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The SuperCat Fast Ferry Corporation, commonly known as SuperCat, was a shipping company that operated a fleet of High Speed Catamarans
Catamarans
(HSC) in the Philippines. It is now part of 2GO Travel, subsidiary brand of the 2GO Group.[1] Supercat was the sister company of SuperFerry
SuperFerry
and Cebu
Cebu
Ferries. Supercat operated 7 vessels in 7 ports around the Philippines.

Contents

1 Brief history 2 Destinations [6]

2.1 Current Destinations 2.2 Active Routes [6]

3 Fleet

3.1 Vessels

3.1.1 St. Nuriel (formerly Supercat 22) 3.1.2 St. Uriel (formerly SuperCat 23) 3.1.3 St. Sealthiel (formerly SuperCat 25) 3.1.4 St. Emmanuel (formerly SuperCat 26) 3.1.5 St. Jhudiel (formerly SuperCat 30) 3.1.6 St. Braquiel (formerly SuperCat 32) 3.1.7 St. Benedict (formerly SuperCat 36) 3.1.8 St. Dominic (formerly SuperCat 38) 3.1.9 St. Camael and St. Sariel

3.2 Former vessels

4 Trivia 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Brief history[edit]

Interior of SuperCat 32, one of the newer ships in the fleet, bound for Cebu
Cebu
City

Batangas
Batangas
- Calapan
Calapan
route is one of the most important shipping routes in the Philippines. During the early 1990s, the route was dominated by a single large shipping company.[citation needed] Travelling during those days could take up to 3 hours and be uncomfortable. In 1994, Rodolfo G. Valencia, then Governor of Oriental Mindoro, invited the Aboitiz group to ply the route. His intention was to bring a more convenient and faster alternative to Mindoro. Under the management of Universal Aboitiz Inc., M/V SuperCat 1, their pioneer vessel, traveled between Batangas
Batangas
and Calapan
Calapan
in only 45 minutes.[citation needed] SuperCat added routes throughout the Visayas
Visayas
Region. High Speed Crafts became popular in the Philippines.[citation needed] In 1997, Sea Angels (owned by Negros Navigation) merged with Universal Aboitiz and Hong Kong Park View Holdings to form the Philippine Fast Ferry Corporation.[2] SuperCat also acquired the 2 vessels of Waterjet Shipping Corporation (owned by Waterjet Netherlands Antilles). They renamed it as SuperCat 17 (former Waterjet 1, currently FastCat Ryde) and Supercat 18 (former Waterjet 2, currently FastCat Shanklin).[3] The merger was eventually dissolved in 2002 and SuperCat became solely owned by Aboitiz. The abolition of the WG&A merger then soon unraveled. SuperCat sacrificed some of its vessels and their corresponding routes in order to sustain its fast craft operations. SuperCat also downsized from 200 to just 100 employees.[2] From the 1990s to early 2000s, all SuperCat vessels were waterjet-propelled. Due to economic problems, Aboitiz was forced sell ships reducing an original fleet of fourteen down to just seven.[2][4] To cope with the soaring fuel prices, SuperCat started replacing their previous fleet with more fuel-efficient vessels. At present, all jet-powered SuperCat HSC vessels were replaced by more fuel efficient vessels using a simple propulsion syst[5] Destinations [6][edit] Current Destinations[edit]

A Supercat Ticket Booth in Batangas
Batangas
Port

A Supercat Ticket Booth in Calapan
Calapan
Port

Supercat's Original Route ( Batangas
Batangas
- Calapan)

Batangas
Batangas
City, Batangas Bacolod City, Negros Occidental Calapan
Calapan
City, Oriental Mindoro Cebu
Cebu
City, Cebu Iloilo
Iloilo
City, Iloilo Ormoc City, Leyte Tagbilaran City, Bohol

Active Routes [6][edit]

Batangas
Batangas
- Calapan
Calapan
v v. (1 hour 10 minutes) Bacolod - Iloilo
Iloilo
v.v. (1 hour) Cebu
Cebu
- Ormoc v v. (2 hours and 20 minutes) Cebu
Cebu
- Tagbilaran v v. (1 hour 45 minutes) Iloilo
Iloilo
- Bacolod v v. (1 hour 15 minutes)

Fleet[edit] The Supercat fleet was mainly composed of high-speed catamarans, but they also owned monohulled vessels.[7]

Supercat 22 docked at International Port of Batangas, Philippines

The bridge of a Supercat vessel

Evacuation Plan

Supercat Safety Video [8]

Supercat 23 cruising along Batangas
Batangas
Seas

Supercat 25 docked at Calapan
Calapan
Pier, Philippines

Supercat 32 docked at Tagbilaran Port, Philippines

Supercat 30 Aerial Shot

Supercat 32 passing under Marcelo Fernan Bridge in Cebu

Vessels[edit] St. Nuriel (formerly Supercat 22)[edit] St. Nuriel used to be SuperCat 22 M/V Mt. Samat Ferry 3, which was operated by defunct Philippine fast ferry company, Mt. Samat. The Supercat 22 was built by FBMA Marine Inc. (an Aboitiz Company) in Balamban, Cebu. This vessel uses a simple propulsion system, and is very fuel efficient. In July 2010, she was added a second deck. She is currently serving the Batangas
Batangas
- Calapan
Calapan
route. St. Uriel (formerly SuperCat 23)[edit] St. Uriel was the only high speed monohull vessel in the Supercat fleet. She uses a simple propulsion system and her fuel is efficient. She also offers an open deck accommodation at a more affordable price. She is currently in regular service on Batangas
Batangas
- Calapan
Calapan
route. St. Sealthiel (formerly SuperCat 25)[edit] St. Sealthiel used to be SuperCat 25 & M/V Mt. Samat Ferry 5, which was operated by defunct Philippine fast ferry company, Mt. Samat. She is a sister ship of Supercat 22 and was also built by FBMA Marine Inc. (an Aboitiz Company) in Balamban, Cebu. Similarly this vessel uses a simple propulsion system, and is very fuel efficient. She was renamed as M/V Smart in Korea, before ending up with Supercat Fast Ferry Corp. She is serving the Batangas
Batangas
- Calapan
Calapan
route. St. Emmanuel (formerly SuperCat 26)[edit] SuperCat 26 used to be SeaCat from Australia, traveling Perth to Rottnest Island. She has twin Caterpillar C32 engines and can cruise up to 28 knots. She's 25m in length. She is serving the Bacolod-Iloilo route in the Western Visayas
Visayas
region of the Philippines. St. Jhudiel (formerly SuperCat 30)[edit] St. Jhudiel used to be SuperCat 30, one of Elbe City Jet's catamaran. She was named Hanseblitz from 1996–2001 and was reconfigured and elevated its Captain's bridge at Abeking & Rasmussen, and later on acquired by Transtejo in Lisboa,Portugal renamed Bairro Alto until early 2008. She has two decks. The upper deck offers business class accommodation. This vessel was built by Lindstol Skips, in Risor Norway. Unlike the other Supercat vessels, this vessel is equipped with controllable pitch propellers as its propulsion system. Supercat 32 is her sister ship. She is serving the Cebu
Cebu
- Ormoc - Cebu
Cebu
and Cebu - Tagbilaran - Cebu
Cebu
Route. St. Braquiel (formerly SuperCat 32)[edit] St. Braquiel used to be SuperCat 32, one of Elbe City Jet's catamaran. She was named Hansepfeil from 1996–2002 and was reconfigured and elevated its Captain's bridge at Abeking & Rasmussen, and later on acquired by Transtejo in Lisboa,Portugal renamed Parque das Nacoes until early 2008. She has two decks. The upper deck offers business class accommodation. This vessel was built by Lindstol Skips, in Risor Norway. Unlike the other Supercat vessels, this vessel is equipped with controllable pitch propellers as its propulsion system. Supercat 30 is her sister ship. She is serving the Cebu
Cebu
- Tagbilaran - Cebu route. St. Benedict (formerly SuperCat 36)[edit] St. Benedict, formerly known as SuperCat 36 and Blue Fin, is one of three Sydney JetCats
Sydney JetCats
purchased in 1990 for the Manly service to replace hydrofoils. She operated from Manly to Circular Quay from 1990 until 2008 before being sold to Supercat.[9][10] She uses a KAMEWA waterjet-propulsion and her maximum service speed can reach up to 31 knots.[11] St. Dominic (formerly SuperCat 38)[edit]

Supercat 38 docking at Tagbilaran Port, Philippines

St. Dominic, formerly known as SuperCat 38 and Sir David Martin, is one of three Sydney JetCats
Sydney JetCats
purchased for the Manly service to replace hydrofoils. She operated from Manly to Circular Quay from 1990 until 2008 before being sold to Supercat.[9] She uses a KAMEWA waterjet-propulsion and her maximum service speed can reach up to 31 knots.[11] St. Camael and St. Sariel[edit] On June 2017, Austal Philippines
Philippines
delivered the first of two 30-meter catamarans to SuperCat Fast Ferry Corporation, MV St. Camael. Each of the high speed ferries can carry up to 300 passengers, and can cruise at 25 knots[12]. On July 2017, St. Camael's sister ship, MV St. Sariel, was also delivered[13]. St. Camael commenced operations on the Cebu-Ormoc route, while St. Sariel serves the Cebu-Tagbilaran route. Former vessels[edit]

Formerly Supercat 5 and Supercat 7, now in Croatia

Supercat 7 in Supercat's Altered Original Livery. The Livery was partially modified to reflect the Sea Angels Merger

Former Supercat Vessels

Supercat 1 (sank-off en route to Calapan
Calapan
City, Mindoro) Supercat - I (sold to Emeraude Lines renamed as NORMANDIE EXPRESS, later renamed as Moorea Express)[14] Supercat 2 (sold to Korean Shipping Company KOREA EXPRESS FERRY CO.,Ltd, renamed as Korea Express) Supercat 3 (sold to Croatian Shipping Company Jadrolinija, renamed as Karolina [15]) Supercat 5 (sold to Croatian Shipping Company Jadrolinija, renamed as Judita[15]) Supercat 6 (sold to Moreton Bay Whale Watching, sold to Seo Kyung Korea renamed as Gold Coast) Supercat 7 (sold to Croatian Shipping Company Jadrolinija, renamed as Novalja[15]) Supercat 8 (sold to Croatian Shipping Company Jadrolinija, renamed as Dubravka[15]) Supercat 9 (sold to Croatian Shipping Company, renamed as Bisovo) Supercat 10 (sold to Korean Shipping Company WONDERFUL ISLAND CO., renamed as Mosulpo 1 (모슬포1호)) Supercat 11: St. Raphael (sold to Italian Shipping Company Ustica Lines, renamed as Federica M) Supercat 12: St. Gabriel (sold to Italian Shipping Company Ustica Lines, renamed as Gabrielle M) Supercat 17 (sold to Wightlink
Wightlink
for use between Portsmouth
Portsmouth
and Ryde,[16] Renamed as FastCat-Ryde. Sold to Alien Shipping, renamed as Sochi-1) Supercat 18 (sold to Wightlink
Wightlink
for use between Portsmouth
Portsmouth
and Ryde,[17] Renamed as FastCat-Shanklin. Sold to Alien Shipping, renamed as Sochi-2) Supercat 20 (sold to South African Shipping Company FakoShip, renamed as Endurance) Supercat 21 (returned to her lessor [5]) Supercat 2001/Tricat 50 (sold, renamed as SEA POWER 1) Supercat 2002 (sold to a Dutch Shipping Company, renamed as Tiger)

Trivia[edit]

Supercat 6, smallest Supercat vessel

Supercat 3

Supercat 2001 (formerly TriCat 50)

Supercats in Philippine Flag Livery

In September 1994, M/V SuperCat 1 sank near Verde Island. There were no casualties. All passengers were rescued by another RORO vessel. There were speculations that the vessel was sabotaged. It was not proven though. SuperCat 6 was the smallest SuperCat vessel In commemoration of the Philippine Independence Centennial, SuperCat repainted some of its vessels with a "Philippine Flag Livery"[dead link]. TriCat 50 was renamed as SuperCat 2001. SuperCat had already owned three (3) mono hull fast crafts (namely SC 20, 21 & 23) in its history. The brand "SuperCat" was derived from two words, "SUPER" and "CATamaran" Sharon Cuneta filmed SuperCat's TV Ad in both Batangas
Batangas
City and Calapan
Calapan
City. The Ad was only advertised on board and through local cable networks TV Ad in Roxas, Oriental Mindoro
Oriental Mindoro
and Iloilo
Iloilo
City. SuperCat used to have its own exclusive terminal and docking area in Calapan. This was built after the loss of SuperCat 1 where sabotage was suspected. The terminal was eventually demolished after a bigger and better public terminal was constructed in 2009. SuperCat was sued for mandating an additional terminal fee on top of the fare in Calapan, for use of their newly constructed exclusive terminal. SuperCat was then forced to remove the terminal fee. The catamaran Judita, formerly SuperCat 5, is now labeled as the "Pope's Catamaran". Pope John Paul II rode Judita from Omišalj to Rijeka in his visit to Croatia

See also[edit]

SuperFerry Montenegro Lines Cebu
Cebu
Ferries Negros Navigation Roble Shipping Inc. List of shipping companies in the Philippines

References[edit]

^ SuperCat - SuperFerry
SuperFerry
Travel and Leisure - About Us ^ a b c An assessment of Year One of the Aquino administration (30 June 2011), philippinebusiness.com.ph (archiveed from the original on 2011-07-22). ^ Wightlink
Wightlink
Ferry Postcards & Photographs ^ SuperCat attacks Philippine ferry standards (May 1, 2005), allbusiness.com (archived from the original on 2008-03-19), ^ a b SuperCat buys new vessel for $1.7M (October 17, 2007), supercat.com.ph. (archived from the original on 2009-03-19). ^ a b SuperCat - SuperFerry
SuperFerry
Travel and Leisure - Destinations ^ SuperCat - SuperFerry
SuperFerry
Travel and Leisure - Our Fleet ^ Supercat 22 Safety Video - YouTube ^ a b Manly Jet Cat Sea Eagle living in Kazakhstan Yacht & Boat 29 June 2011 ^ Blue Fin / SuperCat 36 Ferries of Sydney ^ a b Jet Car Withdrawal and Manly Fast Ferry Commencement NSW Ministry of Transport ^ "Passenger Express 30 Austal: Philippines". philippines.austal.com. Retrieved 2017-07-11.  ^ "AUSTAL DELIVERS SECOND HIGH SPEED PASSENGER FERRY TO 2GO PHILIPPINES Austal: Corporate". www.austal.com. Retrieved 2017-08-25.  ^ https://archive.is/20120905224448/http://www.faktaomfartyg.nu/oregrund_1988.htm ^ a b c d Jadrolinija
Jadrolinija
- Page 6: Fast Ferries ^ FastCat- Ryde
Ryde
- Wightlink
Wightlink
- Ferry Postcards & Photographs ^ Wightlink
Wightlink
Ferry Postcards & Photographs

External links[edit]

Aboitiz Transport sale: hard decision after marking 100 yrs (archived from the original on 2009-06-26) http://www.superca

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