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The event of Ghadir Khumm
The event of Ghadir Khumm
( Arabic
Arabic
and Persian: واقعه غدیر خم) is an event that took place in March 632. While returning from the Hajj pilgrimage, the Islamic prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
gathered all the Muslims who were with him and gave a long sermon. This sermon included Muhammad's declaration that "to whomsoever I am Mawla, Ali
Ali
is also their Mawla." After the sermon, Muhammad
Muhammad
instructed everyone to pledge allegiance to Ali. Shia Muslims
Shia Muslims
believe this event to be the official appointment of Ali as Muhammad's successor.[3] The day's anniversary in the Islamic calendar (18 Dhu al-Hijjah) is celebrated by Muslims (primarily Shias) as Eid al-Ghadeer.

Contents

1 Background 2 Event

2.1 Revelation of the verse of announcement 2.2 The sermon 2.3 Revelation of the verse of Ikmal al-Din 2.4 Oath of allegiance 2.5 Interpretation and analysis

3 Narrators and citations 4 Aftermath

4.1 Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphate 4.2 Umayyad Caliphate 4.3 Eid al-Ghadeer

5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External links

Background[edit] Main article: Farewell Pilgrimage Ten years after the migration and on the last days of Dhu al-Qi'dah (coinciding with 632 in the Gregorian calendar), Muhammad
Muhammad
moved from Medina
Medina
to Mecca
Mecca
accompanied by thousands of his followers. He only once attended Hajj rituals, a few months before he died. Since this Hajj took place in the last year of his life, he made his farewells to people. Ali
Ali
was in Yemen, preaching Islam, when he was informed about Muhammad's Hajj, so he moved towards Mecca
Mecca
together with some people and joined Muhammad
Muhammad
before rituals began. When the rituals of Hajj were finished, Muhammad
Muhammad
left Mecca
Mecca
for Medina
Medina
together with other Muslims.[4][5] Event[edit] Revelation of the verse of announcement[edit] On Thursday the 18th of Dhu al-Hijjah
Dhu al-Hijjah
in the year 10 A.H. (March 632), after the Farewell Pilgrimage, the Muslims arrived at Ghadir Khumm. The following verse of the Quran
Quran
was revealed: O Messenger! proclaim the (message) which hath been sent to thee from thy Lord. If thou didst not, thou wouldst not have fulfilled and proclaimed His mission. And Allah
Allah
will defend thee from men (who mean mischief). For Allah
Allah
guideth not those who reject Faith
Faith
(5:67).[6] According to the verse, Muhammad
Muhammad
was obliged to proclaim an important message. The verse clearly denotes the importance of the message, by saying that if he does not announce it, then he has not performed his mission. After revelation of the verse, Muhammad
Muhammad
ordered the caravan to stop, and ordered those who had passed Ghadir Khumm to return, and for them to wait there until the arrival of those who were still on their way.[7][8] Both Shia
Shia
and Sunni sources state that this verse relates to the event of Ghadir Khumm. According to Sunni traditional narratives, this verse was revealed during the event[9][7][8][10], and over 360 Sunnis traditional scholars have mentioned about Ghadir and its connection with the mentioned verse.[11] The sermon[edit] On the way back to Medina
Medina
from Mecca, Muhammad
Muhammad
ordered his companions to stop at Ghadir Khum and delivered a lengthy sermon. The most well-known part of the sermon occurred when he raised Ali's hand and said, "whomever I am his Mawla, this Ali
Ali
is his Mawla."[12][13] When Abu Bakr
Abu Bakr
and Umar
Umar
heard this, they said to Ali: "O son of Abu Talib, you have become the Mawla of every male and every female believer, morning and evening, congratulations."[14][15][16] A portion of a part of sermon is as follows:

O people, Allah
Allah
the Most Kind the Omniscient has told me that no apostle lives to more than half the age of him who had preceded him. I think I am about to be called (to die) and thus I must respond. I am responsible and you are responsible, then what do you say?' They said, 'We witness that you have informed, advised and striven. May Allah bless you.' He said, 'Do you not bear witness that there is no god but Allah
Allah
and that Muhammad
Muhammad
is His servant and Apostle, and that His Heaven is true, His Hell
Hell
is true, death is true, the Resurrection after death is true, that there is no doubt that the Day of Judgment will come, and that Allah
Allah
will resurrect the dead from their graves?' They said, 'Yes, we bear witness.' He said, 'O Allah, bear witness.' Then he said, 'O people, Allah
Allah
is my Lord and I am the lord of the believers. I am worthier of believers than themselves. Of whomsoever I had been Mawla, Ali
Ali
here is to be his Mawla.[a] O Allah, be a supporter of whoever supports him (Ali) and an enemy of whoever opposes him and divert the Truth to Ali.'

O people, I will go ahead of you and you will arrive at my Pond (in Heaven) which is wider than the distance between Basra and San'a. It has receptacles as numerous as the stars, and two cups of gold and two of silver. I will ask you about the two weighty things that I have left for you when you come to me to see how you dealt with them. The greater weighty thing is Allah's book—the Holy Qur'an. One end is in Allah's hand and the other is in your hands. Keep it and you will not deviate. That other weighty thing is my family (Ahl al-Bayt) and my descendents. The Most Kind the Omniscient had told me that both of them, would not separate until they come to my Pond.

Another similar narration of part of the hadith goes as follows,

O people! Reflect on the Quran
Quran
and comprehend its verses. Look into its clear verses and do not follow its ambiguous parts, for by Allah, none shall be able to explain to you its warnings and its mysteries, nor shall anyone clarify its interpretation, other than the one that I have grasped his hand, brought up beside myself,(and lifted his arm), the one about whom I inform you that whomever I am his Mawla, this Ali is his Mawla; and he is Ali
Ali
Ibn Abi Talib, my brother, the executor of my will (Wasiyyi), whose appointment as your guardian and leader has been sent down to me from Allah, the mighty and the majestic.[18]

Revelation of the verse of Ikmal al-Din[edit] Main article: The verse of Ikmal al-Din According to Shia
Shia
scholar Sheikh Abdul Hosein Amini's work Al-Ghadir, immediately after Muhammad
Muhammad
had finished his speech, the following verse of the Quran
Quran
was revealed:[19][20][21]

This day have those who reject faith given up all hope of your religion: yet fear them not but fear Me. This day have I perfected your religion for you, completed My favour upon you, and have chosen for you Islam
Islam
as your religion (5:3).

Sunni Muslims believe this verse was revealed during the Farewell Pilgrimage of the Prophet Muhammad
Muhammad
on the Day of Arafah, the ninth day of Dhul Hijja.[22] Oath of allegiance[edit] Only then, Muhammad
Muhammad
left the rostrum, and gave the order for the establishment of a tent in which Ali
Ali
would sit to receive the allegiance oath of Muslims. Thousands of people, group by group, including women, went to him and saluted and congratulated him as Amir al-Mu'minin, commander of the faithful. Umar
Umar
ibn Al-Khattab was the first to offer congratulations.[4][23][24] On the completion of Muhammad's sermon, Umar
Umar
( Umar
Umar
al-Khattab) said, "Congratulations to you, Ali! This morning has brought you a great blessing. Today you have become the Mawla of all believing men and women." At a later occasion when Umar
Umar
was asked about his special treatment to Ali
Ali
as compared to other companions, his reply was, "He is my master."[25][26][27][28] Shias believe that, with Muhammad's approbation he recited verses in honour of Ali. The verse are recorded in Ibn Shahrashoub and affirms that ʿAlī was named as the successor of Muhammad
Muhammad
on the day of Ghadir Khum.[17] Mir Sayyid Ali
Ali
Hamadani, writes in his book, Mawaddat al-Qurba
Mawaddat al-Qurba
in Mawadda 5, that many companions quoted Umar
Umar
in different places as having said that Muhammad
Muhammad
made Ali
Ali
the chief and leader of the nation and that Muhammad
Muhammad
announced publicly that Ali
Ali
was their master. Umar was also quoted saying that on the day of that announcement, a handsome youth was sitting besides him and that the youth said to him, "Surely, the Prophet has bound a covenant which none but a hypocrite would break. So Umar! Avoid breaking it." When Umar
Umar
told Muhammad about the incident, Muhammad
Muhammad
said that the youth was not of Adam's (Adem) progeny but was Gabriel
Gabriel
(Jibril) and was stressing the point about Ali. It is also reported that Abu Bakr
Abu Bakr
said to Ali, "Well done Ibn Abi Talib! Today you became the leader (Mawla) of all believing men and women." Abu Bakr, Umar, and Uthman
Uthman
are all said to have given their allegiance to Ali, a fact that is reported by both Shia
Shia
and Sunni sources.[29][30][31] Interpretation and analysis[edit] The word mawla is significant in the first narration of this hadith, and can refer to a leader, client, patron, friend, partner, ally or numerous other similar relationships.[32] Twenty-seven (27) different meanings are given for the word mawla and hence the exact meaning should be derived from their syntactical and situational contexts.[33] Unlike the words "Imam, Ameer, Khalifah, Ulil-Amr, Sultan" which are very clear words to describe leader, the word "Mawla" is more ambiguous.[34][35][citation needed] However, Shias argue that the context of the sermon makes it clear that the word Mawla is meant as leader.[36] It is also noteworthy that the Prophet used many titles for Ali
Ali
in the sermon. The words "Wali," "Mawla," and "Imam" were used over 27 times, indicating that Ali
Ali
as the successor to Muhammad
Muhammad
in a spiritual sense, as well as a political sense (as the word "Khalifa" was used three times in the sermon).[37] Hence, the sermon established Ali's right as the political and spiritual successor to Muhammad. According to some, the event of Ghadir Khumm took place because of a dispute between Ali
Ali
and two sahaba in Yemen
Yemen
prior to the Farewell Pilgrimage.[38] When Muhammad
Muhammad
found out about this dispute, he ordered his companions to never anger Ali. The dispute was thus resolved with Muhammad's statement before the Farewell Pilgrimage. This indicates that there was no need to gather over a hundred thousand people around to discuss the dispute after the pilgrimage, as the dispute had already been settled.[39] Narrators and citations[edit] The event of Ghadir Khumm
The event of Ghadir Khumm
has been revealed in both Shia
Shia
and Sunni sources. However, Sunnis disagree with the Shia
Shia
interpretation of this Hadith. Narrators of the Hadith
Hadith
of Ghadir Khumm are many, including:

Ahl al-Bayt: Ali, Fatimah, Hasan ibn Ali
Ali
and Husayn ibn Ali[citation needed] 110 Sahabah
Sahabah
(companions) of Muhammad: Umar,[40] Uthman, Aisha,[41] Abu Hurairah,[42] Abu Dhar al-Ghifari,[citation needed] Salman the Persian,[43] Ammar ibn Yasir,[citation needed] Zubayr ibn al-Awam,[44] Jabir ibn Abd Allah,[45] and others, who were all present at Ghadir Khum and narrated the event directly. 83 of the Tabi‘un
Tabi‘un
(followers): Salim ibn Abd-Allah, Umar
Umar
II, Tawus ibn Kaysan, and etc. 360 Sunni scholars of 2nd to 4th century AH: Abū ʿAbdullāh Muhammad ibn Idrīs al-Shāfīʿī (the founder of the Shafi'i
Shafi'i
school), Ahmad ibn Hanbal (the founder of the Hanbali
Hanbali
school), Al-Nasa'i, Ibn al-Maghazili, Ahmad
Ahmad
ibn Abd Allah, and Ahmad
Ahmad
ibn Abd Rabbih. Shia
Shia
Hadith
Hadith
scholars: Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Ya'qub al-Kulayni, Ibn Babawayh, Al-Shaykh Al-Mufid, Sharif al-Murtaza, and etc.

This Hadith
Hadith
is considered to be Hasan by many scholars, and some consider it Sahih. Furthermore, all Shia
Shia
Hadith
Hadith
scholars, and some great Sunni scholars, consider this Hadith
Hadith
to be Mutawatir. Shia scholar Sheikh Abdul Hosein Amini collected all the references for the event of Ghadir Khum from Sunni sources and issued them together with all other reasons for this event in eleven volumes in of his book Al-Ghadir.[24] The above hadith have been cited in various Sunni sources including:

Ahmad ibn Hanbal
Ahmad ibn Hanbal
in Musnad Ahmad
Ahmad
ibn Hanbal[46][47][48][49][50][51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59][60][61][62][63][64][65] Al-Nasa'i
Al-Nasa'i
in Al-Khasa'is[66][67][68][69][70][71][72][73][74][75][76][77][78] Ibn 'Asakir in The History of Damascus[79][80][81][82][83][84][85][86][87][88][89][90][91][92][93][94][95][96][97][98][99][100][101][102][103][104][105][106][107][108][109][110][111][112][113][114][115][116][117][118][119][120][121] Ali
Ali
ibn al-Athir in Usud al-Ghabah fi Ma'rifah al-Sahabah[122][123][124][125][126][127][128][129][130][131][132][133][134][135][136][137][138][139][140][141][142][143][144][145][146] Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib[147][148][149][150][151][152][153][154][155] Ibn Majah
Ibn Majah
in Sunan ibn Majah[156][157] Ali
Ali
ibn Abu Bakr
Abu Bakr
al-Haythami in Majma al-Zawa'id[158][159][160] Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Yusuf al-Kanji ash-Shafii in Kifayat at-Talib[161][162][163] Ibn Hajar al-Asqalani in Al-Isaba[164][165][166] Izz al-Din ibn Hibatullah ibn Abi l-Hadid in Sharh Nahjul Balagha[167] Abu Nu`aym in Hilyat al-awliya'[168][169][170] Al-Khatib al-Baghdadi in The History of Baghdad[171][172][173][174][175] Al-Kuna wa al-Asma[176][177] Ahmad
Ahmad
ibn Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Tahawi in Mushkil ul-Athar[178] Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn `Isa at-Tirmidhi in Jami` at-Tirmidhi[179] Muwazihul-Awham[180] Ibn Kathir
Ibn Kathir
in Al-Kafi ash-Shafi[181][182] Ibn Kathir
Ibn Kathir
in Tafsir ibn Kathir[183][184][185][186] Al-Tabarani in Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer[187][188][189][190][191] Ibn Kathir
Ibn Kathir
in Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya[192][193][194][195][196][196][197][198][199] Abu Abdullah al-Hakim Nishapuri in Al-Mustadrak alaa al-Sahihain[200][201] Al-Dhahabi in Talkhis al-Mustadrak[202] Arjah ul-Matalib[203][204] Muḥammad ibn Mūsā al-Khwārizmī's Manaqib[205][206][207][208][209][210][211] Al-Tabarani in Al-Mu'jam As-Saghir[212] Ibn Abi Hatim in Al-Jarh wa at-Ta'dil[213] Al-Dhahabi in The History of Islam[214][215] Al-Juwayni in Fara'id al-Simtayn[216][217][218][219][220][221] al-Hasaqani in Du'atul-Hudat[222] Ibn Qutaybah in Al-Imama wa al-Siyasa[223] Ahmad
Ahmad
in Manaqib[224][225] Hafiz al-Dhahabi in Mizanul-I'tidal[226] Abd Al Husayn Amini, Iranian Shia
Shia
scholar also has gathered narrations of more than 110 companions (Sahaba) of Muhammad, as well as 40 followers of Muhammad
Muhammad
about this event in his book named Al Ghadir.

Aftermath[edit] Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliphate[edit] See also: Succession to Muhammad
Muhammad
and Abu Bakr
Abu Bakr
§ Election of Abu Bakr to Caliphate After the death of Muhammad, a gathering at Saqifah
Saqifah
elected Abu Bakr, rather than Ali, to be the successor of Muhammad
Muhammad
as the first Rashidun Caliph. This choice was disputed by some Muslims, who believed that Ali
Ali
had been appointed as successor. This dispute led to the schism between Sunnis and Shias. Umayyad Caliphate[edit] After the First Fitnah, during the days of the Umayyad Caliphate, when Muawiyah arrived (in Mecca) during one of his pilgrimages, accordingly, Sa`d ibn Abi Waqqas
Sa`d ibn Abi Waqqas
came to see him, and they happened to mention Ali. Muawiyah disparaged Ali. As a result, Sa`d became angry and said: "You are speaking of this man! I have heard the Messenger of Allah—peace and salutation of Allah
Allah
be upon him—declare (On the day of Ghadir): "Of whomsoever I am the Mawla, then Ali
Ali
is his Mawla." I have (also) heard him say: 'You Ali
Ali
are to me in position that Harun was to Musa, except that there is no prophet after me (See Hadith
Hadith
of position)." And I have heard him announce: "Today I am indeed going to hand over the banner to a person who loves Allah
Allah
and his Messenger, and Allah
Allah
and his Messenger also loves him."[227] Eid al-Ghadeer[edit] Shias celebrate the occasion of Muhammad
Muhammad
declaring Ali
Ali
as a Mawla on the 18th of Dhu al-Hijjah.[17][228] Fasting, doing Ghusl
Ghusl
(ritual bath), reciting the Du'a Nudba
Du'a Nudba
and giving food to believers is among recommended practice of Eid al-Ghadeer. It is a public holiday in several places, such as Iran
Iran
and Telangana, India. See also[edit]

Shia
Shia
Islam
Islam
portal

The verse of Wilayah Hadith
Hadith
of the two weighty things Hadith
Hadith
of the Twelve Successors Hadith
Hadith
of giving Zakat while in Ruku Hadith
Hadith
of Mubahala Hadith
Hadith
of Fatima tablet Hadith
Hadith
of Warning Ahl al-Kisa Nahj al-Balagha Umar
Umar
at Fatimah's house Succession to Muhammad Rabigh

Notes[edit]

^ Man kunṫu mawlāhu fa-ʿAlī mawlāh (Arabic: مَـن كُـنـت مَـولاه فَـعَـلي مَـولاه‎).[17]

References[edit]

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ibn Muhammad. Manaqib. Beirut: Dar al-Adhwa. p. 69.  ^ Himaway al Juwayni, Ibrahim b Muhammad. Fara'id al-Simtayn. Beirut: Mahmudi. p. 315.  ^ Ibn al-Jazari, Muhammad. Asna al-Matalib. Isfahan: Maktabat al-Imam Amir al-Mu'menin. p. 48.  ^ Ibn 'Abd al-Barr, Yusuf ibn Abdallah. The Comprehensive Compilation of the Names of the Prophet's Companions (Arabic: الاستعياب في معرفة الاصحاب). 3. Beirut: Dar al-jil. p. 1099.  ^ Musnad, narrated by Zathan, from thirteen persons, vol. 1 p. 84 ^ Musnad, narrated by Ziyad bin Abu Ziyad, from twelve persons, who had fought in the battle of Badr. vol. 1 p. 88 ^ Musnad, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab, from five or six persons, vol. 5 p. 366 ^ Musnad, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab and Zayd bin Yathigh, from twelve persons vol. 1 p. 118 ^ Musnad, narrated by Zayd bin Arqam, from sixteen persons, vol. 5 p. 370 ^ Musnad, narrated by Abut-Tufayl, from many persons, vol. 4 p. 370 ^ Musnad, narrated by Abut-Tufayl, from thirty persons, vol. 4 p. 370 ^ Musnad, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin Abu Leyla, to twelve people, vol. 1 p. 118 ^ Musnad, narrated by Riyah bin al-Harith, from some of the Ansar, vol. 5 p. 419 ^ Musnad, narrated by Riyah bin al-Harith, from some people, vol. 5 p. 419 ^ Musnad, narrated by Sa'id bin Ubayda, from ibn Burayda, from his father, vol. 5 p. 358 ^ Musnad, narrated by Sa'id bin Ubayda from another direction vol. 5 p. 358 ^ Musnad, narrated by Umar
Umar
bin Maymun, from Ibn Abbas, vol. 1 p. 331 ^ Musnad, narrated by Abu Ubayd, from Ibn Maymun, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 4 p. 372 ^ Musnad, narrated by Abdul-Malik, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 4 p. 370 ^ Musnad, narrated by To Atiya, vol. 4 p. 370 ^ Musnad, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib from another chain of narrators, vol. 4 p. 281 ^ Musnad, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib from another chain of narrators, vol. 4 p. 282 ^ Musnad, narrated by Abu Maryam and one of Imam Ali's Companions, vol. 1, p. 152 ^ Musnad, narrated by Ibn Abbas, vol. 1 p. 331 ^ Al-Khasa'is, Sa'id bin Wahhab, from five or six persons p. 21 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab, from six persons – p. 26 and 40 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Zayd bin Yathigh, from six persons—p. 26 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Amr bin Sa'd, from six persons, Al-Khasa'is, p. 21 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Amr Dhi Mur, to some persons p. 40 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Ibn Abbas bin Burayda, p. 21 ^ Al-Khasa'is, From another direction to Ibn Abbas from Burayda, p. 21 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Sa'id bin Umayr, from ibn Burayda, from his father, p. 21 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Aamir bin Wathila, p. 24 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Auf, from Ibn Maymun, from Zayd bin Arqam, p. 22. ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Abu at-Tufayl, from Zayd bin Arqam-Al Khasa'is, p. 21 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by Ayman, from Sa'd bin Abu Waqqas, p. 4 ^ Al-Khasa'is, narrated by 'Aa'isha bint Sa'd, from Sa'd bin Abu Waqqas, 24–25 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab, from six persons vol. 2 p. 28 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Amr Dhi Mur, Sa'id bin Wahhab and Zayd bin Yathigh, from thirteen persons, vol. 2 p. 18 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Amr Dhi Mur and Sa'id bin Wahhab, from six or seven persons—vol. 2 p. 19 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab and Abd Khayr, from some persons, vol. 2 p. 20 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin Abu Leyla vol. 2 p. 9 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Also Abdur-Rahman bin Abu Leyla, vol. 2 p. 9 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Salama from Hudhayfa bin Usayd vol. 2 p. 45 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Sa'd bin Abu Waqqas, vol. 2 p. 53 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Umar
Umar
bin al-Khattab, vol. 2 p. 80 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Malik bin al-Huwayrith, vol. 2 p. 80 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Ibrahim bin al-Husayn, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2 p. 72 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu 'Ishaq al-Khitabi, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2 p. 74 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Mansur bin abul-Aswad, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2 p. 74 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu Ya'la, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2p. 74 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abdullah bin Adiy, from Abu Hurayra vol. 2 p. 75 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Habshun, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2 p. 75 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Ali
Ali
bin Shu'eib, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2 p. 76 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Ad-Daqqaq, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 2 p. 77 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Samra bin Jundub, vol. 2 p. 71 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Shuriet bin Anas, vol. 2 p. 72 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Qubaysa, from Jabir bin Abdullah, vol. 2 p. 65 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Qubaysa, from someone else, vol. 2 p. 63 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Muhammad
Muhammad
bin al-Munkadir, from Jabir bin Abdullah, vol. 2 p. 65 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abdullah bin Muhammad
Muhammad
bin Aqil, from someone else, vol. 2 p. 62 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin Bahman, vol. 2 p. 63 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu Bastam, Usama's freed slave, vol. 2 p. 86 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Ali
Ali
bin Khadim, from Abu Sa'id, vol. 2 p. 69 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated From another chain of narrators to Shu'ba, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 42 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Atiya al-Aufi, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 39 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu Surayha or Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 36 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu Abdullah ash-Shami, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 38 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Habibu l-Iskafi, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 41 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu 'Ishaq, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 41 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib from a tenth chain of narrators, vol. 2 p. 48 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib from an eleventh chain of narrators, vol. 2 p. 50 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib, from another chain of narrators, vol. 2 p. 50 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu 'Ishaq, from al-Bara' bin Aazib and Zayd bin Arqam vol. 2 p. 52 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Amr Dhi Mur, vol. 2 p. 30 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Al-Husayn bin Ali, from Imam Ali, vol. 2, p. 26 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Umar
Umar
bin Ali, from Imam Ali, vol. 2 p. 28 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Abu at-Tufayl, from Imam Ali, vol. 2, p. 20 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Zayd bin Arqam, from Imam Ali, vol. 2, p. 20 ^ The History of Damascus, narrated by Ibn Umar, vol. 2 p. 83 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Habba bin Juwayn al-Urani, vol. 1 p. 376 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Jundu' bin Amr bin Mazin, vol. 1 p. 308 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Ya'la bin Murra, vol. 3 p. 233 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Abu Ayyub, vol. 5 p. 6 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Abu at-Tufeil, from Abu Qudama, vol. 5 p. 276 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Ya'la, from Aamir bin Leyla, vol. 3 p. 93 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Ya'la bin Murra, from Yazid or Zayd bin Shuraheel, vol. 2 p. 233 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Hudhayfa bin Usayd and Aamir bin Leyla bin Zamra, vol. 3 p. 92 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Aamir bin Leyla from another chain of narrators, vol. 3 p. 93 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Abu Amra, from Amr bin Mahz, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Abu Zaynab, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Sahl bin Hunayf, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Khuzayma bin Thabit, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Abdullah bin Thabit al-Ansari, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Habashi bin Junada, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Ubayd bin Aazib, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Nu'Man bin Ajlan, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Thabit bin Wadi'a, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Abu Fuzala al-Ansari, vol. 3 p. 307 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Najiya bin Amr al-Khuza'i, vol. 5 p. 6 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Miqdad bin Amr, vol. 5 p. 6 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Al-Asbagh, from Ubayd bin Aazib al-Ansari, vol. 3 p. 307 and vol. 5 p. 205 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Habib bin Badil bin Warqa', vol. 1 p. 368 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Qays bin Thabit bin Shamaas, vol. 1 p. 367 ^ Usud al-Ghabah, narrated by Hashim bin Utba, vol. 1 p. 368 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Abd Khayr, Amr Dhi Mur and Habbatul-Urani, from twelve people, p. 20 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Hamid at-Tawil, from Anas ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Abu Salama, from Muhammad
Muhammad
bin al-Munkadir, p. 25 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Al-Hakam bin Abu Sulayman, from Zayd bin Arqam, p. 23 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Abuz-Zuha, from Zayd bin Arqam, p. 20 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Zayd's wife, from Zayd bin Arqam, p. 16 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Abdullah bin Mas'ud, p. 23 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Atiyah, from ibn Abu Awfa, p. 24 ^ Ibnul-Maghazili's Manaqib, narrated by Umayra bin Sa'd, p. 26 ^ Sunan ibn Majah, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib, vol. 1 p. 55 ^ Sunan ibn Majah, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin Saabit, from Sa'd bin Abu Waqqas, vol. 1, p. 58 ^ Majma al-Zawa'id, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab, from thirteen persons vol. 9 ^ Majma al-Zawa'id, narrated by Abu Hurayra, Anas and Abu Sa'id, from nine persons and others, vol. 9 p. 708 ^ Majma al-Zawa'id, narrated by Hamid bin Imara, vol. 9p. 107 ^ Kifayat at-Talib, narrated by Sa'id bin Wahhab and Zayd bin Yathigh, from some persons p. 18 ^ Kifayat at-Talib, narrated by Abdullah bin Muhammad
Muhammad
bin Aqil, from Muhammad
Muhammad
bin al-Munkadir, p. 14 ^ Kifayat at-Talib, narrated by From another direction to Abu at-Tufayl, from Zayd bin Arqam, p. 13–14 ^ Al-Isaba, narrated by Abut-Tufayl, from seventeen persons, vol. 4 p. 156 ^ Al-Isaba, narrated by Al-Asbagh bin Nabata, from some persons, vol. 4 p. 80 ^ Al-Isaba, narrated by Abdullah bin Bamil, vol. 2 p. 374 ^ Sharh Nahjul Balagha, narrated by Abu Zumayla, from some persons ^ Hilyat al-awliya, narrated by Umayra bin Sa'd, from twelve persons, vol. 5 p. 26 ^ Hilyat al-awliya, narrated by Umar
Umar
bin Abdul-Aziz, from some persons, vol. 5 p. 364 ^ Hilyat al-awliya, narrated To Tawus, from Burayda, vol. 4 p. 23 ^ Tarikh Baghdad, narrated by Umayra, from eighteen persons, vol. 2 p. 13 ^ Tarikh Baghdad, narrated by Umayra, from other eight sources, vol. 2 p. 13 ^ Tarikh Baghdad, narrated by Musa bin Ayyub, from Abu Hurayra, vol. 8 p. 290 ^ Tarikh Baghdad, narrated by Al-Mansur, from his father, from his grandfather, from Ibn Abbas, vol. 12 p. 343 ^ Tarikh Baghdad, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin Abu Leyla, vol. 14 p. 236 ^ Al-Kuna wa al-Asma, narrated by Abu Qulaba, from more than ten people, vol. 2 p. 61 ^ Al-Kuna wa al-Asma, narrated by Abu 'Ishaq as-Subay'i, from al-Bara' bin Aazib, vol. 1 p. 160 ^ Mushkil ul-Athar, narrated by Abu 'Ishaq as-Subay'i, from more than ten people, vol. 2 p. 307 ^ Jami` at-Tirmidhi, narrated by Salama from Hudhayfa bin Usayd, vol. 13 p. 165 ^ Muwazihul-Awham, narrated by As'ad bin Zurara, from his father, vol. 1 p. 91 ^ Al-Kafi ash-Shafi, narrated by Isa bin Talha, from Talha bin Abdullah, p. 95 ^ Talha, p. 95 ^ Tafsir ibn Kathir, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin Abu Leyla from another direction, vol 2 p. 14 ^ Tafsir ibn Kathir, narrated by Abdur-Rahman bin abu Leyla, vol. 2 p. 14 ^ Tafsir ibn Kathir, narrated by To Abu at-Tufayl, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 14 ^ Tafsir ibn Kathir, narrated by Zayd bin Wahhab and Abd Khayr, from Imam Ali, vol. 2, p. 14 ^ Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer, narrated by Habashi bin Junada, p. 127 ^ Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer, narrated by Bishr bin Harb, from Jarir, p. 127 ^ Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer, narrated by Abu Ayyub, p. 157 ^ Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer, narrated to Abu at-Tufayl, from Zayd bin Arqam, p. 127 (Manuscript) ^ Al-Mu'jam al-Kabeer, narrated by Hudhayfa bin Usayd or Zayd bin Arqam, p. 157 (Manuscript) ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Amr Dhi Mur, vol. 5 p. 210 ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Bint Ka'b (Ka'b's daughter) from Abu Sa'id, vol. 5 p. 208 ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Abu Maryam or Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 7 p. 348 ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Yazid bin Talha, vol. 5 p. 108 ^ a b Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib, vol. 5 p. 208 ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Al Bara' bin Aazib, vol. 5 p. 208 ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated by Umar
Umar
bin Ali, from Imam Ali, vol. 5, p. 221 ^ Al-Bidaya wa'l-Nihaya, narrated From another direction to 'Aa'isha bint Sa'd from Sa'd bin abu Waqqas, vol. 5 p. 208 ^ Al-Mustadrak alaa al-Sahihain, narrated by Sa'd bin Malik, vol. 3 p. 116 ^ Al-Mustadrak alaa al-Sahihain, narrated by Ibn Wathila, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 3 p. 109 ^ Talkhis al-Mustadrak, narrated by Aamir bin Wathila, vol. 3 p. 109 ^ Arjah ul-Matalib, narrated by Abul-Hamra', p. 581 ^ Arjah ul-Matalib, narrated by Fatima binte Muhammad
Muhammad
p. 448 and 571 ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Al-Bazzar, from Abu Hurayra, p. 94 ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Al-Abdi, from Abu Sa'id ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Abd bin Thabit, from al-Bara' bin Aazib, p. 93 ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Aamir bin Wathila, from Imam Ali, vol. 1, p. 41 ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Salman, from Imam Ali, vol. 1 p. 41 ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Amr bin al-Aas, p. 125 ^ Al-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, narrated by Amr bin al-Aas-Khawarizmi's Manaqib, p. 126 ^ Al-Mu'jam As-Saghir, narrated by Tawus, from Burayda, vol. 1 p. 71 ^ Al-Jarh wa at-Ta'dil, narrated by Abu Leyla bin Sa'id, from his father, vol. 4 p. 431 ^ The History of Islam, narrated by Shu'ba, from Ibn Maymun, from Zayd bin Arqam, vol. 2 p. 196 ^ The History of Islam, narrated by Aamir bin Sa'd, from Sa'd bin Abu Waqqas, vol. 2 ^ Fara'id al-Simtayn, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib, vol. 1 p. 64 ^ Fara'id al-Simtayn, narrated by Al-Bara' bin Aazib from another direction, vol. 1 p. 65 ^ Fara'id al-Simtayn, narrated by Ammar bin Yasir, vol. 1 p. 195 ^ Fara'id al-Simtayn, narrated by Amr Dhi Mur, from Imam Ali, vol. 1, p. 67 ^ Fara'id al-Simtayn, narrated by Sulaym bin Qays, from some persons, one of them was Abu Dharr, vol. 1 p. 315 ^ Fara'id al-Simtayn, narrated by Hasan bin Thabit, vol. 1 p. 73 ^ Du'atul-Hudat, from Hudhayfa bin al-Yaman ^ Al-Imama wa al-Siyasa, from Amr bin al-Aas p. 93 ^ Salama, abu at-Tufeil from Hudhayfa bin Useid al-Ghifari ^ Tawus, from his father, Ahmad
Ahmad
bin Hanbal's Manaqib, (Manuscript) ^ Mizanul-I'tidal, Amr Dhi Mur, from Imam Ali, vol. 2 p. 303. ^ Ibn Majah, Sunan, Volume 1 Page 45, Cairo, 1952 CE, ^ Amir-Moezzi, Mohammad Ali
Ali
(2014). "Ghadīr Khumm". In Fleet, Kate; Krämer, Gudrun; Matringe, Denis; Nawas, John; Rowson, Everett. Encyclopaedia of Islam
Islam
(Third ed.). 

External links[edit]

Resources on Ghadeer The Event of Ghadir Khumm
Event of Ghadir Khumm
Shia
Shia
perspectives Did the Prophet(s) appoint a successor? (Narrations from Sunni Sources) An Exegesis of the Qur`anic Verses Indicating the Incident of Ghadir Khumm (Citations from Sunni Sources) Ghadir "Al-Muraja'at: A Shi'i-Sunni dialogue". Archived from the original on 2007-09-27.  (letters 55–58, which pertain to the Hadith
Hadith
of Ghadeer and its citations and interpretations from Sunni sources) Khetabe Ghadir Complete Sermon at Ghadir Khumm in English Version Ghadir, the Greatest Eid of All Religions Ghadir Khumm—Interesting Aspects of a Unique Event Did Umar
Umar
congratulate Ali? (Narrations from Sunni Sources)

v t e

People and things in the Quran

Characters

Non-humans

Allâh ("The God")

Names of Allah
Allah
found in the Quran

Beings in Paradise

Ghilmān or Wildān Ḥūr

Animals

Related

The baqarah (cow) of Israelites The dhi’b (wolf) that Jacob
Jacob
feared could attack Joseph The fīl (elephant) of the Abyssinians) Ḥimār (Domesticated donkey) The hud-hud (hoopoe) of Solomon The kalb (dog) of the sleepers of the cave The nāqaṫ (she-camel) of Saleh The nūn (fish or whale) of Jonah

Non-related

Ḥimār (Wild ass) Qaswarah
Qaswarah
('Lion', 'Beast of prey' or 'Hunter')

Jinns

‘Ifrîṫ ("Strong one") Mârid ("Rebellious one")

Iblīs the Shayṭān (Devil)

Qarīn

Prophets

Mentioned

Ādam (Adam) Al-Yasa‘ (Elisha) Ayyūb (Job) Dāwūd (David) Dhūl-Kifl (Ezekiel?) Hārūn (Aaron) Hūd (Eber?) Idrīs (Enoch?) Ilyās (Elijah) ‘Imrān (Joachim the father of Maryam) Is-ḥāq (Isaac) Ismā‘īl (Ishmael)

Dhabih Ullah

Isma'il Ṣādiq al-Wa‘d (Fulfiller of the Promise) Lūṭ (Lot) Ṣāliḥ Shu‘ayb (Jethro, Reuel or Hobab?) Sulaymān ibn Dāwūd ( Solomon
Solomon
son of David) ‘ Uzair
Uzair
(Ezra?) Yaḥyā ibn Zakariyyā ( John the Baptist
John the Baptist
the son of Zechariah) Ya‘qūb (Jacob)

Isrâ’îl (Israel)

Yūnus (Jonah)

Dhūn-Nūn ("He of the Fish
Fish
(or Whale)" or "Owner of the Fish
Fish
(or Whale)") Ṣāḥib al-Ḥūṫ ("Companion of the Whale")

Yūsuf ibn Ya‘qūb ( Joseph
Joseph
son of Jacob) Zakariyyā (Zechariah)

Ulu-l-‘Azm

Muḥammad

Aḥmad Other names and titles of Muhammad

ʿĪsā (Jesus)

Al-Masīḥ (The Messiah) Ibn Maryam (Son of Mary)

Mūsā Kalīmullāh ( Moses
Moses
He who spoke to God) Ibrāhīm Khalīlullāh ( Abraham
Abraham
Friend of God) Nūḥ (Noah)

Debatable ones

Dhūl-Qarnain (Cyrus the Great?) Luqmân Maryam (Mary) Ṭâlûṫ (Saul or Gideon?)

Implied

Irmiyā (Jeremiah) Ṣamû’îl (Samuel) Yūsha‘ ibn Nūn (Joshua, companion and successor of Moses)

People of Prophets

Evil ones

Āzar (possibly Terah) Fir‘awn ( Pharaoh
Pharaoh
of Moses' time) Hāmān Jâlûṫ (Goliath) Qārūn (Korah, cousin of Moses) As-Sāmirī Abî Lahab Slayers of Saleh's she-camel (Qaddar ibn Salif and Musda' ibn Dahr)

Good ones

Adam's immediate relatives

Martyred son Wife

Believer of Ya-Sin Family of Noah

Father Lamech Mother Shamkhah bint Anush or Betenos

Luqman's son People of Aaron and Moses

Believer of Fir'aun Family (Hizbil/Hizqil ibn Sabura) Imra’aṫ Fir‘awn (Âsiyá bint Muzâḥim or Bithiah) Khidr Magicians of the Pharaoh Moses' wife Moses' sister-in-law Mother Sister

People of Abraham

Mother Abiona or Amtelai the daughter of Karnebo Ishmael's mother Isaac's mother

People of Jesus

Disciples (including Peter) Mary's mother Zechariah's wife

People of Joseph

Brothers (including Binyāmin (Benjamin) and Simeon) Egyptians

‘Azîz (Potiphar, Qatafir or Qittin) Malik (King Ar-Rayyân ibn Al-Walîd)) Wife of ‘Azîz (Zulaykhah)

Mother

People of Solomon

Mother Queen of Sheba Vizier

Zayd

Implied or not specified

Abrahah Bal'am/Balaam Barsisa Caleb or Kaleb the companion of Joshua Luqman's son Nebuchadnezzar II Nimrod Rahmah the wife of Ayyub Shaddad

Groups

Mentioned

Aş-ḥāb al-Jannah

People of Paradise People of the Burnt Garden

Aş-ḥāb as-Sabṫ (Companions of the Sabbath) Christian
Christian
apostles

Ḥawāriyyūn (Disciples of Jesus)

Companions of Noah's Ark Aş-ḥāb al-Kahf war-Raqīm (Companions of the Cave and Al-Raqaim? Companions of the Elephant People of al-Ukhdūd People of a township in Surah Ya-Sin People of Yathrib or Medina Qawm Lûṭ (People of Sodom and Gomorrah) Nation of Noah

Tribes, ethnicities or families

A‘rāb (Arabs or Bedouins)

ʿĀd (people of Hud) Companions of the Rass Qawm Ṫubba‘ (People of Tubba')

People of Saba’ or Sheba

Quraysh Thamûd (people of Saleh)

Aṣ-ḥâb al-Ḥijr ("Companions of the Stoneland")

Ajam Ar- Rûm (literally "The Romans") Banî Isrâ’îl (Children of Israel) Mu’ṫafikāṫ (The overthrown cities of Sodom and Gomorrah) People of Ibrahim People of Ilyas People of Nuh People of Shuaib

Ahl Madyan People of Madyan) Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
Aṣ-ḥāb al-Aykah
("Companions of the Wood")

Qawm Yûnus (People of Jonah) Ya'juj and Ma'juj/Gog and Magog Ahl al-Bayṫ ("People of the Household")

Household of Abraham

Brothers of Yūsuf Daughters of Abraham's nephew Lot (Ritha, Za'ura, et al.) Progeny of Imran Household of Moses Household of Muhammad
Muhammad
ibn Abdullah ibn Abdul-Muttalib ibn Hashim

Daughters of Muhammad Wives of Muhammad

Household of Salih

People of Fir'aun Current Ummah of Islam
Islam
(Ummah of Muhammad)

Aṣ-ḥāb Muḥammad (Companions of Muhammad)

Muhajirun (Emigrants) Anṣār Muslims of Medina
Medina
who helped Muhammad
Muhammad
and his Meccan followers, literally 'Helpers')

People of Mecca

Umm Jamil (wife of Abu Lahab)

Children of Ayyub Dead son of Sulaiman Qabil/Cain (son of Adam) Wali'ah or Wa'ilah/Waala (wife of Nuh) Walihah or Wahilah (wife of Lut) Ya’jūj wa Ma’jūj (Gog and Magog) Yam or Kan'an (son of Nuh)

Implicitly mentioned

Amalek Ahl al-Suffa (People of the Verandah) Banu Nadir Banu Qaynuqa Banu Qurayza Iranian people Umayyad Dynasty Aus & Khazraj People of Quba

Religious groups

Ahl al-dhimmah (Dhimmi) Kâfirûn (Infidels) Zoroastrians Munāfiqūn (Hypocrites) Muslims People of the Book (Ahl al-Kiṫāb)

Naṣārā (Christian(s) or People of the Injil)

Ruhban ( Christian
Christian
monks) Qissis ( Christian
Christian
priest)

Yahūd (Jews)

Ahbār (Jewish scholars) Rabbani/Rabbi

Sabians

Polytheists

Meccan polytheists at the time of Muhammad Mesopotamian polytheists at the time of Abraham
Abraham
and Lot

Locations

Mentioned

Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
Al-Arḍ Al-Mubārakah
("The Land The Blessed")

Al-Arḍ Al-Muqaddasah ("The Land The Holy")

In the Arabian Peninsula
Arabian Peninsula
(excluding Madyan)

Al-Aḥqāf ("The Sandy Plains," or "the Wind-curved Sand-hills")

Iram dhāṫ al-‘Imād (Iram of the Pillars)

Al-Madīnah (formerly Yathrib) ‘Arafāṫ Al-Ḥijr (Hegra) Badr Ḥunayn Makkah (Mecca)

Bakkah Ka‘bah (Kaaba) Maqām Ibrāhīm (Station of Abraham) Safa and Marwah

Saba’ (Sheba)

‘Arim Saba’ (Dam of Sheba)

Rass

Jahannam
Jahannam
(Hell) Jannah
Jannah
(Paradise, literally 'Garden') In Mesopotamia:

Al-Jūdiyy

Munzalanm-Mubārakan ("Place-of-Landing Blessed")

Bābil (Babylon) Qaryaṫ Yūnus ("Township of Jonah," that is Nineveh)

Door of Hittah Madyan (Midian) Majma' al-Bahrain Miṣr (Mainland Egypt) Salsabîl (A river in Paradise) Sinai Region or Tīh Desert

Al-Wād Al-Muqaddas Ṭuwan (The Holy Valley of Tuwa)

Al-Wādil-Ayman (The valley on the 'righthand' side of the Valley of Tuwa and Mount Sinai)

Mount Sinai
Mount Sinai
or Mount Tabor

Implied

Antioch

Antakya

Arabia Ayla Barrier of Dhul-Qarnayn Bayt al-Muqaddas
Bayt al-Muqaddas
& 'Ariha Bilād ar-Rāfidayn (Mesopotamia) Canaan Cave of Seven Sleepers Dār al-Nadwa Al-Ḥijāz (literally "The Barrier")

Black Stone
Black Stone
(Al-Ḥajar al-Aswad) & Al-Hijr of Isma'il Cave of Hira
Hira
& Ghar al-Thawr (Cave of the Bull) Ta'if

Hudaybiyyah Jordan River Nile
Nile
River Palestine River Paradise
Paradise
of Shaddad

Religious locations

Bay'a (Church) Mihrab Monastery Masjid (Mosque, literally "Place of Prostration")

Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
Al-Mash‘ar Al-Ḥarām
("The Monument the Sacred") Al-Masjid Al-Aqṣā (Al-Aqsa Mosque, literally "The Place-of-Prostration The Farthest") Al-Masjid Al-Ḥarām (The Sacred Mosque
Mosque
of Mecca) Masjid al-Dirar A Mosque
Mosque
in the area of Medina, possibly:

Masjid Qubâ’ (Quba Mosque) The Prophet's Mosque

Salat (Synagogue)

Plant
Plant
matter

Fruits

Ḥabb dhul-‘aṣf (Corn of the husk) Rummān (Pomegranate) Ṫīn (Fig) Ukul khamṭ (Bitter fruit or food of Sheba) Zayṫūn (Olive) In Paradise

Forbidden fruit of Adam

Bushes, trees or plants

Plants of Sheba

Athl (Tamarisk) Sidr (lote-tree)

Līnah (Tender palm tree) Nakhl (date palm) Rayḥān (Scented plant) Sidraṫ al-Munṫahā Zaqqūm

Texts

Al-Injîl (The Gospel
Gospel
of Jesus) Al-Qur’ân (The Book of Muhammad) Ṣuḥuf-i Ibrâhîm (Scroll(s) of Abraham) Aṫ-Ṫawrâṫ (The Torah)

Ṣuḥuf-i-Mûsâ (Scroll(s) of Moses) Tablets of Stone

Az-Zabûr (The Psalms
Psalms
of David) Umm al-Kiṫâb ("Mother of the Book(s)")

Objects of people or beings

Heavenly Food of Christian
Christian
Apostles Noah's Ark Staff of Musa Ṫābūṫ as-Sakīnah (Casket of Shekhinah) Throne of Bilqis Trumpet of Israfil

Mentioned idols (cult images)

'Ansāb Idols of Israelites:

Baal The ‘ijl (golden calf statue) of Israelites

Idols of Noah's people:

Nasr Suwā‘ Wadd Yaghūth Ya‘ūq

Idols of Quraysh:

Al-Lāṫ Al-‘Uzzá Manāṫ

Jibṫ and Ṭâghûṫ

Celestial bodies

Maṣābīḥ (literally 'lamps'):

Al-Qamar (The Moon) Kawâkib (Planets)

Al-Arḍ (The Earth)

Nujūm (Stars)

Ash-Shams (The Sun)

Liquids

Mā’ ( Water
Water
or fluid)

Nahr (River) Yamm ( River
River
or sea)

Sharâb (Drink)

Events

Battle of al-Aḥzāb ("the Confederates") Battle of Badr Battle of Hunayn Battle of Khaybar Battle of Tabouk Battle of Uhud Conquest of Mecca Incident of Ifk Laylat al-Mabit Mubahala Sayl al-‘Arim
Sayl al-‘Arim
(Flood of the Great Dam of Marib
Marib
in Sheba) The Farewell Pilgrimage
Farewell Pilgrimage
(Hujja al-Wada') Treaty of Hudaybiyyah Umrah al-Qaza Yawm al-Dār

Implied

Event of Ghadir Khumm

Note: The names are sorted alphabetically. Standard form: Islamic name / Biblical name (title or relationship)

v t e

Islamic holidays
Islamic holidays
and observances

The two Eids

Eid al-Fitr Eid al-Adha

Other holidays and observances

Day of Arafah Day of Ashura Islamic New Year Arba'een1 Mawlid Lailat al Miraj Mid-Sha'ban Ramadan Laylat al-Qadr Eid al-Ghadir1 Mubahala1 Promised Messiah
Messiah
Day2 Promised Reformer Day2 Caliphate
Caliphate
Day2

1 Shia
Shia
Muslim
Muslim
only 2 Ahmadi Muslim
Muslim
only

Coordinates: 22°49′30″N 39°04′30″E / 22.82500°N 39.07500°E /

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