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Philip John Schuyler (; November 18, 1804) was an American general in the
Revolutionary WarRevolutionary War(s) may refer to: * American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), the armed conflict between Great Britain and 13 of its North American colonies, which had declared themselves the independent United States of America * French Revolution ...
and a
United States Senator The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress The United States Congress is the legislature of the federal government of the United States. It is Bicameralism, bicameral, comprising a lower body, the ...
from
New York New York most commonly refers to: * New York City, the most populous city in the United States, located in the state of New York * New York (state), a state in the northeastern United States New York may also refer to: Film and television * New ...
. He is usually known as Philip Schuyler, while his son is usually known as
Philip J. Schuyler
Philip J. Schuyler
. Born in
Albany Albany, derived from the Gaelic name for Scotland Scotland ( sco, Scotland, gd, Alba Alba (Scottish Gaelic Scottish Gaelic ( gd, Gàidhlig or Scots Gaelic, sometimes referred to simply as Gaelic) is a Goidelic language (in the C ...
,
Province of New York The Province of New York (1664–1776) was a British proprietary colony A proprietary colony was a type of English colony mostly in North America North America is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all w ...
, into the prosperous
Schuyler family The Schuyler family was a prominent Dutch family in New York and New Jersey in the 18th and 19th centuries, whose descendants played a critical role in the formation of the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commo ...
, Schuyler fought in the
French and Indian War The French and Indian War (1754–1763) was a theater of the Seven Years' War The Seven Years' War (1756–1763) is widely considered to be the first global conflict in history, and was a struggle for world supremacy between Great Britain ...

French and Indian War
. He won election to the
New York General Assembly The General Assembly of New York, commonly known internationally as the New York General Assembly, and domestically simply as General Assembly, was the supreme legislative body A legislature is an assembly Assembly may refer to: Organisatio ...
in 1768 and to the
Continental Congress The Continental Congress was a series of legislative bodies A legislature is a deliberative assembly A deliberative assembly is a gathering of members (of any kind of collective) who use parliamentary procedure Parliamentary procedure is ...
in 1775. He planned the
Continental Army The Continental Army was the army of the Thirteen Colonies and the Revolutionary-era United States. It was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, and was established by a resolution of ...
's 1775 Invasion of Quebec, but poor health forced him to delegate command of the invasion to
Richard Montgomery Richard Montgomery (December 2, 1738 – December 31, 1775) was an Ireland, Irish soldier who first served in the British Army. He later became a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and he is most fa ...
. He prepared the Continental Army's defense of the 1777
Saratoga campaign The Saratoga campaign in 1777 was an attempt by the British high command for North America to gain military control of the strategically important Hudson River The Hudson River is a river that flows from north to south primarily through ea ...
, but was replaced by General
Horatio Gates Horatio Lloyd Gates (July 26, 1727April 10, 1806) was a British-born American army officer who served as a general in the Continental Army The Continental Army was the army of the Thirteen Colonies and the Revolutionary-era United States ...

Horatio Gates
as the commander of Continental forces in the theater. Schuyler resigned from the Continental Army in 1779. Schuyler served in the
New York State Senate The New York State Senate is the upper house of the New York State Legislature The New York State Legislature consists of the two houses that act as the state legislature A state legislature is a Legislature, legislative branch or body of ...

New York State Senate
for most of the 1780s and supported the ratification of the
United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law A constitution is an aggregate of fundamental principles or established precedents that constitute the legal basis of a polity, organisation An organization, or orga ...

United States Constitution
. He represented New York in the
1st United States Congress The 1st United States Congress, comprising the United States Senate The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress The United States Congress is the legislature A legislature is an deliberativ ...
but lost his state's 1791 Senate election to
Aaron Burr Aaron Burr Jr. (February 6, 1756 – September 14, 1836) was an American politician and lawyer. He served as the third vice president of the United States The vice president of the United States (VPOTUS) is the second-highest officer in ...

Aaron Burr
. After a period in the state senate, he won election to the United States Senate again in 1797, affiliating with the
Federalist Party The Federalist Party was the first political party in the United States American electoral politics has been dominated by two major political parties since shortly after the founding of the republic. Since the 1850s, they have been the Histo ...
. He resigned due to poor health the following year. He was the father of
Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton Elizabeth Hamilton (née Schuyler ; August 9, 1757 – November 9, 1854), also called Eliza or Betsey, was a socialite and philanthropist. Married to American Founding Father The following list of national founding figures is a record, by ...

Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton
and the father-in-law of
Secretary of the Treasury The United States secretary of the treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is the national treasury A treasury is either *A government department related to finance and t ...
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was an American statesman, politician, legal scholar, military commander, lawyer, banker, and economist. He was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States The Founding Fa ...

Alexander Hamilton
.


Early life

Philip John Schuyler was born on in
Albany, New York Albany ( ) is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller low ...
, to
Cornelia Van Cortlandt Johannes Schuyler Jr. (October 1697 – November 5, 1741) was a prominent American of Dutch ancestry who served as the Mayor of Albany, Mayor of Albany, New York from 1740 to 1741, and was a merchant, alderman, and Indian commissioner. Schuyler ma ...
(1698–1762) and Johannes ("John") Schuyler Jr. (1697–1741), the third generation of the Dutch
Schuyler family The Schuyler family was a prominent Dutch family in New York and New Jersey in the 18th and 19th centuries, whose descendants played a critical role in the formation of the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commo ...
in America. His maternal grandfather was
Stephanus Van Cortlandt Stephanus van Cortlandt (May 7, 1643 – November 25, 1700) was the first native-born mayor of New York City The mayor of New York City, officially Mayor of the City of New York, is head of the executive branch of the Government of New York ...
, the 17th
Mayor of New York City The mayor of New York City, officially Mayor of the City of New York, is head of the executive branch of the Government of New York City. The Mayoralty in the United States, mayor's office administers all city services, public property, police ...
. Before his father died on the eve of his eighth birthday, Schuyler attended the public school in Albany. Afterward, he was educated by tutors at the
Van Cortlandt family The Van Cortlandt family was an influential political dynasty from the seventeenth-century Netherlands, Dutch origins of New York (state), New York through its period as an English colony, then after it became a state, and into the nineteenth cent ...
estate at
New Rochelle New Rochelle (; older french: La Nouvelle-Rochelle) is a Political subdivisions of New York State#City, city in Westchester County, New York, United States, in the southeastern portion of the state. In 2010, the city had a population of 77,062 ...
. Fluent in both Dutch and English from childhood, in 1748 he began to study with Reverend Peter Strouppe at the New Rochelle French Protestant Church, where he learned French and mathematics. While he was at New Rochelle he also joined numerous trade expeditions where he met
Iroquois The Iroquois ( or ) or Haudenosaunee (; "People of the Longhouse") are an indigenous Indigenous may refer to: *Indigenous peoples Indigenous peoples, also referred to as First people, Aboriginal people, Native people, or autochthonous pe ...

Iroquois
leaders and learned to speak
MohawkMohawk may refer to: Related to Native Americans *Mohawk people, an indigenous people of North America (Canada and New York) *Mohawk language, the language spoken by the Mohawk people *Mohawk hairstyle, from a hairstyle once thought to have been tr ...
. Schuyler joined the British forces in 1755 during the
French and Indian War The French and Indian War (1754–1763) was a theater of the Seven Years' War The Seven Years' War (1756–1763) is widely considered to be the first global conflict in history, and was a struggle for world supremacy between Great Britain ...

French and Indian War
, raised a company, and was commissioned as its
captain Captain is a title for the commander of a military unit, the commander of a ship, aeroplane, spacecraft, or other vessel, or the commander of a port, fire department or police department, election precinct, etc. The captain is a military rank in a ...
by his cousin, Lieutenant Governor
James Delancey James De Lancey (November 27, 1703 – July 30, 1760) served as chief justice, lieutenant governor, and acting colonial governor of the Province of New York. Early life and education De Lancey was born in New York City on November 27, 170 ...
. In 1756, he accompanied British officer Colonel
John Bradstreet Major General John Bradstreet, born Jean-Baptiste Bradstreet (21 December 1714 – 25 September 1774) was a British Army officer during King George's War, the French and Indian War, and Pontiac's War. He was born in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia to ...

John Bradstreet
to Oswego, where he gained experience as a quartermaster, which ended when the outpost fell to the French. Schuyler took part in the battles of Lake George, Oswego River,
Carillon A carillon ( or ; ) is a Pitched percussion instrument, pitched percussion idiophone that is played with a keyboard instrument, keyboard and consists of at least 23 bellfounding, cast bell metal, bronze bells in fixed suspension and tuned ...
and
Fort Frontenac Fort Frontenac was a French trading post A trading post, trading station, or trading house, also known as a factory, was an establishment or settlement where goods and services could be traded. Typically the location of the trading post would ...

Fort Frontenac
. After the war, Bradstreet sent Schuyler to England to settle Bradstreet's reimbursement claims for expenses he incurred during the war effort, and he remained in England from 1760 to 1763. After returning to the United States he took over management of several farms and business enterprises in upstate New York, including a lumber venture in Saratoga. In addition, Schuyler was responsible for constructing the first flax mill in the American colonies. In 1768, he served as a member of the New York Assembly.


American Revolution

Schuyler was elected to the
Continental Congress The Continental Congress was a series of legislative bodies A legislature is a deliberative assembly A deliberative assembly is a gathering of members (of any kind of collective) who use parliamentary procedure Parliamentary procedure is ...
in 1775, and served until he was appointed a major general of the
Continental Army The Continental Army was the army of the Thirteen Colonies and the Revolutionary-era United States. It was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the American Revolutionary War, and was established by a resolution of ...
in June. General Schuyler took command of the
Northern Department The Northern Department was a department of the government of the Kingdom of England from 1660 to 1707 and later the Kingdom of Great Britain from 1707 until 1782 when its functions were reorganised into the new Home Office and Foreign Office. His ...
, and planned the
Invasion of Quebec (1775) The Invasion of Quebec (June 1775 – October 1776, french: Invasion du Québec) was the first major military initiative by the newly formed Continental Army The Continental Army was the army of the Thirteen Colonies and the Revolutionary ...
. His poor health required him to place
Richard Montgomery Richard Montgomery (December 2, 1738 – December 31, 1775) was an Ireland, Irish soldier who first served in the British Army. He later became a major general in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and he is most fa ...
in command of the invasion. In 1777, he again served in the Continental Congress.


Saratoga campaign

After returning to command of the Northern Department in 1777, Schuyler was active in preparing a defense against the
Saratoga Campaign The Saratoga campaign in 1777 was an attempt by the British high command for North America to gain military control of the strategically important Hudson River The Hudson River is a river that flows from north to south primarily through ea ...
, part of the "Three Pronged Attack" strategy of the British to cut the American Colonies in two by invading and occupying New York State. In the summer of 1777, John Burgoyne marched his British force south from Quebec and through the valleys of Lakes Champlain and George. On the way he invested the small Colonial garrison occupying Fort Ticonderoga at the nexus of the two lakes. When General
St. Clair Saint Clair (also spelled St. Clair, St Clair or even Sinclair, and sometimes also pronounced that way) may refer to: Saints * Clair of Nantes (3rd century), first bishop of Nantes, the Saint named Clair * Clare of Assisi (1194–1253), source nam ...

St. Clair
abandoned
Fort Ticonderoga Fort Ticonderoga (), formerly Fort Carillon Fort Carillon, the precursor of Fort Ticonderoga Fort Ticonderoga (), formerly Fort Carillon, is a large 18th-century star fort built by the French at a narrows near the south end of Lake Cha ...

Fort Ticonderoga
in July, the Congress replaced Schuyler with General
Horatio Gates Horatio Lloyd Gates (July 26, 1727April 10, 1806) was a British-born American army officer who served as a general in the Continental Army The Continental Army was the army of the Thirteen Colonies and the Revolutionary-era United States ...

Horatio Gates
, who had accused Schuyler of dereliction of duty. In 1778, Schuyler and faced a court of inquiry over the loss of Ticonderoga, and both were acquitted. The British offensive was eventually stopped by Continental Army then under the command of Gates and
Benedict Arnold Benedict Arnold (Brandt (1994), p. 414 June 1801) was an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United States of America ...

Benedict Arnold
in the
Battle of Saratoga The Battles of Saratoga (September 19 and October 7, 1777) marked the climax of the Saratoga campaign The Saratoga campaign in 1777 was an attempt by the British high command for North America to gain military control of the strategically imp ...
. That victory, the first wholesale defeat of a large British force, marked a turning point in the revolution, for it convinced France to enter the war on the American side. When Schuyler demanded a court martial to answer Gates' charges, he was vindicated but resigned from the Army on April 19, 1779. He then served in two more sessions of the Continental Congress in 1779 and 1780.


Later career

As a prominent politician and Patriot leader in New York, Schuyler was the subject of an unsuccessful kidnapping attempt, which was plotted and led by John Walden Meyers on August 7, 1781. Schuyler was able to vacate his Albany mansion before the kidnappers arrived. Schuyler was an original member of the New York
Society of the Cincinnati The Society of the Cincinnati is a fraternal, hereditary society with thirteen constituent societies in the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a ...

Society of the Cincinnati
. After the war, he expanded his Saratoga estate to tens of thousands of acres, adding slaves, tenant farmers, a store, mills for flour, flax, and lumber. He built several schooners on the
Hudson River The Hudson River is a river that flows from north to south primarily through eastern New York (state), New York in the United States. It originates in the Adirondack Mountains of Upstate New York and flows southward through the Hudson Valley ...

Hudson River
, and named the first ''Saratoga''. According to the Schuyler Mansion Historic Society, there were around 40 slaves between the Albany and Saratoga estates. He was a member of the
New York State Senate The New York State Senate is the upper house of the New York State Legislature The New York State Legislature consists of the two houses that act as the state legislature A state legislature is a Legislature, legislative branch or body of ...

New York State Senate
from 1780 to 1784, and at the same time New York State Surveyor General from 1781 to 1784. Afterwards he returned to the State Senate from 1786 to 1790, where he actively supported the adoption of the
United States Constitution The Constitution of the United States is the supreme law A constitution is an aggregate of fundamental principles or established precedents that constitute the legal basis of a polity, organisation An organization, or orga ...

United States Constitution
. In
1789 Events January–March * January January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendar The Gregorian calendar is the used in most of the world. It was introduced in October 1582 by as a modific ...
, he was elected a U.S. Senator from New York to the
First United States Congress The 1st United States Congress, comprising the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives, met from March 4, 1789, to March 4, 1791, during the first two years of George Washington's Presidency of George Washington, pre ...
, serving from July 27, 1789, to March 3, 1791. After losing his bid for re-election in 1791 to Aaron Burr, he returned to the State Senate from 1792 to 1797. In
1797 Events January–March * January 3 Events Pre-1600 * 69 – The Roman legions on the Rhine refuse to declare their allegiance to Galba Galba (; born Servius Sulpicius Galba; 24 December 3 BC – 15 January AD 69) was a Roma ...
, he was selected again to the U.S. Senate and served in the
5th United States Congress The 5th United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, consisting of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. It met at Congress Hall in Philadelphia, Penns ...
from March 4, 1797, until his resignation because of ill health on January 3, 1798.


Personal life

According to the Schuyler Family's Bible, on September 7, 1755, he married Catherine Van Rensselaer (1734–1803) at Albany. In the Bible entry, he was called “Philip Johannes Schuyler” and she was called “Catherina Van Rensselaer”. She was the daughter of
Johannes Van Rensselaer Johannes is a Medieval Latin form of the personal name that usually appears as "John (name), John" in English language contexts. It is a variant of the Greek and Classical Latin variants (Ιωάννης, ''Ioannes''), itself derived from the Hebre ...
(1707/08–1783) and his first wife, Engeltje Livingston (1698–1746/47). Johannes was the grandson of
Hendrick van Rensselaer Hendrick van Rensselaer (October 23, 1667 – July 4, 1740) was director of the Eastern patent of the Rensselaerswyck manor. The estate was composed of land in Columbia County, New York, and land opposite Albany, New York, on the Hudson River, n ...
(1667–1740). Engeltje was the daughter of
Robert Livingston the Younger Robert Livingston the Younger (1663 – April 1725), sometimes known as Robert Livingston, Jr., or The Nephew was a wealthy merchant and political figure in colonial Albany, New York Albany ( ) is the State capital (United States), capital o ...
. Philip and Catherine had 15 children together, eight of whom survived to adulthood, including: *
Angelica Schuyler Angelica Church (née Schuyler ; February 20, 1756 – March 6, 1814) was an American socialite. She was the eldest daughter of Continental Army The Continental Army was formed by the Second Continental Congress after the outbreak of the A ...
(1756–1814), who married
John Barker Church John Barker Church, John Carter, (October 30, 1748 – April 27, 1818) was an English born businessman and supplier of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. He returned to England after the Revolutionary War and served in the House ...
(1748–1818), later a British MP. * (1757–1854), who married
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was an American statesman, politician, legal scholar, military commander, lawyer, banker, and economist. He was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States The Founding Fa ...

Alexander Hamilton
(1755/7–1804), later the first
United States Secretary of the Treasury The United States secretary of the treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury The Department of the Treasury (USDT) is the national treasury A treasury is either *A government department related to finance and ta ...
. Elizabeth co-founded the first private orphanage in New York City. *
Margarita "Peggy" Schuyler Margarita "Peggy" Schuyler Van Rensselaer (September 19, 1758 – March 14, 1801) was the third daughter of Continental Army General Philip Schuyler. She was the wife of Stephen Van Rensselaer, Stephen Van Rensselaer III, sister of Angelica Schu ...
(1758–1801), who married
Stephen Van Rensselaer III Stephen Van Rensselaer III (; November 1, 1764January 26, 1839) was a New York landowner, businessman, militia officer, and politician. A graduate of Harvard College Harvard College is the undergraduate education, undergraduate college of Harv ...

Stephen Van Rensselaer III
(1764–1839), 8th
Patroon In the United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 U.S. state, st ...
. * Cornelia Schuyler (1761–1762), a twin to the first John Bradstreet. * John Bradstreet Schuyler (1761–1761), a twin to Cornelia. * John Bradstreet Schuyler (1763–1764). * John Bradstreet Schuyler (1765–1795), who married Elizabeth Van Rensselaer (1768–1841), the sister of
Stephen Van Rensselaer III Stephen Van Rensselaer III (; November 1, 1764January 26, 1839) was a New York landowner, businessman, militia officer, and politician. A graduate of Harvard College Harvard College is the undergraduate education, undergraduate college of Harv ...

Stephen Van Rensselaer III
who married his sister Peggy. *
Philip Jeremiah Schuyler Philip Jeremiah Schuyler (January 21, 1768 – February 21, 1835) was an American politician from New York (state), New York. His siblings included Angelica Schuyler, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, and Peggy Schuyler, Margarita Schuyler Van Renssel ...

Philip Jeremiah Schuyler
(1768–1835), who served in the
U.S. House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives is the lower house A lower house is one of two chambers Chambers may refer to: Places Canada: *Chambers Township, Ontario United States: *Chambers County, Alabama *Chambers, Arizona, an unin ...
and who married Sarah Rutsen; after her death in 1805, he married Mary Anna Sawyer. * Triplets (1770–1770, Unbaptized). * Rensselaer Schuyler (1773–1847), who married Elizabeth Ten Broeck, daughter of General
Abraham Ten Broeck Abraham Ten Broeck (May 13, 1734 – January 19, 1810) was a New York New York most commonly refers to: * New York City, the most populous city in the United States, located in the state of New York * New York (state), a state in the northe ...
. * Cornelia Schuyler (1776–1808), who married Washington Morton. * Cortlandt Schuyler (1778–1778). * Catherine Van Rensselaer Schuyler (1781–1857), who married first, Samuel Malcolm (son of
William Malcolm General William Malcolm (January 23, 1745 – September 1, 1791) was a New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media L ...

William Malcolm
), and then James Cochran (1769–1848), her cousin and the son of John Cochran and Gertrude Schuyler, Philip Schuyler's sister. Schuyler's country home had been destroyed by General
John Burgoyne General A general officer is an officer of high rank in the armies, and in some nations' air forces, space forces, or marines Marines or naval infantry, are typically a military force trained to operate on Littoral Zone, littoral ...

John Burgoyne
's forces in October 1777. Later that year, he began rebuilding on the same site, now located in southern Schuylerville, New York. This later home is maintained by the
National Park Service The National Park Service (NPS) is an agency Agency may refer to: * a governmental or other institution Institutions, according to Samuel P. Huntington, are "stable, valued, recurring patterns of behavior". Institutions can refer to mecha ...
as part of the
Saratoga National Historical Park Saratoga National Historical Park is a United States National Historical Park located in the Town of Stillwater in eastern New York (state), New York, north of Albany, New York, Albany. The park preserves the site of the Battles of Saratoga. D ...

Saratoga National Historical Park
, and is open to the public. Schuyler died at the
Schuyler Mansion Schuyler Mansion is a historic house at 32 Catherine Street in Albany, New York, United States. The brick mansion is now a museum and an official National Historic Landmark A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a National Register of Historic ...

Schuyler Mansion
in Albany on November 18, 1804, four months after his son-in-law,
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was an American statesman, politician, legal scholar, military commander, lawyer, banker, and economist. He was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States The Founding Fa ...

Alexander Hamilton
, was killed in a duel and 2 days before his 71st birthday. He is buried at
Albany Rural Cemetery The Albany Rural Cemetery was established October 7, 1844, in Colonie, New York, United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country Contiguous United States, primari ...
in
Menands, New York Menands is a village A village is a clustered human settlement or community, larger than a hamlet (place), hamlet but smaller than a town (although the word is often used to describe both hamlets and smaller towns), with a population t ...

Menands, New York
. File:Schuyler Mansion Panorama Left.jpg,
Schuyler Mansion Schuyler Mansion is a historic house at 32 Catherine Street in Albany, New York, United States. The brick mansion is now a museum and an official National Historic Landmark A National Historic Landmark (NHL) is a National Register of Historic ...

Schuyler Mansion
, which was constructed from 1761 to 1765 File:GeneralSchylerHouse.JPG, Schuyler's Country House used during the
Revolution In political science Political science is the scientific study of politics Politics (from , ) is the set of activities that are associated with making decisions in groups, or other forms of power relations between individuals, suc ...
, in
Schuylerville Schuylerville () is a Administrative divisions of New York#Village, village in Saratoga County, New York, Saratoga County, New York (state), New York, United States. The village is located in the northeastern part of the Saratoga, New York, Town ...


Legacy


Place names

Geographic locations and buildings named in Schuyler's honor include: *
Schuyler, New York: ''There is also a Schuyler County, New York''. Schuyler is a Administrative divisions of New York#Town, town in Herkimer County, New York, Herkimer County, New York (state), New York, United States. The population was 3,420 at the 2010 census. Th ...
*
Schuylerville, New York Schuylerville () is a Administrative divisions of New York#Village, village in Saratoga County, New York, Saratoga County, New York (state), New York, United States. The village is located in the northeastern part of the Saratoga, New York, Town ...
*
Schuyler County, New York Schuyler County is a County (United States), county in the U.S. state of New York (state), New York. As of the 2020 United States census, 2020 census, the population was 17,898, making it the second-least populous county in New York. The county ...
, as well as
Schuyler County, Illinois Schuyler County is a County (United States), county in the U.S. state of Illinois. According to the 2010 United States Census, 2010 census, it had a population of 7,544. Its county seat is Rushville, Illinois, Rushville. History Schuyler County ...
, and
Schuyler County, Missouri Schuyler County is a County (United States), county located in the northeastern portion of the U.S. state of Missouri. As of the 2010 United States Census, 2010 census, the population was 4,431, making it the fourth-least populous county in Misso ...
*
Fort Schuyler Fort Schuyler is a preserved 19th century fortification in the New York City borough (New York City), borough of the Bronx. It houses a museum, the Stephen B. Luce Library, and the Marine Transportation Department and Administrative offices of ...
, a military
fortification A fortification is a military construction or building designed for the defense of territories in warfare, and is also used to establish rule in a region during peacetime. The term is derived from Latin ''fortis'' ("strong") and ''facere'' ( ...

fortification
begun in 1833 at the tip of
Throggs Neck Throggs Neck (also known as Throgs Neck) is a neighborhood and peninsula in the south-eastern portion of the borough A borough is an administrative division Administrative division, administrative unitArticle 3(1). , country subdivision, ...

Throggs Neck
in
the Bronx The Bronx () is a borough of New York City New York City is composed of five boroughs: The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island. Each borough is coextensive with a respective Administrative divisions of New York (state)#Count ...
, which now houses the Maritime Industry Museum and the
State University of New York Maritime College State University of New York Maritime College (SUNY Maritime College) is a Public college, public List of maritime colleges, maritime college in New York City. It is part of the State University of New York (SUNY) system. Founded in 1874, the SU ...
* The Philip Schuyler Achievement Academy (named for Schuyler and his son Philip) in Albany, New York (name change expected in 2021)


Works of art

Schuyler was depicted by
John Trumbull John Trumbull (; June 6, 1756November 10, 1843) was an American artist of the early independence period, notable for his historical paintings of the American Revolutionary War, of which he was a veteran. He has been called "The Painter of the R ...

John Trumbull
in his 1821 painting ''
Surrender of General Burgoyne The ''Surrender of General Burgoyne'' is an oil painting by John Trumbull. The painting was completed in 1821, and hangs in the United States Capitol rotunda, rotunda of the United States Capitol in Washington, D. C. The painting depicts the su ...

Surrender of General Burgoyne
'', which hangs in the
United States Capitol rotunda The United States Capitol rotunda is the tall central rotunda of the United States Capitol The United States Capitol, often called The Capitol or the Capitol Building, is the meeting place of the and the of the of the . It is located ...

United States Capitol rotunda
in Washington, D.C. ''Major General Philip Schuyler'', a bronze statue by sculptor J. Massey Rhind, was erected outside
Albany City Hall Albany City Hall is the seat of government The seat of government is (as defined by ''Brewer's Politics'') "the building, complex of buildings or the city from which a government A government is the system or group of people gove ...

Albany City Hall
in 1925. In June 2020, Albany mayor
Kathy Sheehan Katherine M. Sheehan (born December 5, 1963) is an American politician and attorney serving as the 75th Mayor of Albany. Prior to being elected Mayor, Sheehan served as City Treasurer from 2010 to 2013. On September 10, 2013, she defeated Corey El ...
signed an executive order for the statue to be removed and given to a "museum or other institution for future display with appropriate historical context", due to Schuyler's ownership of slaves. The statue was requested the next day by the mayor of
Schuylerville, New York Schuylerville () is a Administrative divisions of New York#Village, village in Saratoga County, New York, Saratoga County, New York (state), New York, United States. The village is located in the northeastern part of the Saratoga, New York, Town ...
, who suggested that it be relocated to Schuyler House.


In popular culture

The non-speaking role of Philip Schuyler was originated by ensemble member Sydney James Harcourt in the 2015
Broadway Broadway may refer to: Theatre * Broadway Theatre (disambiguation) * Broadway theatre, theatrical productions in professional theatres near Broadway, Manhattan, New York City, U.S. ** Broadway (Manhattan), the street **Broadway Theatre (53rd St ...
musical ''
Hamilton Hamilton may refer to: People * Hamilton (name), a common British surname and occasional given name, usually of Scottish origin, including a list of persons with the surname ** The Duke of Hamilton, the premier peer of Scotland ** Lord Hamilton ...
'', in which Schuyler's son-in-law
Alexander Hamilton Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757July 12, 1804) was an American statesman, politician, legal scholar, military commander, lawyer, banker, and economist. He was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States The Founding Fa ...

Alexander Hamilton
is the
title character The title character in a Narrative, narrative work is one who is named or referred to in the title of the work. In a performed work such as a play or film, the performer who plays the title character is said to have the title role of the piece. The ...
.


References

; Specific


Additional reading

* * ''Revolutionary Enigma: A Re-Appraisal of General Philip Schuyler of New York'' by Martin H. Bush; 1969; (). * * ''Proud Patriot: Philip Schuyler and the War of Independence, 1775–1783'' by Don Gerlach; 1987; Syracuse University Press; ().
''The New York Civil List'' compiled by Franklin Benjamin Hough (pages 37f; Weed, Parsons and Co., 1858)
* ''The Real George Washington'' by the National Center for Constitutional Studies; 1991; 2009 reprint


External links


Co-Planner of the Sullivan-Clinton Campaign Against the Iroquois

Collection of Letters from Philip Schuyler

Philip Schuyler Achievement Academy


at the
New York State Library New is an adjective referring to something recently made, discovered, or created. New or NEW may refer to: Music * New, singer of K-pop group The Boyz Boyz or The Boyz may refer to: Music Bands *The Boyz (German band), a German boy band of t ...
{{DEFAULTSORT:Schuyler, Philip John 1733 births 1804 deaths Politicians from Albany, New York People of colonial New York Schuyler family American people of Dutch descent Reformed Church in America members Continental Congressmen from New York (state) Pro-Administration Party United States senators from New York (state) Federalist Party United States senators from New York (state) New York (state) Federalists Members of the New York General Assembly Members of the New York Provincial Assembly Members of the New York State Assembly New York (state) state senators New York State Engineers and Surveyors American slave owners Politicians from New Rochelle, New York Military personnel from Albany, New York Military personnel from New Rochelle, New York People of New York in the French and Indian War Continental Army officers from New York (state) Continental Army personnel who were court-martialed Continental Army generals Burials at Albany Rural Cemetery 18th-century American politicians