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The Associated Press (AP) is an American
non-profit A nonprofit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity, not-for-profit organization, or nonprofit institution, is a legal entity organized and operated for a collective, public or social benefit, in contrast with an entity that o ...
news agency A news agency is an organization that gathers reports and sells them to subscribing news organizations, such as s, s and and . A news agency may also be referred to as a wire service, newswire, or news service. Although there are many news ...
headquartered in
New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of ...

New York City
. Founded in 1846, it operates as a
cooperative A cooperative (also known as co-operative, co-op, or coop) is "an association of persons united voluntarily to meet their common economic, social, and cultural needs and aspirations through a jointly-owned ".unincorporated association Under English law English law is the common law In law, common law (also known as judicial precedent or judge-made law, or case law) is the body of law created by judges and similar quasi-judicial tribunals by virtue of being stated in written ...
. Its members are U.S. newspapers and broadcasters. AP news reports that it distributes to its members and customers are produced in English, Spanish, and Arabic. The AP has earned 54
Pulitzer Prizes#REDIRECT Pulitzer Prize The Pulitzer Prize () is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature and musical composition within the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of Joseph ...
, including 32 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. The AP has been tracking vote counts in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures. The AP collects and verifies returns in every county, parish, city and town across the U.S., and declares winners in over 5,000 contests. By 2016, news collected by the AP was published and republished by more than 1,300 newspapers and broadcasters. The AP operates 248
news bureau A news bureau is an office for gathering or distributing news News is information about current events. This may be provided through many different Media (communication), media: word of mouth, printing, postal systems, broadcasting, electron ...
s in 99 countries. It also operates the AP Radio Network, which provides newscasts twice hourly for broadcast and satellite radio and television stations. Many newspapers and broadcasters outside the United States are AP subscribers, paying a fee to use AP material without being contributing members of the cooperative. As part of their cooperative agreement with the AP, most member news organizations grant automatic permission for the AP to distribute their
local news In journalism Journalism is the production and distribution of reports on the interaction of events, facts, ideas, and people that are the "news of the day" and that informs society to at least some degree. The word applies to the journalist, ...
reports. The AP traditionally employed the " inverted pyramid" formula for writing, a method that enables news outlets to edit a story to fit its available publication area without losing the story's essentials, although in 2007, then-AP President
Tom Curley Thomas Curley (born July 6, 1948) is an American businessman and journalist who served as President of the Associated Press The Associated Press (AP) is an American Nonprofit organization, non-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Fou ...
called the practice "dead".


History

The Associated Press was formed in May 1846 by five daily newspapers in
New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from New York State New York is a state State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literature * ''State Magazine'', a monthly magazine published by the U.S. Department of ...

New York City
to share the cost of transmitting news of the
Mexican–American War The Mexican–American War, also known in the United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country Contiguous United States, primarily located in North America. ...

Mexican–American War
. The venture was organized by
Moses Yale Beach Moses Yale Beach (January 7, 1800 – July 18, 1868) was an American inventor and publisher who started the Associated Press The Associated Press (AP) is an American Nonprofit organization, non-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. ...

Moses Yale Beach
(1800–68), second publisher of '' The Sun'', joined by the ''
New York Herald The ''New York Herald'' was a large-distribution newspaper based in New York City New York, often called New York City to distinguish it from , or NYC for short, is the in the United States. With a 2020 population of 8,804,190 distr ...
'', the ''
New York Courier and Enquirer The ''New York Courier and Enquirer'', properly called the ''Morning Courier and New-York Enquirer'', was a daily broadsheet newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or simply a peri ...
'', ''
The Journal of Commerce ''The Journal of Commerce'' is a biweekly magazine published in the United States that focuses on global trade topics. First published in 1827 in New York, it has a circulation of approximately 15,000. It provides editorial content to manage day- ...
'', and the ''
New York Evening Express ''The New York Evening Express'' (1836–1881) was a 19th-century American newspaper published in New York City New York City (NYC), often simply called New York, is the List of United States cities by population, most populous city in the U ...
''. Some historians believe that the ''
New-York Tribune The ''New-York Tribune'' was an American newspaper, first established in 1841 by editor Horace Greeley. Between 1842 and 1866, the newspaper bore the name ''New-York Daily Tribune.'' From the 1840s through the 1860s it was the dominant Whig Party ...
'' joined at this time; documents show it was a member in 1849. ''
The New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of a ...

The New York Times
'' became a member shortly after its founding in September 1851. Initially known as the New York Associated Press (NYAP), the organization faced competition from the Western Associated Press (1862), which criticized its monopolistic news gathering and price setting practices. An investigation completed in 1892 by , editor and publisher of the ''
Chicago Daily News The ''Chicago Daily News'' was an afternoon daily newspaper in the midwestern United States The midwestern United States, often referred to simply as the Midwest, is one of four Census Bureau Region, census regions of the United States Censu ...
'', revealed that several principals of the NYAP had entered into a secret agreement with United Press, a rival organization, to share NYAP news and the profits of reselling it. The revelations led to the demise of the NYAP and in December 1892, the Western Associated Press was incorporated in Illinois as The Associated Press. A 1900
Illinois Supreme Court The Supreme Court of Illinois is the state supreme court In the United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country Contiguous United States, primarily located ...

Illinois Supreme Court
decision (''Inter Ocean Publishing Co. v. Associated Press'')—that the AP was a
public utility A public utility company (usually just utility) is an organization that maintains the infrastructure Infrastructure is the set of fundamental facilities and systems that support the sustainable functionality of households and firms. Serving a ...
and operating in restraint of trade—resulted in AP's move from Chicago to New York City, where corporation laws were more favorable to cooperatives. When the AP was founded, news became a saleable commodity. The invention of the
rotary press A rotary printing press is a printing press in which the images to be printed are curved around a cylinder. Printing can be done on various substrates, including paper, cardboard, and plastic. Substrates can be sheet feed or unwound on a continuo ...
allowed the ''
New-York Tribune The ''New-York Tribune'' was an American newspaper, first established in 1841 by editor Horace Greeley. Between 1842 and 1866, the newspaper bore the name ''New-York Daily Tribune.'' From the 1840s through the 1860s it was the dominant Whig Party ...
'' in the 1870s to print 18,000 papers per hour. During the
Civil War A civil war, also known as an intrastate war in polemology, is a war between organized groups within the same Sovereign state, state (or country). The aim of one side may be to take control of the country or a region, to achieve independen ...
and
Spanish–American War The Spanish–American War (April 21 – August 13, 1898, es, Guerra hispano-estadounidense or ; fil, Digmaang Espanyol-Amerikano) was an armed conflict War is an intense armed conflict between State (polity), states, governments, S ...
, there was a new incentive to print vivid, on-the-spot reporting. Melville Stone, who had founded the ''
Chicago Daily News The ''Chicago Daily News'' was an afternoon daily newspaper in the midwestern United States The midwestern United States, often referred to simply as the Midwest, is one of four Census Bureau Region, census regions of the United States Censu ...
'' in 1875, served as AP General Manager from 1893 to 1921. He embraced the standards of accuracy, impartiality, and integrity. The cooperative grew rapidly under the leadership of Kent Cooper (served 1925–48), who built up bureau staff in South America, Europe and (after
World War II World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a World war, global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. It involved World War II by country, the vast majority of the world's countries—including all of the g ...
), the Middle East. He introduced the "telegraph typewriter" or teletypewriter into newsrooms in 1914. In 1935, AP launched the Wirephoto network, which allowed transmission of news photographs over leased private telephone lines on the day they were taken. This gave AP a major advantage over other news media outlets. While the first network was only between New York, Chicago, and San Francisco, eventually AP had its network across the whole United States. In 1945, the
Supreme Court of the United States The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States of America The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or Americ ...

Supreme Court of the United States
held in ''
Associated Press v. United States ''Associated Press v. United States'', 326 U.S. 1 (1945), was a United States Supreme Court The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest court in the federal judiciary of the United States of America The United Sta ...
'' that the AP had been violating the
Sherman Antitrust Act The Sherman Antitrust Act of 1890 (, ) is a United States antitrust law In the United States, antitrust law is a collection of federal and state government laws that regulate the conduct and organization of business corporations and are genera ...
by prohibiting member newspapers from selling or providing news to nonmember organizations as well as making it very difficult for nonmember newspapers to join the AP. The decision facilitated the growth of its main rival
United Press International United Press International (UPI) is an international news agency whose newswires, photo, news film, and audio services provided news material to thousands of newspapers, magazines, radio and television stations for most of the 20th century. A ...
, headed by
Hugh Baillie Hugh Baillie (October 23, 1890 – March 1, 1966) was an American journalist best known as the head of UP (United Press Associations United Press International (UPI) is an international news agency whose newswires, photo, news film, and a ...
from 1935 to 1955. AP entered the broadcast field in 1941 when it began distributing news to radio stations; it created its own radio network in 1974. In 1994, it established APTV, a global video newsgathering agency. APTV merged with WorldWide Television News in 1998 to form APTN, which provides video to international broadcasters and websites. In 2004, AP moved its world headquarters from its longtime home at 50 Rockefeller Plaza to a huge building at
450 West 33rd Street 5 Manhattan West is a building at 450 West 33rd Street in Hudson Yards, Manhattan Manhattan (), known regionally as the City and the urban core of the New York metropolitan area, is the most densely populated of the five boroughs of New ...
in Manhattan—which also houses the ''
New York Daily News The New York ''Daily News'', officially titled the ''Daily News'', is an American newspaper based in New York City New York City (NYC), often simply called New York, is the List of United States cities by population, most populous city in ...

New York Daily News
'' and the studios of New York's public television station,
WNET WNET, virtual channel In most telecommunications Telecommunication is the transmission of information by various types of technologies over wire, radio, Optical system, optical, or other Electromagnetism, electromagnetic systems. It has ...
. In 2019, AP had more than 240 bureaus globally. Its mission—"to gather with economy and efficiency an accurate and impartial report of the news"—has not changed since its founding, but digital technology has made the distribution of the AP news report an interactive endeavor between AP and its 1,400 U.S. newspaper members as well as broadcasters, international subscribers, and online customers. The AP began diversifying its news gathering capabilities and by 2007 AP was generating only about 30% of its revenue from United States newspapers. 37% came from the global broadcast customers, 15% from online ventures and 18% came from international newspapers and from photography.


Web resources

The AP's multi-topic structure has resulted in web portals such as
Yahoo! Yahoo (, styled as yahoo''!'') is an American web services The term Web service (WS) is either: * a service offered by an electronic device to another electronic device, communicating with each other via the World Wide Web, or * a server run ...
and
MSN MSN (meaning Microsoft Network) is a web portal A web portal is a specially designed website that brings information from diverse sources, like emails, Internet forum, online forums and Web search engine, search engines, together in a uniform wa ...

MSN
posting its articles, often relying on the AP as their first source for news coverage of breaking news items. This and the constant updating evolving stories require has had a major impact on the AP's public image and role, giving new credence to the AP's ongoing mission of having staff for covering every area of news fully and promptly. The AP was also the news service used on the
Wii The Wii ( ) is a developed and marketed by . It was first released on November 19, 2006, in North America and in December 2006 for most other of the world. It is Nintendo's fifth major home game console, following the and is a alongsid ...

Wii
's
News Channel News broadcasting is the medium of broadcasting Broadcasting is the distributionDistribution may refer to: Mathematics *Distribution (mathematics) Distributions, also known as Schwartz distributions or generalized functions, are ...
. In 2007, Google announced that it was paying to receive Associated Press content, to be displayed in
Google News Google News is a news aggregator In computing Computing is any goal-oriented activity requiring, benefiting from, or creating computing machinery. It includes the study and experimentation of algorithm of an algorithm (Euclid's algorith ...

Google News
, though this was interrupted from late 2009 to mid-2010, due to a licensing dispute. A 2017 study by
NewsWhip NewsWhip is a social media Social media are interactive technologies that facilitate the creation Creation may refer to: Religion * Creation ''ex nihilo'', the concept that matter was created by God out of nothing * Creation myth A creation ...
revealed that AP content was more engaged with on
Facebook Facebook is an American online social media and social networking service owned by Meta Platforms. Founded in 2004 by Mark Zuckerberg with fellow Harvard College students and roommates Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, an ...

Facebook
than content from any individual English-language publisher.


Timeline

* 1849: the Harbor News Association opened the first
news bureau A news bureau is an office for gathering or distributing news News is information about current events. This may be provided through many different Media (communication), media: word of mouth, printing, postal systems, broadcasting, electron ...
outside the United States in
Halifax Halifax commonly refers to: *Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada *Halifax, West Yorkshire, England *Halifax (bank), a British bank Halifax may also refer to: Places Australia *Halifax, Queensland *Halifax Bay, North Queensland Canada Nova Scotia *Hali ...
,
Nova Scotia ) , image_map = Nova Scotia in Canada 2.svg , Label_map = yes , coordinates = , official_lang = English (''de facto'') , RegionalLang = French, Scots Gaelic , capital ...

Nova Scotia
, to meet ships sailing from Europe before they reached dock in New York. * 1876: Mark Kellogg, a
stringer Stringer may refer to: Structural elements * Stringer (aircraft), or longeron, a strip of wood or metal to which the skin of an aircraft is fastened * Stringer (slag), an inclusion, possibly leading to a defect, in cast metal * Stringer (stairs), t ...
, was the first AP news correspondent to be killed while reporting the news, at the
Battle of the Little Bighorn The Battle of the Little Bighorn, known to the Lakota and other Plains Indians as the Battle of the Greasy Grass and also commonly referred to as Custer's Last Stand, was an armed engagement between combined forces of the Lakota, Northern C ...
. * 1893: Melville E. Stone became the general manager of the reorganized AP, a post he held until 1921. Under his leadership, the AP grew to be one of the world's most prominent news agencies. * 1899: AP used
Guglielmo Marconi Guglielmo Giovanni Maria Marconi, 1st Marquis of Marconi (; 25 April 187420 July 1937) was an inventor and , known for his creation of a practical -based system. This led to Marconi being credited as the , and he shared the 1909 with "in ...

Guglielmo Marconi
's wireless
telegraph Telegraphy is the long-distance transmission of messages where the sender uses symbolic codes, known to the recipient, rather than a physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus flag semaphore Flag semaphore (from the Ancient ...
to cover the
America's Cup The America's Cup, informally known as the Auld Mug, is a trophy A trophy is a tangible, durable reminder of a specific achievement, and serves as a recognition or evidence of merit. Trophies are often awarded for , from youth sports to pr ...

America's Cup
yacht race off
Sandy Hook Image:Wpdms usgs photo sandy hook.jpg, 262px, Sandy Hook, part of the Gateway National Recreation Area Sandy Hook is a Spit (landform), barrier spit in Middletown Township, New Jersey, Middletown Township, Monmouth County, New Jersey, United S ...
,
New Jersey New Jersey is a U.S. state, state in the Mid-Atlantic States, Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States, Northeastern regions of the United States. It is bordered on the north and east by the state of New York (state), New York; on the ea ...
, the first news test of the new technology. * 1914: AP introduced the
teleprinter A teleprinter (teletypewriter, teletype or TTY) is an electromechanical device that can be used to send and receive typed messages through various communications channels, in both point-to-point (telecommunications), point-to-point and point- ...
, which transmitted directly to printers over telegraph wires. Eventually a worldwide network of 60-word-per-minute teleprinter machines is built. * 1935: AP initiated
WirePhoto Wirephoto, telephotography or radiophoto is the sending of pictures File:TEIDE.JPG, An Synthetic aperture radar, SAR radar imaging, radar image acquired by the SIR-C/X-SAR radar on board the Space Shuttle Endeavour shows the Teide volcano. The ...
, the world's first wire service for photographs. The first photograph to transfer over the network depicted an airplane crash in Morehouse,
New York New York most commonly refers to: * New York City, the most populous city in the United States, located in the state of New York * New York (state), a state in the northeastern United States New York may also refer to: Film and television * New ...
, on
New Year's Day New Year's Day is a festival observed in most of the world on 1 January, the first day of the year in the modern Gregorian calendar The Gregorian calendar is the used in most of the world. It was introduced in October 1582 by as a modi ...

New Year's Day
, 1935. * 1938: AP expanded new offices at 50 Rockefeller Plaza (known as "50 Rock") under an agreement made as part of the
construction of Rockefeller Center The construction of the Rockefeller Center complex in New York City was conceived as an urban renewal project in the late 1920s, spearheaded by John D. Rockefeller Jr. to help revitalize Midtown Manhattan. Rockefeller Center is located on one o ...
in New York City. The building would remain its headquarters for 66 years. * 1941: AP expanded from print to radio broadcast news. * 1941: Wide World News Photo Service purchased from ''
The New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of a ...

The New York Times
''. *1943: AP sends Ruth Cowan Nash to cover the deployment of the Women's Army Auxiliary Corps to
Algeria ) , image_map = Algeria (centered orthographic projection).svg , map_caption = , image_map2 = , capital = Algiers , coordinates = , largest_city = capital , religion = , official_languages = , languages_type = Oth ...

Algeria
. Nash is the first American woman war correspondent.“Go to War I Did, and at Considerable Trouble”
Ramirez, Maria. Nieman Reports, Nieman Foundation at Harvard.
* 1945: AP
war correspondent A war correspondent is a journalist A journalist is an individual trained to collect/gather information in form of text, audio or pictures, processes them to a news-worthy form and disseminates it to the public. The act or process mainly done ...
Joseph Morton was executed along with nine
OSS Oss () is a and a in the southern , in the province of . Population centres Topography ''Dutch Topographic map of Oss (municipality), June 2015'' City center of Oss Oss has a shopping center with many squares, however, the only rea ...

OSS
men and four British SOE agents by the Germans at
Mauthausen concentration camp Mauthausen was a Nazi concentration camp on a hill above the market town of Mauthausen, Upper Austria, Mauthausen (roughly east of Linz), Upper Austria. It was the main camp of a group with List of subcamps of Mauthausen, nearly 100 further S ...
. Morton was the only
Allied An alliance is a relationship among people, groups, or sovereign state, states that have joined together for mutual benefit or to achieve some common purpose, whether or not explicit agreement has been worked out among them. Members of an alli ...
correspondent to be executed by the
Axis Axis may refer to: Politics *Axis of evil The phrase "axis of evil" was first used by U.S. President George W. Bush in his State of the Union address on January 29, 2002, less than five months after the 9/11 attacks, and often repeated t ...
during
World War II World War II or the Second World War, often abbreviated as WWII or WW2, was a global war A world war is "a war War is an intense armed conflict between states State may refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Literatur ...
. That same year, AP
Paris Paris () is the Capital city, capital and List of communes in France with over 20,000 inhabitants, most populous city of France, with an estimated population of 2,175,601 residents , in an area of more than . Since the 17th century, Paris ha ...

Paris
bureau chief
Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Kennedy (February 22, 1932 – August 25, 2009) was an American politician and lawyer who served as a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts Massachusetts (, ), officially the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, is the most populous U. ...
defied an Allied headquarters
news blackout Media blackout refers to the censorship of news related to a certain topic, particularly in mass media, for any reason. A media blackout may be voluntary, or may in some countries be enforced by the government or State (polity), state. The latter ca ...
to report
Nazi Germany Nazi Germany, (lit. "National Socialist State"), ' (lit. "Nazi State") for short; also ' (lit. "National Socialist Germany") officially known as the German Reich from 1933 until 1943, and the Greater German Reich from 1943 to 1945, was ...

Nazi Germany
's surrender, touching off a bitter episode that lead to his eventual dismissal by the AP. Kennedy maintains that he reported only what German radio already had broadcast. * 1951: AP war correspondent
Prague Prague ( ; cs, Praha ; german: Prag, ; la, Praga) is the capital and largest city A city is a large human settlement In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people ...

Prague
bureau chief William N. Oatis was arrested for
espionage Espionage or spying is the act of obtaining secret Secrecy is the practice of hiding information Information can be thought of as the resolution of uncertainty; it answers the question of "What an entity is" and thus defines both it ...

espionage
by the Communist government of
Czechoslovakia , , yi, טשעכאסלאוואקיי, , common_name = Czechoslovakia , life_span = 1918–19391945–1992 , p1 = Austria-Hungary , image_p1 = , s1 = Czech Re ...

Czechoslovakia
. He was not released until 1953. * 1974: AP launches Associated Press Radio Network headquartered in Washington, D.C. * 1994: AP launches APTV, a global video news gathering agency, headquartered in London. * 2004: The AP moved its headquarters from 50 Rock to 450 West 33rd Street, New York City. * 2006: AP joined
YouTube YouTube is an American online video sharing and social media platform Social media are interactive technologies that allow the Content creation, creation or information sharing, sharing/exchange of information, ideas, career interests, an ...

YouTube
. * 2008: The AP launched AP Mobile (initially known as the AP Mobile News Network), a multimedia news portal that gives users news they can choose and provides anytime access to international, national and local news. AP was the first to debut a dedicated iPhone application in June 2008 on stage at Apple's WWDC event. The app offered AP's own worldwide coverage of
breaking news Breaking news, interchangeably termed late-breaking news and also known as a special report or special coverage or news flash, is a current issue that broadcasters feel warrants the interruption of scheduled programming or current news in order ...
, sports, entertainment, politics and business as well as content from more than 1,000 AP members and
third-party source In commerce Commerce is the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale. Etymology The English-language word ''commerce'' has been derived from the Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language belonging to the Italic lan ...
s.The Associated Press (2009-05-21)
"AP Mobile rings in one-year anniversary"
, ''AP'', Press Release.
* 2010: AP launched multi-device World Cup Soccer Applications providing real-time news coverage of the 2010 World Cup on desktop, Apple and Android devices. * 2010: AP earnings fall 65% from 2008 to just $8.8 million. The AP also announced that it would have posted a loss of $4.4 million had it not liquidated its German-language news service for $13.2 million. * 2011: AP revenue dropped $14.7 million in 2010. 2010 revenue totaled $631 million, a decline of 7% from the previous year. AP rolled out price cuts designed to help newspapers and broadcasters cope with declining revenue. * 2012: Gary B. Pruitt succeeded
Tom Curley Thomas Curley (born July 6, 1948) is an American businessman and journalist who served as President of the Associated Press The Associated Press (AP) is an American Nonprofit organization, non-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Fou ...
to become president and CEO. Pruitt is the 13th leader of AP in its 166-year history. * 2016: AP Reports that income dropped to $1.6 million from $183.6 million in 2015. The 2015 profit figure was bolstered by a one-time, $165 million tax benefit. * 2017: AP moved its headquarters to
200 Liberty Street 200 Liberty Street, formerly known as One World Financial Center, is a skyscraper in Lower Manhattan, New York City. It is located at 200 Liberty Street (Manhattan), Liberty Street between South End Avenue and West Side Highway, West Street. It ...
, New York City. * 2018: AP unveiled AP Votecast to replace
exit polls An election exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. A similar poll conducted before actual voters have voted is called an entrance poll. Pollsters – usually private companies working for ...
for the 2018 US midterm elections.


AP election polls

The AP is the only organization that collects and verifies election results in every city and county across the United States, including races for the U.S. president, the Senate and House of Representatives, governor as well as other statewide offices. Major news outlets rely on the polling data and results provided by the Associated Press before declaring a winner in major political races, particularly the presidential election. In declaring the winners, the AP has historically relied on a robust network of local reporters with first-hand knowledge of assigned territories who also have long-standing relationships with county clerks as well as other local officials. Moreover, the AP monitors and gathers data from county websites and electronic feeds provided by states. The research team further verifies the results by considering demographics, number of absentee ballots, and other political issues that may have an effect on the final results. In 2018, the AP has introduced a new system called AP VoteCast, which was developed together with NORC at the University of Chicago in order to further improve the reliability of its data and overcome biases of its legacy
exit poll An election exit poll is a poll of voters taken immediately after they have exited the polling stations. A similar poll conducted before actual voters have voted is called an entrance poll. Pollsters – usually private companies working for ...
. Recognized for its integrity and accuracy, the organization has collected and published presidential election data since 1848. During the 2016 election, the AP was 100% accurate in calling the president and congressional races in every state. After declaring
Joe Biden Joseph Robinette Biden Jr. ( ; born November 20, 1942) is an American politician who is the 46th and current president of the United States The president of the United States (POTUS) is the head of state and head of government of th ...

Joe Biden
the winner of the 2020 United States presidential election on November 7, 2020, the organization and its methodology came under close scrutiny, as incumbent president
Donald Trump Donald John Trump (born June 14, 1946) is an American politician A politician is a person active in party politics A political party is an organization that coordinates candidate A candidate, or nominee, is the prospective reci ...

Donald Trump
refused to concede and claimed the election was "rigged". In addition to the AP, the election was called for Biden by all major news outlets, including
CNN The Cable News Network (CNN) is a multinational news-based pay television Pay television, also known as subscription television, premium television or, when referring to an individual service, a premium channel, refers to subscription The ...

CNN
,
The New York Times ''The New York Times'' is an American daily newspaper based in New York City with a worldwide readership. Founded in 1851, the ''Times'' has since won List of Pulitzer Prizes awarded to The New York Times, 132 Pulitzer Prizes, the most of a ...

The New York Times
,
The Wall Street Journal ''The Wall Street Journal'', also known as ''The Journal'', is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper A newspaper is a periodical Periodical literature (also called a periodical publication or sim ...

The Wall Street Journal
,
ABC ABC are the first three letters of the Latin script known as the alphabet. ABC or abc may also refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Broadcasting * American Broadcasting Company, a commercial U.S. TV broadcaster ** Disney–ABC Television ...
,
NBC The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United States of America (USA), c ...
,
CBS CBS is an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S ...

CBS
, and
Fox News The Fox News Channel, abbreviated FNC, commonly known as Fox News, and stylized in all caps In typography, all caps (short for "all capitalization, capitals") refers to text or a typeface, font in which all letters are capital letters, for ...
, several of which relied on additional research and polling resources to corroborate Biden's victory. Lacking evidence of widespread voting fraud, Trump's accusations have been described as "baseless" while the government officials claimed that the 2020 election was "the most secure in American history." During the
2016 presidential election This national electoral calendar for 2016 lists the national/Federation, federal direct elections that were held in 2016 in all List of sovereign states, sovereign states and their Dependent territory, dependent territories. By-elections are ex ...
, when the AP declared Trump's victory against Hillary Clinton at 2:29AM on Wednesday, November 9, Trump did not contest the results and delivered his victory speech at 2:50AM the same night.


AP sports polls

The AP conducts polls for numerous
college sports College athletics encompasses non-professional A professional is a member of a profession or any person who earns their living from a specified professional activity. The term also describes the standards of education and training that prepare m ...
in the
United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 U.S. state, states, a Washington, D.C., ...

United States
. The AP college football rankings were created in 1936, and began including the top 25 teams in 1989. Since 1969, the final poll of each season has been released after all bowl games have been played. The AP released its all-time Top 25 in 2016. , 22 different programs had finished in the number one spot of the poll since its inception.. In the pre-bowl game determination era, the AP poll was often used as the distinction for a national champion in football. The AP college basketball poll has been used as a guide for which teams deserve national attention. The poll first began its poll of college basketball teams in 1949, and has since conducted over 1,100 polls. The college basketball poll started with 20 teams and was reduced to 10 during the 1960-61 college basketball season. It returned to 20 teams in 1968-69 and expanded to 25 beginning in 1989–90. The final poll for each season is released prior to the conclusion of the NCAA tournament, so all data includes regular season games only. In 2017, The AP released a list of the Top 100 teams of all time. The poll counted poll appearances (one point) and No. 1 rankings (two points) to rank each team.


AP sports awards


Baseball

The AP began its
Major League Baseball Major League Baseball (MLB) is a professional baseball Professional baseball is organized baseball in which players are selected for their talents and are paid to play for a specific team or club system. It is played in baseball league, leag ...
Manager of the Year Award in 1959, for a manager in each league.AP Manager of the Year Award
. Baseball-Almanac.com. Retrieved 2009-09-29. Although the award began in 1959, AP gave a "manager of the year" award in 1950 to Eddie Sawyer of the Philadelphia Phillies.
From 1984 to 2000, the award was given to one manager in all of MLB. The winners were chosen by a national panel of AP baseball writers and radio men. The award was discontinued in 2001.


Basketball

Every year, the AP releases the names of the winners of its AP College Basketball Player of the Year and Associated Press College Basketball Coach of the Year, AP College Basketball Coach of the Year awards. It also honors a group of NCAA Men's Basketball All-Americans, All-American players.


Football

* AP NFL Coach of the Year * AP NFL Most Valuable Player * AP NFL Offensive Player of the Year * AP NFL Defensive Player of the Year * AP NFL Rookie of the Year * AP NFL Comeback Player of the Year


Associated Press Television News

In 1994, London-based Associated Press Television (APTV) was founded to provide agency news material to television broadcasters. In 1998, AP purchased Worldwide Television News (WTN) from the ABC News division of The Walt Disney Company, Nine Network Australia and ITN London. AP publishes 70,000 videos and 6,000 hours of live video per year, . The agency also provides four simultaneous live video channels. AP was the first news agency to launch a live video news service in 2003.


Litigation and controversies


Kidnapping of Tina Susman

In 1994, Tina Susman was on her fourth trip to Somalia, reporting for the AP. She was reporting on U.S. peacekeeping troops leaving the country. Somali rebels outnumbered her bodyguards in Mogadishu, dragged her from her car in broad daylight, and held her for 20 days. She told ''Quill (magazine), The Quill'' that she believes being a woman was an advantage in her experience there. The AP had requested news organizations including ''The New York Times'', the ''Chicago Tribune,'' and ''The Washington Post'' to suppress the story to discourage the emboldening of the kidnappers. That year, she subsequently moved to Abidjan, Cote d'Ivoire to become AP's West Africa, West and Central Africa news editor and correspondent.


Christopher Newton

In September 2002, Washington, D.C. bureau reporter Christopher Newton, an AP reporter since 1994, was fired after he was accused of fabricating sources since 2000, including at least 40 people and organizations. Prior to his firing, Newton had been focused on writing about federal law-enforcement while based at the United States Department of Justice, Justice Department. Some of the nonexistent agencies quoted in his stories included "Education Alliance", the "Institute for Crime and Punishment in Chicago", "Voice for the Disabled", and "People for Civil Rights".


FBI impersonation case

In 2007, an FBI agent working in Seattle impersonated an AP journalist and infected the computer of a 15-year old suspect with a malicious surveillance software. The incident sparked a strongly-worded statement from the AP demanding the bureau never impersonate a member of the news media again. Moreover, in September 2016 the incident resulted in a condemnation by the Justice Department. In December 2017, following a US court appearance, a judge ruled in favor of the AP in a lawsuit against the FBI for fraudulently impersonating a member of the news media.


Copyright and intellectual property

In August 2005, Ken Knight, a Louisiana photographer, sued the AP claiming that it had willfully and negligently violated Knight's copyright by distributing a photograph of celebrity Britney Spears to various media outlets including, but not limited to: truTV (formerly CourtTV), America Online and Fox News Channel, Fox News. The case was settled in November 2006. In a case filed February 2005, ''McClatchey v. The Associated Press'', a Pennsylvania photographer sued the AP for Cropping (image), cropping a picture to remove the plaintiff's embedded title and copyright notice and later distributed it to news organizations without the plaintiff's permission or credit. The parties settled.


Fair-use controversy

In June 2008, the AP sent numerous Digital Millennium Copyright Act, DMCA take down demands and threatened legal action against several blogs. The AP contended that the internet blogs were violating AP's copyright by linking to AP material and using headlines and short summaries in those links. Many bloggers and experts noted that the use of the AP news fell squarely under commonly accepted internet practices and within fair use, fair-use standards. Others noted and demonstrated that AP routinely takes similar excerpts from other sources, often without attribution or licenses. AP responded that it was defining standards regarding citations of AP news.


Shepard Fairey

In March 2009, the Associated Press counter-sued artist Shepard Fairey over Obama HOPE poster, his famous image of Barack Obama, saying the uncredited, uncompensated use of an AP photo violated Copyright law of the United States, copyright laws and signaled a threat to journalism. Fairey had sued the AP the previous month over his artwork, titled "Obama Hope" and "Obama Progress", arguing that he did not violate copyright law because he dramatically changed the image. The artwork, based on an April 2006 picture taken for the AP by Mannie Garcia, was a popular image during the 2008 United States presidential election, 2008 presidential election and now hangs in the National Portrait Gallery (United States), National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C. According to the AP lawsuit filed in federal court in Manhattan, Fairey knowingly "misappropriated The AP's rights in that image". The suit asked the court to award AP profits made off the image and damages. Fairey said he looked forward to "upholding the Freedom of speech, free expression rights at stake here" and disproving the AP's accusations. In January 2011 this suit was settled with neither side declaring their position to be wrong but agreeing to share reproduction rights and profits from Fairey's work.


Hot News

In January 2008, Associated Press sued competitor All Headline News (AHN) claiming that AHN allegedly infringed on its copyrights and a contentious "quasi-property" right to facts. The AP complaint asserted that AHN reporters had copied facts from AP news reports without permission and without paying a syndication fee. After AHN moved to dismiss all but the copyright claims set forth by AP, a majority of the lawsuit was dismissed. The case has been dismissed and both parties settled. In June 2010, Associated Press was accused of having unfair and hypocritical policies after it was demonstrated that AP reporters had copied original reporting from the "Search Engine Land" website without permission, attribution, or credit.


"Illegal immigrant"

In April 2013, AP stated that it had dropped the term "Illegal immigration, illegal immigrant" from its AP Stylebook. AP followed
ABC ABC are the first three letters of the Latin script known as the alphabet. ABC or abc may also refer to: Arts, entertainment, and media Broadcasting * American Broadcasting Company, a commercial U.S. TV broadcaster ** Disney–ABC Television ...
,
NBC The National Broadcasting Company (NBC) is an American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, from, or related to the United States of America, commonly known as the United States The United States of America (USA), c ...
, and
CNN The Cable News Network (CNN) is a multinational news-based pay television Pay television, also known as subscription television, premium television or, when referring to an individual service, a premium channel, refers to subscription The ...

CNN
in not using the term. Jose Antonio Vargas commended The Associated Press for its decision. Syndicated writer Ruben Navarrette criticized the decision, stating the reasoning behind the decision was political correctness and called the blog "incomprehensible". Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano said of the decision, that she does not get involved in "vocabulary wars" and then stated "They are immigrants who are here illegally, that's an illegal immigrant."


Hoax tweet and flash crash

On April 23, 2013, the AP's Twitter account was hacked to release a hoax tweet about fictional attacks in the White House that left Barack Obama, President Obama injured.


Justice Department subpoena of phone records

On May 13, 2013, The Associated Press announced telephone records for 20 of their reporters during a two-month period in 2012, had been subpoenaed by the U.S. Justice Department and described these acts as a "massive and unprecedented intrusion" into news-gathering operations. The AP reported that the Justice Department would not say why it sought the records, but sources stated that the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia's office was conducting a criminal investigation into a May 7, 2012 AP story about a Central Intelligence Agency, CIA operation that prevented a terrorist plot to detonate an explosive device on a commercial flight. The DOJ did not direct subpoenas to the AP, instead going to their phone providers, including Verizon Wireless. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder testified under oath in front of the House Judiciary Committee that he recused himself from the leak investigations to avoid any appearance of a conflict of interest. Holder said his Deputy Attorney General, James M. Cole, was in charge of the AP investigation and would have ordered the subpoenas.


African climate activist cropped from a photo

In January 2020, AP cropped Ugandan climate activist Vanessa Nakate out from a photo she appeared in featuring her with Greta Thunberg and activists Luisa Neubauer, Isabelle Axelsson, and Loukina Tille after they all attended the World Economic Forum in Davos. Nakate accused the "various" outlets of doing so out of racist motives. Associated Press later changed the photo and indicated there was no ill intent, and apologized.


AP deal with Nazi Germany

The AP gave the Nazi regime access to its photo archives for its antisemitic propaganda. Investigators (chiefly Norman Domeier of the University of Vienna) have in recent years brought to wider attention the (well known in some circles) secret that there was a deal between Associated Press and the German government related to the interchange of press photos during the period in which the United States was at war with Germany. This relationship involved the Buro Laux, run by the photographer, Helmut Laux. The mechanism for this interchange was that a courier flew to Lisbon and back each day transporting photos from and for Germany's wartime enemy, the US, via diplomatic pouch. The transactions were initially conducted at the AP bureau under Luiz Lupi in Lisbon, and from 1944, when the exchange via Lisbon took too long, also at the AP bureau in Stockholm under Eddie Shanke. Here, as a cover, the Swedish agency, , was involved as an intermediary. An estimated 40,000 photos were exchanged between the enemies in this way.


Israeli–Palestinian conflict

In his book ''Broken Spring: An American-Israeli Reporter's Close-up View of How Egyptians Lost Their Struggle for Freedom'', former AP correspondent Mark Lavie claimed that the editorial line of the Cairo bureau was that the conflict was Israel's fault and the Arabs and Palestinians were blameless. Israeli journalist Matti Friedman accused AP of killing a story he wrote about the "war of words", "between Israel and its critics in human rights organizations", in the aftermath of the Gaza War (2008–09), Israel/Gaza conflict of 2008–09.


Awards received

The AP has earned 54
Pulitzer Prizes#REDIRECT Pulitzer Prize The Pulitzer Prize () is an award for achievements in newspaper, magazine and online journalism, literature and musical composition within the United States. It was established in 1917 by provisions in the will of Joseph ...
, including 32 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. In May 2020, Dar Yasin, Mukhtar Khan, and Channi Anand of the AP were honored with the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography. The choice caused controversy, because it was taken by some as questioning "India's legitimacy over Kashmir" as it had used the word "independence" in regard to Revocation of the special status of Jammu and Kashmir, revocation of Article 370.


Governance

The Associated Press is governed by an elected board of directors. Since April 2017, the chairman is Steven Swartz, president and CEO of Hearst Communications.


See also

* Agence France-Presse * ''Associated Press v. Meltwater'' * Australian Associated Press * The Canadian Press * EFE * George E. Bria, George Emil Bria * International Press Telecommunications Council * List of news agencies * List of online image archives * NewsML * News Industry Text Format * Reuters * TweenTribune


References


Citations


Sources

* * * * * * Silberstein-Loeb, Jonathan. ''The International Distribution of News: The Associated Press, Press Association, and Reuters, 1848–1947'' (2014)


External links

*
AP News

AP Images

AP Stylebook

AP Archive
*
AP Fact Check

The Associated Press, Television-Radio Association of California, Nevada, Hawaii, Arizona, and New Mexico
{{Authority control Associated Press, 1846 establishments in New York (state) Sports mass media in the United States Cooperatives in the United States News agencies based in the United States Non-profit organizations based in New York City Photo archives in the United States Publications established in 1846 College football awards organizations Pulitzer Prize for Public Service winners Fact-checking websites Photo agencies Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography winners Multinational companies headquartered in the United States