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South Korea

South Korea's mixed economy[308][309][310] ranks 11th nominal[311] and 13th purchasing power parity GDP in the world, identifying it as one of the G-20 major economies. It is a developed country with a high-income economy and is the most industrialized member country of the OECD. South Korean brands such as LG Electronics and Samsung are internationally famous and garnered South Korea's reputation for its quality electronics and other manufactured goods.[312] Its massive investment in education has taken the country from mass illiteracy to a major international technological powerhouse
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Cha-am
Cha-am District[1] (Thai: ชะอำ, pronounced [t͡ɕʰáʔām] or[t͡ɕʰāʔām]) is a district (amphoe) in the southern part of Phetchaburi Province, western Thailand.[2] The district was established in 1897 with the name Na Yang. In 1914 the centre of the district was moved to Ban Nong Chok (now in Tha Yang District and its name was changed to Nong Chok
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Phetchaburi
Phetchaburi (Thai: เพชรบุรี, pronounced [pʰét.t͡ɕʰā.bū.rīː]) or Phet Buri (pronounced [pʰét bū.rīː]) is a town (thesaban mueang) in southern Thailand, capital of Phetchaburi Province. In Thai, Phetchaburi means "city of diamonds" (buri meaning "city" in sanskrit). It is approximately 160 km south of Bangkok, at the northern end of the Thai peninsula. As of 2005, the town had a population of 26,181 and covers the two tambon Tha Rap and Khlong Krachaeng.[1] The Phetchaburi River runs through the middle of the city. The region is mostly flat, save for a single hill (called Khao Wang) on the outskirts of town. The royal palace named Phra Nakhon Khiri and one of the many wats are on top of Khao Wang. The hill and town is the site of an annual festival, called the Phra Nakhon Khiri Fair
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Common External Tariff
A common external tariff (CET) must be introduced when a group of countries forms a customs union. The same customs duties, import quotas, preferences or other non-tariff barriers to trade apply to all goods entering the area, regardless of which country within the area they are entering. It is designed to end re-exportation; but it may also inhibit imports from countries outside the customs union and thereby diminish consumer choice and support protectionism of industries based within the customs union. The common external tariff is a mild form of economic union but may lead to further types of economic integration. In addition to having the same customs duties, the countries may have other common trade policies, such as having the same quotas, preferences or other non-tariff trade regulations apply to all goods entering the area, regardless of which country, within the area, they are entering
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