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Shannon Pot
Shannon Pot or Legnashinna () is a pool in the Karst, karst landscape in the townland of Derrylahan near Cuilcagh Mountain in County Cavan, Republic of Ireland, Ireland. An aquifer-fed naturally fluctuating pool, it is the traditional source of the River Shannon. The pool itself is about wide, and has been dived to . Towns and villages near the Shannon Pot include Dowra, Blacklion and Glangevlin. History An early reference to the Pot is in the Book of Magauran. Poem X, stanza 2, composed c. 1349 by Giolla na Naomh Ó hUiginn, which states, (In it is the well whence comes the Shannon, noblest stream in Inis Fáil). Folklore According to legend, the Shannon is named after Sionnan, who was the granddaughter of Manannán mac Lir, the god of the sea. She came to this spot to eat the forbidden fruit of the Tree of Knowledge, which was planted by the druids. As she began to eat it, the waters of the pool sprang up and overwhelmed her. She was drawn down into the pool and its wate ...
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Townland
A townland ( ga, baile fearainn; Ulster-ScotsUlster Scots, also known as Scotch-Irish, may refer to: * Ulster Scots people The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots The Ulster Scots (Ulster Scots dialects, Ulster-Scots: ''Ulstèr-Scotch'', ga, Albanaigh na hUladh), also called Ulster Scots ...: ''toonlann'') is a small geographical division of land used in Ireland Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster Scots dialect, Ulster-Scots: ) is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel (Great Britain and Ireland), North Channel, the Irish Sea ... and in the Western Isles The Outer Hebrides () or Western Isles ( gd, Na h-Eileanan Siar or ; sco, Waster Isles), sometimes known as ("islands of the strangers") or the Long Isle/Long Island ( gd, An t-Eilean Fada, links=no), is an island chain off the west coast ... in Scotland. The townland system is of Gaelic Gaelic is an adjective that means "pertainin ...
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Manannán Mac Lir
Manannán or Manann, also known as Manannán mac Lir ("son of the sea"), is a warrior and king of the Tír na nÓg, Otherworld in Irish mythology who is associated with the sea and often interpreted as a Water deity, sea god, usually as a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He is seen as the ruler and guardian of the Celtic Otherworld, Otherworld, and his dominion is referred by such names as Emain Ablach, Mag Mell (Plain of Delights), or Tír na nÓg, Tír Tairngire (Land of Promise). He is described as over-king of the surviving Tuatha Dé after the advent of humans (Milesians (Irish), Milesians), and uses the mist of invisibility (''féth fíada'') to cloak the whereabouts of his home as well as the sidh dwellings of the others. In modern tales, he is said to own a self-navigating boat named ''Sguaba Tuinne'' ("Wave-sweeper"), a horse Enbarr, Aonbharr which can course over water as well as land, and a deadly strength-sapping sword named Fragarach, though the list does not end ...
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Florencecourt
Florencecourt is a small village in County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. In the United Kingdom Census 2001, 2001 Census it had a population (with Drumlaghy) of 135 people. It is situated within Fermanagh and Omagh district. Historically the area was called "Mullanashangan" (). Background The village contains 39 houses and an Orange Institution, Orange Hall. Florencecourt Primary School is located at Drumlaghy, where there is also a doctors' surgery and dispensary. Florencecourt post office and local shop closed on 4 November 2006. The Tully Mill Complex is a group of new buildings built around a restored corn mill; this complex consists of the Larganess Centre, Tully Mill Bar and Restaurant and the Benaughlin Holiday Cottages. The Gortatole Outdoor Education Centre in Florencecourt is situated on the shore of Lower Lough MacNean beneath the imposing cliffs of the Hanging Rock, County Fermanagh, Hanging Rock. It has had a series of refurbishments in the last year including a n ...
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Cuilcagh Mountain
Cuilcagh () is a mountain on the border between County Fermanagh (in Northern Ireland) and County Cavan (in the Republic of Ireland). With a height of it is the highest point in both counties. It is also the 170th highest peak on the island of Ireland, and Ireland's only Republic of Ireland–United Kingdom border, cross-border county top. Water from the southern slope flows underground until it emerges some miles away in the Shannon Pot, the traditional source of the River Shannon. The area is sometimes referred to as the Cuilcagh Mountains. Naming The name Cuilcagh comes from the Irish ''Cuilceach'', which has been translated as "chalky". However, the mountain is mainly sandstone and shale, covered with bog and heather. The cliff-edged summit surface of the mountain is formed from the hard-wearing Leitrim Group#Lackagh Sandstone Formation, Lackagh Sandstone which itself overlies the Leitrim Group#Briscloonagh Sandstone Formation, Briscloonagh Sandstone. "It is possible that th ...
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Badger Pot
Badger Pot and Pigeon Pot are two caves found in the Karst topography on the eastern slopes of Cuilcagh Mountain, south of Florencecourt Forest Park, County Fermanagh, Northern Ireland. They are sourced from small rivers which, at each pot, sink below ground. Dye tracing has linked these sinks to the underground river of the ''Prod's Pot–Cascades'' cave system. This river in turn Spring (hydrosphere), rises at Cladagh Glen and feeds into the Cladagh River, before ultimately discharging into Upper Lough Erne. The dye tracing has also proved a further underground link to Shannon Pot in County Cavan, suggesting that the latter may once have had a substantially larger catchment area. See also * Marble Arch Caves References Further reading

* Caves of Northern Ireland Landforms of County Fermanagh {{Fermanagh-geo-stub ...
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County Fermanagh
County Fermanagh ( ; ) is one of the thirty-two counties A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposes Chambers Dictionary, L. Brookes (ed.), 2005, Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, Edinburgh in certain modern nations. The term is derived from the Old French ... of Ireland Ireland ( ; ga, Éire ; Ulster Scots dialect, Ulster-Scots: ) is an island in the Atlantic Ocean, North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel (Great Britain and Ireland), North Channel, the Irish Sea ..., one of the six counties A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposes Chambers Dictionary, L. Brookes (ed.), 2005, Chambers Harrap Publishers Ltd, Edinburgh in certain modern nations. The term is derived from the Old French ... of Northern Ireland Northern Ireland ( ga, Tuaisceart Éireann ; sco, label=Ulster-ScotsUlster Scots, also known as Scotch-Irish, ...
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Drainage Area
A drainage basin is any area of land where precipitation collects and drains off into a common outlet, such as into a river, bay, or other body of water. The drainage basin includes all the surface water from surface runoff, rain runoff, snowmelt, hail, sleet and nearby streams that run downslope towards the shared outlet, as well as the groundwater underneath the earth's surface. Drainage basins connect into other drainage basins at lower elevations in a Strahler number, hierarchical pattern, with smaller sub-drainage basins, which in turn drain into another common outlet. Other terms for ''drainage basin'' are wiktionary:catchment, catchment area, catchment basin, drainage area, river basin, water basin, and impluvium. In North America, the term ''watershed'' is commonly used to mean a drainage basin, though in other English-speaking countries, it is used only in its original sense, that of a drainage divide. In a closed drainage basin, or endorheic basin, the water converg ...
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Artur Kozłowski (speleologist)
Artur (Conrad) Kozłowski (17 October 1977 – 5 September 2011) was a Poland, Polish cave diving, cave diver who spent his last years in Ireland. Amongst other achievements in cave exploration, he set the record for the deepest cave dive in British Isles, Great Britain and Ireland at a depth of . Biography Career Kozłowski came to Ireland from Poznań, in Poland, in 2006 and worked as a quantity surveyor. His projects included the Aviva Stadium and Heuston Square developments in Dublin. He would later play an important role in compiling maps for Galway County Council and the National Roads Authority for the design and development of the N18 road (Ireland), N18 road (Now the M18 motorway (Ireland), M18 motorway). Introduction to cave diving When he moved to Ireland, Kozłowski was a qualified Underwater diving, diver, with 13 warm Open water diving, open water dives under his belt. Shortly after his arrival he became interested in underwater cave exploration, and began learning c ...
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Martyn Farr
Martyn Farr (born Crickhowell, Wales, March 3, 1951) is a leading exploratory cave diver and caver, known for his record-breaking cave dives and the exploration of many miles of previously undiscovered underground passages (e.g. in Ogof y Daren Cilau and Noon's Hole#Exploration, Noon's Hole). As an author and photographer he has written many books on the subject of cave diving history and techniques and caving locations. Life and career Farr began caving in 1961 and cave diving in 1971, and within 10 years had established a world record for underwater cave penetration in the Bahamas. He is noted within the cave diving community for his explorations in Wookey Hole Caves, Wookey Hole in 1977 and 1982, and for completing the first traverse of Llangattock (Crickhowell), Llangattock Mountain in Wales in 1986, the execution of which was a televised media event, being the longest and deepest caving through trip in the British Isles. In 1978, Farr discovered also the Pollatoomary cave in ...
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Cave Diving
Cave diving is underwater diving Underwater diving, as a human activity, is the practice of descending below the water's surface to interact with the environment. Immersion in water and exposure to high ambient pressure have physiological effects that limit the depths and d ... in water-filled cave A cave or cavern is a natural void in the Earth#Surface, ground, specifically a space large enough for a human to enter. Caves often form by the weathering of rock and often extend deep underground. The word ''cave'' can also refer to much small ...s. It may be done as an extreme sport, a way of exploring flooded caves for scientific investigation, or for the search for and recovery of divers lost as a result of one of these activities. The equipment used varies depending on the circumstances, and ranges from breath hold to surface supplied, but almost all cave diving is done using scuba equipment A scuba set is any breathing apparatus that is carried entirely by an u ...
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Blacklion
Blacklion (; also ''An Leargaidh'') is a Republic of Ireland-United Kingdom border, border village in west County Cavan, Ireland. It is situated on the N16 road (Ireland), N16 national primary road, just across the border from the County Fermanagh village of Belcoo. History The village is within the townland of Tuam (). A stone cairn, a cist, burial cist and two stone are all within the townland, giving evidence of early habitation. The ruins of the mediaeval Killesher Church lie about 2.6 miles south-east of Blacklion. The ruins sit on a hillside in the south-west of County Fermanagh, between Blacklion and Cladagh Bridge, very close to Hanging Rock, County Fermanagh, the Hanging Rock and overlooking both the Gortatole Outdoor Education Centre and Lower lough macnean, Lower Lough Macnean. The current ruins sit on an Early Christian ecclesiastical site associated with St. Lasser or St. Lasair. The modern Parish of Killesher in both the Diocese of Kilmore (Roman Catholic), Dioc ...
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Glangevlin
Glangevlin () is situated in the northwest of County Cavan, Republic of Ireland, Ireland, in the townlands of Gub (Glangevlin) and Tullytiernan, at the junction of the R200 road (Ireland), R200 and R207 road (Ireland), R207 regional roads. It is surrounded by the Cuilcagh Mountains and borders the counties of County Leitrim, Leitrim and County Fermanagh, Fermanagh. A large stone known as 'Maguire's chair' is deposited on the right hand side of the road, roughly 4 miles from Glangevlin village, so-called because it was supposedly the inauguration site of the Maguire clan in medieval times. Glangevlin has a strong traditional Irish background and Irish was spoken up until the 1930s, one of the last places in Cavan where this was commonplace. Glangevlin is also well known to have been the last place in Ireland to have a glacier lasting from the Ice age. The Cuilcagh mountains were the last affected part of the island of Ireland as well as the most western part of Europe bar Ic ...
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