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The Info List - Steve DeBerg


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Steven Leroy "Steve" DeBerg (born January 19, 1954) is a retired American football
American football
player, a quarterback in the National Football League for 21 years. Although large portions of his career were spent as a backup, DeBerg ultimately accumulated some impressive NFL statistics, particularly during the early 1990s, when he was the starting QB for the Kansas City Chiefs. Deberg played for the San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
(1978–1980), Denver Broncos (1981–1983), Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
(1984–1987, 1992, 1993), Kansas City Chiefs
Kansas City Chiefs
(1988–1991), Miami Dolphins
Miami Dolphins
(1993), and Atlanta Falcons (1998).

Contents

1 Early years 2 Playing career

2.1 Kansas City Chiefs

3 Personal life 4 References 5 External links

Early years[edit] DeBerg is an alumnus of Savanna High School
Savanna High School
in Anaheim, California. He was the starting quarterback and also excelled in the pole vault.[1] He played college football at Fullerton College
Fullerton College
in Fullerton. He was the starting quarterback during the 1972 and 1973 seasons. As a sophomore in 1973, he led his team to a South Coast Conference title with a 5-0 record. In the postseason, he defeated San Diego City College 24-0, but lost in the State Semifinals 20-29 against Los Angeles City College. He would end the season with an overall record of 10-1-0 and received JC All-American honors.[2] In 1974, he transferred to San José State University. In 1976, he became the starter at quarterback, leading his team to a Pacific Coast Athletic Association (Big West Conference) title, was named the PCAA offensive player of the year, set nine school records while completing 141 of 262 attempts for 2,084 yards, 19 touchdowns and 6 interceptions. In 1993, he was inducted into the California Community Colleges Football Coaches Association Hall of Fame. In 2001, he was inducted into the San Jose State University Ring of Honor and Sports Hall of Fame. Playing career[edit] DeBerg was selected by the Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
in the tenth round (275th overall) of the 1977 NFL draft, but was waived before the start of the season after not being able to displace fellow rookie quarterback Glenn Carano. On September 14, he was signed to the San Francisco 49ers' taxi squad. Head coach
Head coach
Bill Walsh took over the team, and in 1979, DeBerg became the first quarterback to implement Walsh's "West Coast Offense", leading the NFL in passing completions and attempts. However, when Walsh drafted Joe Montana
Joe Montana
from Notre Dame in the third round of the 1979 NFL draft, DeBerg was relegated to a backup role midway through the 1980 season. During his only full season as a starter, DeBerg lead the NFL in completions (347), pass attempts (578), and ranked 5th in the league in passing yards (3,652), throwing 17 touchdowns against 21 interceptions. DeBerg had his first 300-yard passing game in his sixth start against Seattle, completing a season high 31 of 40 passes for 306 yards with one touchdown and one interception. Later in the season, he posted his first 100.0 passer rating as a starter, one of two 49ers' wins all year, against his future team Tampa Bay, finishing the contest with an efficient 22 completions in 30 pass attempts (season high 73.3% completion rate) with one touchdown and zero interceptions. The following season in 1980 although the team was improving (San Francisco won just 2 games in 1979, they won 6 in 1980, 4 of them in games started by DeBerg) he completed 186 of 321 passes for 1,998 yards with 12 touchdowns but 17 interceptions. DeBerg started the 1980 campaign strong, winning his first 3 starts and twice completing over 70% of his pass attempts. Turnovers became an issue however as the team started struggling, the low light being a 5 interception game in a lopsided loss vs Dallas on 10/12/80. ( Full season statistics courtesy of Pro Football Reference.com, individual game statistics courtesy of NFL.com). He was traded to Denver Broncos
Denver Broncos
on August 31, 1981, in exchange for a 1983 fourth round draft pick (#87 Chuck Nelson), reuniting with Dan Reeves who coached him during his short time with the Cowboys. Similar events unfolded again and again over the next decade: He was not only with the 49ers when they drafted Joe Montana
Joe Montana
in the third round in 1979, but also with the Broncos when John Elway
John Elway
was drafted first overall in 1983. During his three seasons in Denver DeBerg ultimately backed up both Craig Morton and Elway, appearing in 33 games with 11 starts. DeBerg was 4-1 as a starter for the 1983 Broncos subbing for a rookie Elway, helping in leading the team to the postseason. On April 24, 1984, he was traded to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
in exchange for a fourth round pick (#89 Randy Robbins), and a 1985 conditional pick that ended up being a second round selection (#36-Richard Byrd).[3] He arrived at the club at a time when both Steve Young
Steve Young
and Vinny Testaverde (1987) were drafted.[4] On March 31, 1988, the Buccaneers traded him to the Kansas City Chiefs
Kansas City Chiefs
in exchange for safety Mark Robinson, a fourth round (#86-John Bruhin) and an eighth round pick (#198-Anthony Simpson).[5] DeBerg was the central starter for the 1984 Tampa Bay Bucs, who posted one of the league's more productive offensive attacks with him as the starting QB. The 1984 Bucs ranked 10th in the league in total offensive yards and 8th in passing yards. DeBerg appeared in all 16 games, starting 13, winning 5 of the team's 6 wins on the year. DeBerg passed for 3,554 yards (2nd best of career) with 308 completions in 509 attempts (both second best of his career) along with 19 touchdowns against 18 interceptions. DeBerg finished high on the NFL Leaderboards for the season in attempts (4th), completions (4th), passing yards (7th), touchdown passes (9th), and passing yards per game (8th). The Bucs earned their first win of the season with DeBerg coming off the bench, a 21-17 win over Detroit on 9/16/84 that saw him complete 18 of 27 passes (66.7%) for 195 yards with two touchdowns and no interceptions. It was one of four games on the season in which DeBerg's Passer Rating topped 100 (10/07 vs Minnesota, 10/14 vs Detroit, 12/16 vs NY Jets). DeBerg never passed for fewer than 191 yards in any start that year and topped the 200 yard mark in 10 of 13 starts. His season high 322 passing yards performance came on 11/25/84 in 34-33 shoot-out loss vs LA Rams, just one week after an impressive performance, again in a narrow loss, against his old team San Francisco (26 completions in 41 attempts for 316 yards, 2 touchdowns & 2 interceptions). Narrow losses would be the norm, 6 of the team's 8 losses with DeBerg as a starter came by 7 points or less, as did 3 of their 6 wins that came with DeBerg as the leading passer (5 starts, one relief appearance). Tampa's won-lost record regressed the following year but DeBerg still started 11 games (playing in all 16) and ranking 10th in the league in touchdown passes, finishing the campaign completing 197 of 370 passes for 2,488 yards with 19 touchdowns against 18 interceptions. After starting only two games in 1986 DeBerg was again Tampa's leading passer in his final season there in 1987. Appearing in 12 games with 8 starts DeBerg completed 159 of 275 passes for 1,891 yards with 14 touchdowns and only 7 interceptions, his lowest mark up to this point in season in which he started at least 6 games. DeBerg finished 8th in the league in Passer Rating (85.8), his first season ranked in the year end Top 10 for that category. He also finished in the league Top 10 for completion rate (57.8%), one of 6 times he ranked in the year end Top 10 in that category (1979, 1982, 1984, 1987, 1989, 1990). DeBerg established a career-high with 5 touchdown passes in an opening day win vs Atlanta on 9/13/87, a game in which he completed 24 of 34 pass attempts (season high 70.4% completion rate) for 333 yards. In a narrow 27-26 loss vs the 12-3 Chicago Bears and their league leading defense on 9/20/87 Deberg kept Tampa competitive passing for 249 yards with 2 touchdowns and no turnovers despite taking a physical pounding (career high 7 sacks). Another highlight was leading Tampa to 28 points vs LA Rams on 11/08/87, passing for 303 yards and 3 touchdowns and no interceptions, his 2nd game of the year with a Passer Rating over 100. (Season statistics courtesy of Pro Football Reference.com & individual game statistics courtesy of NFL.com). Although he is remembered as a journeyman quarterback, DeBerg passed for over 34,000 career yards, and ranks in the top 20 all-time for attempts, completions, and yards passing. His best years were with the Chiefs, during which he led the team to two playoff berths and had his best year in 1990 with a 96.3 quarterback rating, passing for 3,444 yards, 23 touchdowns and only 4 interceptions, with 3 of those interceptions coming in one game. Kansas City Chiefs[edit] In DeBerg's first campaign in KC, he appeared in 13 games with 11 starts and passed for 2,935 yards with 16 touchdowns & 16 interceptions, completing 224 of 414 passes. He managed to beat his old team Denver on 9/18/88 with one of his better games of the year, throwing 259 yards and 2 touchdowns with no interceptions and 100.2 Passer Rating. His best game came vs NYJ on 12/04/88 when posted a season high 122.8 Passer Rating, completing 16 of 25 passes for 267 yards and 3 touchdowns against one interception in a 38-34 win. Turnover issues again caused him to temporarily lose his starting job in 1989 as he tossed 8 interceptions in the team's first 3 games, including 5 in one game vs San Diego on 9/24/89. After sitting for two weeks DeBerg briefly returned to the playing field, then sat for 2 weeks, before finishing the season starting the team's final 6 games. Among highlights was a 338-yard, one touchdown, 2 interception performance vs PGH in a 23-17 loss on 10/29/89, a 239-yard, 2 touchdown, one interception performance with a 102.8 Passer Rating in a win vs Miami on 12/03/89 which was followed one week later by a 15 completion in 19 pass attempts effort for 203 yards, 2 touchdowns and zero interceptions in a win vs 10 win Green Bay Packers. DeBerg finished the 1989 season with 2,529 yards passing, completing 196 of 324 passes (60.5% completion rate), with 11 touchdowns vs 16 interceptions. (Season Statistics Courtesy of Pro Football Reference.com & Individual Games Statistics Courtesy of NFL.com) The 1990 season would be DeBerg's finest, his third in row in Kansas City. His 3,444 yards were his third best single season total of his career (7th in the league), his 96.3 passer rating a career-high (3rd in the league), while also managing Top 10 finishes for Average Yards Per Pass Attempt at 7.8 (4th in league, his second straight season in the Top 5 in this category), 8th in the league in passing yards per game, 5th in the league in Average Yards Per Pass Completion (previous best rank was 9th in 1988), his 23 touchdown passes ranked 6th (one of four seasons he ranked in the year end Top 10 in this category), and lead the league with a 0.9 Interception
Interception
Per4centage that included a career-high and team record 223 passes without an interception at one stretch, one of three seasons in which DeBerg ranked in the year-end top 10 in this category (1979, 1987). DeBerg posted a career-high 395 yards passing against his former team Denver on September 17, 1990. He posted another 300 passing game in a blowout win vs New England on 12/02 1990, finishing with 331 yards, 2 touchdowns, no interceptions, and a season high 145.4 Passer Rating, one of a career-high 9 games in which DeBerg's Passer Rating topped the 100 mark. DeBerg suffered a serious injury to his non throwing hand in a late-season loss vs Houston on December 16, 1990, which required the insertion of a pin into his broken finger to keep it straight. For the final two games and playoffs KC ran their entire offense out of the shotgun formation to protect DeBerg from having the football jammed in his injured hand during the center to quarterback exchange. Despite the change KC won its final two games to clinch just its second playoff appearance in over a decade, with DeBerg completing 44 of 59 passes for 527 yards with two touchdowns and no interceptions. In a 17–16 loss vs Miami in the 1990 AFC Wild Card Game DeBerg overcame his injury to complete 17 of 30 pass attempts for 269 yards with one touchdown and one interception. (Season statistics courtesy of Pro Football Reference.com and individual game statistics courtesy of NFL.com). Throughout his career, he was frequently noted as one of the best play-action pass quarterbacks of all time.[6] Peyton Manning
Peyton Manning
has studied films of DeBerg's play-action technique.[6] During his career, DeBerg also acquired a reputation for playing through particularly gruesome or unique injuries.[citation needed] He played with laryngitis and wore a portable amplifier during regular-season games with San Francisco. He also played with a broken non-throwing hand and an exposed metal pin sticking out of his finger in a Chiefs playoff game in 1990. In 1993, he left a Dolphins game versus the New York Giants battered and bloodied after taking a helmet to the chin, only to return to the game following halftime. Earlier in the season, he started in place of Dan Marino
Dan Marino
in the Thanksgiving game where Leon Lett's blunder resulted in a Dolphins win.[citation needed] He retired after the 1993 season, but briefly returned to the NFL in 1998, at age 44, reuniting with head coach Dan Reeves
Dan Reeves
as a backup with the Atlanta Falcons.[7] On October 25, with Chris Chandler
Chris Chandler
unable to play, Deberg became the oldest quarterback to ever start an NFL game when he led the Falcons against the New York Jets.[6] He also became the oldest player ever included on a Super Bowl
Super Bowl
roster, at the age of 45 years, 12 days, when the Falcons appeared in Super Bowl
Super Bowl
XXXIII, though he did not play. Personal life[edit] He was inducted to the Rebel hall of fame at Savanna High School, for his achievements as a starting quarterback in the NFL, on February 5, 2010, during halftime at a varsity boys basketball game at Savanna High School.[citation needed] DeBerg served as the head coach of the Arena Football League's Indiana Firebirds in 2004 for five games. The team's record during his tenure was 0–5. He later served as an assistant coach with the Tampa Bay Storm. References[edit]

^ "California State Meet Results – 1915 to present". Hank Lawson. Retrieved 2012-12-25.  ^ "ALUMNI STORIES: STEVE DEBERG". Retrieved April 30, 2017.  ^ "Bucs get DeBerg from Broncos". Lakeland Ledger. Florida. wire services. April 25, 1984. p. 1D.  ^ "Rx for Rex?". Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved 2007-01-01.  ^ "Bucs trade Q.B. DeBerg". The Bulletin. Bend, Oregon. UPI. April 1, 1988. p. D3.  ^ a b c Cross, B. Duane. "The long journey: Steve DeBerg's 17-year career was a tale of 'What could have been'". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved July 20, 2010.  ^ Spencer, Sheldon (July 29, 1998). "The (way) back-up QB". Toledo Blade. Ohio. (San Jose Mercury News). p. 23. 

External links[edit]

Steve DeBerg coaching page at ArenaFan Online

Career statistics and player information from NFL.com • Pro-Football-Reference • Databasefootball.com Sports Reference – collegiate statistics – Steve DeBerg

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San Jose State Spartans starting quarterbacks

Roy Zimmerman (1938–1939) Deward Tornell (1940) Allen Hardisty (1941) Jim Jackson (1947) Chuck Hughes (1948) Gene Menges (1948–1950) Lynn Aplanalp (1951–1952) Larry Rice (1953) Benny Pierce (1954) Tony Teresa (1955) Bob Reinhart (1956) Dick Vermeil
Dick Vermeil
(1957) Emmett Lee (1958–1959) Mike Jones (1960) Chon Gallegos (1961) Rand Carter (1962–1963) Ken Berry (1964–1965) Danny Holman (1966–1967) Russ Munson (1968) Ivan Lippi (1969–1970) Gary Tomasso (1970) Dave Ellis (1971) Craig Kimball (1972–1974) Roger Profitt (1975) Steve DeBerg (1976) Ed Luther (1977–1979) Steve Clarkson (1980–1982) Jon Carlson (1983, 1985) Bob Frasco (1984) Doug Allen (1985) Mike Perez (1986–1987) Ken Lutz (1988) Matt Veatch (1989, 1991) Ralph Martini (1989–1990) Jeff Garcia
Jeff Garcia
(1991–1993) Alli Abrew (1994–1995) Brent Evans (1994) Carl Dean (1995–1996) Brian Vye (1997–1998) Dan O'Dell (1997) Chris Kasteler (1997–1999) Marcus Arroyo (1998, 2000–2001) Clint Carlson (2001) Scott Rislov (2002–2003) Dale Rogers (2004) Adam Tafralis
Adam Tafralis
(2004–2007) Myles Eden (2008) Kyle Reed (2008–2009) Sean Flynn (2008) Jordan La Secla (2009–2010) Matt Faulkner (2011) Dasmen Stewart (2011) David Fales
David Fales
(2012–2013) Blake Jurich (2014) Joe Gray (2014–2015) Mitch Ravizza (2014) Kenny Potter (2015–2016) Josh Love (2016–2017)

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Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
1977 NFL draft selections

Tony Dorsett Glenn Carano Tony Hill Val Belcher Guy Brown Andy Frederick Jim Cooper David Stalls Al Cleveland Fred Williams Mark Cantrell Steve DeBerg Don Wardlow Greg Peters

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San Francisco 49ers
San Francisco 49ers
starting quarterbacks

Frankie Albert
Frankie Albert
(1946–1952) Y. A. Tittle
Y. A. Tittle
(1951–1960) Jim Powers (1953) Jim Cason (1954) Earl Morrall
Earl Morrall
(1956) John Brodie
John Brodie
(1957–1973) Lamar McHan (1963) Bob Waters (1963) George Mira
George Mira
(1964–1967) Steve Spurrier
Steve Spurrier
(1967, 1969, 1972–1973, 1975) Joe Reed (1973–1974) Tom Owen (1974–1975) Dennis Morrison (1974) Norm Snead (1974–1975) Jim Plunkett (1976–1977) Scott Bull (1976, 1978) Steve DeBerg (1978–1980) Joe Montana
Joe Montana
(1979–1990) Matt Cavanaugh
Matt Cavanaugh
(1984–1985) Jeff Kemp (1986) Mike Moroski (1986) Steve Young
Steve Young
(1987–1999) Bob Gagliano (1987) Steve Bono
Steve Bono
(1991) Elvis Grbac
Elvis Grbac
(1995–1996) Jim Druckenmiller (1997) Ty Detmer
Ty Detmer
(1998) Steve Stenstrom (1999) Jeff Garcia
Jeff Garcia
(1999–2003) Tim Rattay (2003–2005) Ken Dorsey
Ken Dorsey
(2004–2005) Alex Smith
Alex Smith
(2005–2007, 2009–2012) Cody Pickett
Cody Pickett
(2005) Trent Dilfer
Trent Dilfer
(2007) Shaun Hill
Shaun Hill
(2007–2009) Chris Weinke (2007) J. T. O'Sullivan
J. T. O'Sullivan
(2008) Troy Smith
Troy Smith
(2010) Colin Kaepernick
Colin Kaepernick
(2012–2016) Blaine Gabbert
Blaine Gabbert
(2015–2016) Brian Hoyer
Brian Hoyer
(2017) C. J. Beathard
C. J. Beathard
(2017) Jimmy Garoppolo
Jimmy Garoppolo
(2017–present)

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Denver Broncos
Denver Broncos
starting quarterbacks

Frank Tripucka
Frank Tripucka
(1960–1963) George Herring (1961) George Shaw (1962) Mickey Slaughter (1963–1966) John McCormick (1963, 1965–1966, 1968) Don Breaux (1963) Jacky Lee (1964–1965) Max Choboian (1966) Scotty Glacken (1966) Steve Tensi (1966–1970) Jim LeClair (1966–1967) Marlin Briscoe (1968) Pete Liske (1969–1970) Alan Pastrana
Alan Pastrana
(1970) Don Horn (1971) Steve Ramsey (1971–1972, 1974–1976) Charley Johnson (1972–1975) John Hufnagel (1975) Craig Penrose (1976, 1978) Craig Morton (1977–1982) Norris Weese (1978–1979) Matt Robinson (1980) Steve DeBerg (1981–1983) Mark Herrmann (1982) John Elway
John Elway
(1983–1998) Gary Kubiak
Gary Kubiak
(1983–1984, 1988–1989) Ken Karcher (1987) Tommy Maddox
Tommy Maddox
(1992) Hugh Millen (1994) Bill Musgrave (1996) Bubby Brister (1998) Brian Griese
Brian Griese
(1999–2002) Chris Miller (1999) Gus Frerotte
Gus Frerotte
(2000–2001) Steve Beuerlein (2002–2003) Jake Plummer
Jake Plummer
(2003–2006) Danny Kanell (2003) Jarious Jackson
Jarious Jackson
(2003) Jay Cutler (2006–2008) Kyle Orton
Kyle Orton
(2009–2011) Chris Simms
Chris Simms
(2009) Tim Tebow
Tim Tebow
(2010–2011) Peyton Manning
Peyton Manning
(2012–2015) Brock Osweiler
Brock Osweiler
(2015, 2017) Trevor Siemian
Trevor Siemian
(2016–2017) Paxton Lynch
Paxton Lynch
(2016–present)

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Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
starting quarterbacks

Steve Spurrier
Steve Spurrier
(1976) Parnell Dickinson (1976) Terry Hanratty (1976) Gary Huff (1977) Randy Hedberg (1977) Jeb Blount (1977) Doug Williams (1978–1982) Mike Rae (1978) Mike Boryla (1978) Jack Thompson (1983–1984) Jerry Golsteyn (1983) Steve DeBerg (1984–1987, 1992–1993) Steve Young
Steve Young
(1985–1986) Vinny Testaverde
Vinny Testaverde
(1987–1992) John Reaves (1987) Jim Zorn
Jim Zorn
(1987) Joe Ferguson (1988–1989) Chris Chandler
Chris Chandler
(1990–1991) Jeff Carlson (1991) Craig Erickson (1993–1994) Trent Dilfer
Trent Dilfer
(1994–1999) Shaun King (1999–2000, 2002) Eric Zeier
Eric Zeier
(1999) Brad Johnson (2001–2004) Rob Johnson (2002) Brian Griese
Brian Griese
(2004–2005, 2008) Chris Simms
Chris Simms
(2004–2006) Bruce Gradkowski
Bruce Gradkowski
(2006) Tim Rattay (2006) Jeff Garcia
Jeff Garcia
(2007–2008) Luke McCown
Luke McCown
(2007) Byron Leftwich
Byron Leftwich
(2009) Josh Johnson (2009, 2011) Josh Freeman
Josh Freeman
(2009–2013) Mike Glennon (2013–2014) Josh McCown
Josh McCown
(2014) Jameis Winston
Jameis Winston
(2015–present) Ryan Fitzpatrick
Ryan Fitzpatrick
(2017)

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Dallas Texans / Kansas City Chiefs
Kansas City Chiefs
starting quarterbacks

Cotton Davidson
Cotton Davidson
(1960–1961) Hunter Enis (1960) Randy Duncan (1961) Len Dawson
Len Dawson
(1962–1975) Eddie Wilson (1963) Pete Beathard (1965) Jacky Lee (1968–1969) Mike Livingston (1969–1979) Tony Adams (1975, 1977–1978) Steve Fuller (1979–1982) Bill Kenney (1980–1988) Todd Blackledge (1984–1987) Matt Stevens (1987) Frank Seurer (1987) Doug Hudson (1987) Steve DeBerg (1988–1991) Ron Jaworski
Ron Jaworski
(1989) Steve Pelluer (1989) Mark Vlasic (1991) Dave Krieg (1992–1993) Joe Montana
Joe Montana
(1993–1994) Steve Bono
Steve Bono
(1994–1996) Rich Gannon
Rich Gannon
(1996–1998) Elvis Grbac
Elvis Grbac
(1997–2000) Warren Moon
Warren Moon
(2000) Trent Green
Trent Green
(2001–2006) Damon Huard
Damon Huard
(2006–2008) Brodie Croyle
Brodie Croyle
(2007–2010) Tyler Thigpen
Tyler Thigpen
(2008) Matt Cassel
Matt Cassel
(2009–2012) Tyler Palko (2011) Kyle Orton
Kyle Orton
(2011) Brady Quinn
Brady Quinn
(2012) Alex Smith
Alex Smith
(2013–present) Chase Daniel
Chase Daniel
(2013–2014) Nick Foles
Nick Foles
(2016) Patrick Mahomes II
Patrick Mahomes II
(2017)

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Miami Dolphins
Miami Dolphins
starting quarterbacks

Dick Wood (1966) Rick Norton (1966–1969) George Wilson (1966) John Stofa (1966–1967) Bob Griese
Bob Griese
(1967–1980) George Mira
George Mira
(1971) Earl Morrall
Earl Morrall
(1972–1975) Don Strock (1975–1976, 1978–1981, 1983) David Woodley (1980–1983) Dan Marino
Dan Marino
(1983–1999) Kyle Mackey (1987) Scott Mitchell (1993) Steve DeBerg (1993) Bernie Kosar
Bernie Kosar
(1995) Craig Erickson (1996) Damon Huard
Damon Huard
(1999–2000) Jay Fiedler
Jay Fiedler
(2000–2004) Ray Lucas (2002) Brian Griese
Brian Griese
(2003) A. J. Feeley
A. J. Feeley
(2004) Sage Rosenfels
Sage Rosenfels
(2004–2005) Gus Frerotte
Gus Frerotte
(2005) Joey Harrington (2006) Daunte Culpepper
Daunte Culpepper
(2006) Cleo Lemon
Cleo Lemon
(2006–2007) Trent Green
Trent Green
(2007) John Beck (2007) Chad Pennington
Chad Pennington
(2008–2010) Chad Henne
Chad Henne
(2009–2011) Tyler Thigpen
Tyler Thigpen
(2010) Matt Moore (2011, 2016–2017) Ryan Tannehill
Ryan Tannehill
(2012–2016) Jay Cutler (2017–present)

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Atlanta Falcons
Atlanta Falcons
starting quarterbacks

Randy Johnson (1966–1970) Dennis Claridge (1966) Terry Nofsinger (1967) Steve Sloan (1967) Bob Berry (1968–1972) Bruce Lemmerman (1969) Dick Shiner (1971, 1973) Bob Lee (1973–1974) Pat Sullivan (1974–1975) Kim McQuilken (1974–1976) Steve Bartkowski (1975–1985) Scott Hunter (1976–1977) June Jones
June Jones
(1978–1979) Mike Moroski (1983–1984) David Archer (1985–1987) Turk Schonert (1986) Scott Campbell (1987, 1990) Erik Kramer (1987) Jeff Van Raaphorst (1987) Chris Miller (1987–1993) Steve Dils (1988) Hugh Millen (1989–1990) Billy Joe Tolliver
Billy Joe Tolliver
(1991–1993, 1997) Wade Wilson (1992) Bobby Hebert (1993, 1996) Jeff George (1994–1996) Chris Chandler
Chris Chandler
(1997–2001) Tony Graziani (1997–1999) Steve DeBerg (1998) Danny Kanell (1999–2000) Doug Johnson (2000, 2002–2003) Michael Vick
Michael Vick
(2001–2006) Kurt Kittner (2003) Matt Schaub
Matt Schaub
(2004–2005) Joey Harrington (2007) Byron Leftwich
Byron Leftwich
(2007) Chris Redman
Chris Redman
(2007, 2009) Matt Ryan (2008–present)

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Indiana
Indiana
Firebirds

Formerly the Albany Firebirds Founded in 1990 Folded in 2004 Based in Albany, New York
Albany, New York
(1990–2000) and Indianapolis, Indiana (2001–2004)

Franchise

Franchise Seasons Players

Arenas

Knickerbocker Arena/Pepsi Arena Conseco Fieldhouse

Head coaches

Buffington Hohensee Dailey DeBerg Wilpolt

Playoff appearances (11)

1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002

Division championships (6)

1994 1995 1996 1998 1999 2000

ArenaBowl appearances (1)

XIII

Hall of Fame members

Sylvester Bembery Eddie Brown Mike Dailey Fred Gayles Darryl Hammond Mike Hohensee Greg Hopkins Glenn Mazula Reggie Smith Durwood Roquemore

Seasons (15)

2000s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2

.