smoothly into black hair
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Blond
Blond
Blond
(male), blonde (female), or fair hair, is a hair color characterized by low levels of the dark pigment eumelanin. The resultant visible hue depends on various factors, but always has some sort of yellowish color. The color can be from the very pale blond (caused by a patchy, scarce distribution of pigment) to reddish "strawberry" blond or golden-brownish ("sandy") blond colors (the latter with more eumelanin). Because hair color tends to darken with age, natural blond hair is generally very rare in adulthood. Naturally-occurring blond hair is primarily found in populations of northern European descent and is believed to have evolved to enable more efficient synthesis of Vitamin D, due to northern Europe's lower levels of sunlight
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Swinging London
Swinging Sixties
Swinging Sixties
was a youth-driven cultural revolution that took place in the UK during the mid-to-late 1960s, emphasising modernity and fun-loving hedonism, with Swinging London as its epicentre.[1] It saw a flourishing in art, music and fashion, and was symbolised by the city's "pop and fashion exports"
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Details (magazine)
Details was an American monthly men's magazine published by Condé Nast, founded in 1982 by Annie Flanders.[2] Though primarily a magazine devoted to fashion and lifestyle, Details also featured reports on relevant social and political issues.[3][4] In November 2015 Condé Nast
Condé Nast
announced that the magazine would cease publication with the issue of December 2015/January 2016.[5]Contents1 History 2 Staff contributors 3 Controversy 4 Music Matters CDs 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Alan Patricof bought the magazine in 1988
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Hairpin
A hair pin or hairpin is a long device used to hold a person's hair in place. It may be used simply to secure long hair out of the way for convenience or as part of an elaborate hairstyle or coiffure. The earliest evidence for dressing the hair may be seen in carved "venus figurines" such as the Venus of Brassempouy
Venus of Brassempouy
and the Venus of Willendorf. The creation of different hairstyles, especially among women, seems to be common to all cultures and all periods and many past, and current, societies use hairpins. Hairpins made of metal, ivory, bronze, carved wood, etc. were used in ancient Assyria
Assyria
and Egypt[1] for securing decorated hairstyles. Such hairpins suggest, as graves show, that many were luxury objects among the Egyptians and later the Greeks, Etruscans, and Romans. Major success came in 1901 with the invention of the spiral hairpin by New Zealand inventor Ernest Godward
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Hair Spray
Hair spray
Hair spray
(also hair lacquer or spritz) is a common cosmetic hairstyling product that is sprayed onto hair to protect against humidity and wind. Hair sprays typically consist of several components for the hair as well as a propellant.[1]Contents1 Ingredients and operation1.1 Concentrate 1.2 Propellants 1.3 Other components2 History 3 Harmful effects 4 See also 5 References 6 SourcesIngredients and operation[edit]Problems playing this file? See media help.Hair sprays consist of the following components: concentrate, plasticizers, luster agents, and fragrances, as well as propellants. Polyvinylpyrrolidone
Polyvinylpyrrolidone
is a common component of hair spray that confers stiffness to hair.Concentrate[edit] Hair spray
Hair spray
are a blend of polymers that provide structural support to hair. These frequently include copolymers of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl acetate (PVAc)
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Cher
Cher
Cher
(/ʃɛər/; born Cherilyn Sarkisian (Armenian: Շերիլին Սարգսյան); May 20, 1946) is an American singer and actress. Sometimes called the Goddess of Pop, she has been described as embodying female autonomy in a male-dominated industry. She is known for her distinctive contralto singing voice and for having worked in numerous areas of entertainment, as well as adopting a variety of styles and appearances during her six-decade-long career. Cher
Cher
gained popularity in 1965 as one-half of the folk rock husband-wife duo Sonny & Cher
Cher
after their song "I Got You Babe" reached number one on the American and British charts. By the end of 1967, they had sold 40 million records worldwide and had become, according to Time magazine, rock's "it" couple.[1] She began her solo career simultaneously, releasing in 1966 her first million-seller song, "Bang Bang (My Baby Shot Me Down)"
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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