HOME
The Info List - Stan Van Gundy


--- Advertisement ---



Stanley Alan Van Gundy (born August 26, 1959)[1] is an American professional basketball coach, currently serving as the head coach and president of basketball operations of the National Basketball Association's Detroit Pistons.[2] From 2003 to 2005, he was the head coach of the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
but resigned in 2005 mid-season, turning the job over to Pat Riley. Van Gundy then coached the Orlando Magic
Orlando Magic
for five seasons from 2007 to 2012, leading them to the 2009 NBA Finals. He is the brother of former New York Knicks
New York Knicks
and Houston Rockets
Houston Rockets
coach Jeff Van Gundy.

Contents

1 Playing career 2 Coaching career

2.1 College 2.2 Miami Heat 2.3 Orlando Magic 2.4 Detroit Pistons

3 Personal life 4 Head coaching record

4.1 College 4.2 NBA

5 References

Playing career[edit] Van Gundy was a starting guard at Alhambra High School in Martinez, California in the San Francisco Bay Area. He played basketball for his father, Bill Van Gundy, at SUNY-Brockport, a Division III school, until he graduated in 1981 with a B.A. in English and a B.S. in Physical Education.[3] Coaching career[edit] College[edit] Van Gundy began his coaching career as an assistant coach at the University of Vermont, 1981–83, and was head coach at Castleton State College in Vermont for three seasons from 1983 to 1986.[3] After his first season as Castleton head coach, the NAIA named Van Gundy the District 5 Coach of the Year.[4] Castleton finished 1984–85 the top team in the NAIA's Mayflower Conference and won the NAIA District 5 tournament.[5][6] After serving as an assistant coach at Canisius College in 1987 and Fordham University
Fordham University
in 1988, Van Gundy was named head coach at the University of Lowell. During his four-season tenure at the school, which saw the institution become the University of Massachusetts Lowell, he compiled a record of 54–60 and coached Leo Parent, whom Van Gundy called "the best Division 2 player in the nation."[7] Van Gundy then became an assistant at the University of Wisconsin under Stu Jackson.[3] When Jackson left after 2 years to become general manager of the expansion NBA Vancouver franchise, Van Gundy was promoted to replace him as head coach and given a 5-year contract. Coming off an 18–11 season with future NBA star Michael Finley
Michael Finley
back for his senior year and highly touted recruits coming in, the team went into the season with high expectations, but ended with a disappointing 13–14 record (7–11 and ninth place in the Big 10). Van Gundy was fired at the end of the season and given a buyout for the 4 years remaining on his contract. Van Gundy blamed financial concerns at the school for his firing.[8] The team would go on to hire Dick Bennett from the University of Wisconsin–Green Bay
University of Wisconsin–Green Bay
and he finished his first year with a 17–15 record and NIT appearance despite losing Finley and other key players. Overall, Van Gundy compiled a record of 135–92 (.595) in eight years as a college head coach.[3] Miami Heat[edit]

Van Gundy in 2005.

Van Gundy spent twelve years with the Heat organization, beginning as an assistant coach to Pat Riley
Pat Riley
in 1995. After working as an assistant under Riley, Van Gundy was named head coach when Riley abruptly resigned as coach prior to the 2003–04 season. However, Riley remained as President of the team. Van Gundy took over a team that had won 25 games the previous season. He led them to a 42-win season, in which they won a very high percentage of their late season games and surprised many by advancing to the second round of the 2004 NBA Playoffs, nearly defeating the team with the league's best record, the Indiana Pacers, due to the strong play of rookie Dwyane Wade. During the off-season, Shaquille O'Neal
Shaquille O'Neal
demanded a trade and made Miami the only viable option for the Lakers to make a transaction with. Riley gave up Caron Butler, Lamar Odom, Brian Grant
Brian Grant
and a future first-round draft choice, replacing three of the team's starters, including an Olympian and a future all star, with O'Neal. Van Gundy led the Heat to the best record in the Eastern Conference in the first half of the season, becoming the first Heat coach to coach in the All-Star Game, where he led the East to a victory. The Heat finished the season with 59 wins, earning the best record in the conference. The Heat went on to advance to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals, where they lost to the Detroit Pistons. Injuries played a factor in their defeat, particularly a rib injury to leading scorer Wade during Game 5, which prevented him from playing Game 6 and severely hindered him in Game 7, both Piston wins. During the 2005 off-season, it was widely speculated that Pat Riley was attempting to run Van Gundy out of his coaching job and take over the job himself, now that the team was in a position to contend for the championship.[9] Van Gundy would resign from his position as head coach on December 12, 2005, just 21 games into the season, citing a need to spend more time with his family. Riley replaced him as head coach, and led Miami to their first championship that same season. In Shaquille O'Neal's book, "Shaq Uncut: My Story", O'Neal responded to allegations of being a "coach killer" and that he forced Van Gundy out of Miami by stating: "Stan got fired because Pat (Riley) wanted to take over, not because I wanted him out. I had no control over it — not a smidgen of control. We all kind of knew it was coming because Pat and Stan were always arguing. Pat would come down and tell Stan how to do something and Stan would want to do it his own way, and that was a fine game plan if you wanted to get yourself fired."[10] Though at the time of his resignation Van Gundy asserted he was not being forced out by Riley, he has more recently declined comment on the situation after he accepted a coaching job with the Orlando Magic less than two years later.[11] Riley himself would resign from his coaching duties two years later, following a 15–67 season from the Heat. Orlando Magic[edit] In May 2007, Van Gundy received an offer to replace the fired Rick Carlisle as head coach of the Indiana Pacers. Van Gundy turned down the offer, but began interviewing for other head coaching jobs. He was considered a lead candidate to become head coach of the Orlando Magic and also the Sacramento Kings. However, the Magic hired Billy Donovan. Shortly thereafter, Donovan decided he wanted to back out of the deal and return to the University of Florida. Finally on June 5, 2007, the Magic released Donovan and offered another contract to Van Gundy.[12] ESPN SportsCenter reported that the Miami Heat
Miami Heat
allowed Van Gundy to coach the Magic in exchange for a second-round draft pick in 2007 and the right to swap first-round picks in 2008 or another 2008 second-round draft pick and cash.

Van Gundy coaching the Magic.

In Van Gundy's first season with the Magic, he guided them to a 52-win season, earning the team's first division championship since the 1995–96 season, and the third-best record in the Eastern Conference. Orlando defeated the Toronto Raptors
Toronto Raptors
4–1 in the first round of the playoffs, advancing to the Eastern Semifinals for the first time in twelve seasons. They were later defeated in the Eastern Semifinals by the Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
4–1. Van Gundy and the Magic won 59 games in 2008–09, the second most in franchise history, along with a second consecutive division championship. They defeated the 66–16 Cleveland Cavaliers
Cleveland Cavaliers
in the Eastern Conference Finals in six games to advancing to the NBA Finals, Orlando's first Finals appearance since 1995. After suffering a blowout loss in game 1 against the Los Angeles Lakers, the Magic put up a better effort in game 2, but were defeated in overtime. In game 3, the Magic shot 63% for the game, a Finals record, en route to their first win in a Finals game in franchise history. They went on to lose the next two games as the Lakers won the series in five. Also during the 2008–09 season, a feud developed between Van Gundy and the Phoenix Suns' center, and former Magic/Heat player, Shaquille O'Neal (the two were together when O'Neal played for the Heat and Van Gundy was his coach). After a game between the Suns and Magic, Van Gundy said O'Neal was flopping throughout the night. O'Neal fired back by calling Van Gundy "a master of panic," because Van Gundy was not successful in the playoffs per O'Neal.[13] On January 31, 2010, Van Gundy was named the coach of the Eastern Conference All-Star team for the 2010 NBA All-Star Game, making it the second time he had been given the honor to coach an all-star team. He led the Eastern Conference to victory for the second time.[14] On May 21, 2012, Van Gundy was relieved of his duties as Head Coach, despite making the playoffs in all five seasons as coach.[15] Prior to the firing, Van Gundy had stated that he had knowledge that Dwight Howard wanted him fired. Van Gundy stated that somebody from management had told him, and the team did not want to risk angering Howard, who was able to opt out of his contract the following season.[16] Howard still requested, and was granted, a trade to the Lakers in August 2012. Detroit Pistons[edit] On May 14, 2014, Van Gundy was hired as the new head coach and president of basketball operations of the Detroit Pistons, replacing interim head coach John Loyer.[2] On February 9, 2015, Van Gundy became the 43rd coach in NBA history to win 400 games when the Pistons defeated the Atlanta Hawks
Atlanta Hawks
105–95. He clinched a berth in the 2016 playoffs. Personal life[edit]

This section of a biography of a living person does not include any references or sources. Please help by adding reliable sources. Contentious material about living people that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately. Find sources: "Stan Van Gundy" – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (December 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Van Gundy was born in Indio, California. He grew up as a son of a basketball coach, Bill Van Gundy, the former head coach at Brockport State University in Western New York. His younger brother Jeff Van Gundy has coached two teams in the NBA as well. After Jeff became a member of the NBA on ABC's broadcast team, he was an analyst during the 2009 NBA Finals
2009 NBA Finals
while Stan coached the Orlando Magic. Head coaching record[edit] College[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason

Castleton Spartans (Mayflower Conference) (1983–1986)

1983–84 Castleton 26–2 8–0 1st

1984–85 Castleton 23–7 8–0 1st NAIA First Round

1985–86 Castleton 19–9 4–2

Castleton: 68–18 (.791) 20–2

UMass Lowell River Hawks (New England Collegiate Conference) (1988–1992)

1988–89 UMass Lowell 16–13 9–5

1989–90 UMass Lowell 13–15 7–7

1990–91 UMass Lowell 11–17 5–9

1991–92 UMass Lowell 14–15 7–7

UMass Lowell: 54–60 (.474) 28–28

Wisconsin Badgers (Big Ten Conference) (1994–1995)

1994–95 Wisconsin 13–14 7–11 9th

Wisconsin: 13–14 (.481) 7–11 (.389)

Total: 135–92 (.595)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion         Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion       Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion       Conference tournament champion

NBA[edit]

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

Miami 2003–04 82 42 40 .512 2nd in Atlantic 13 6 7 .462 Lost in Conference Semifinals

Miami 2004–05 82 59 23 .720 1st in Southeast 15 11 4 .733 Lost in Conference Finals

Miami 2005–06 21 11 10 .524 (resigned) — — — — —

Orlando 2007–08 82 52 30 .634 1st in Southeast 10 5 5 .500 Lost in Conference Semifinals

Orlando 2008–09 82 59 23 .720 1st in Southeast 24 13 11 .542 Lost in NBA Finals

Orlando 2009–10 82 59 23 .720 1st in Southeast 14 10 4 .714 Lost in Conference Finals

Orlando 2010–11 82 52 30 .634 2nd in Southeast 6 2 4 .333 Lost in First Round

Orlando 2011–12 66 37 29 .561 3rd in Southeast 5 1 4 .200 Lost in First Round

Detroit 2014–15 82 32 50 .390 5th in Central — — — — Missed playoffs

Detroit 2015–16 82 44 38 .537 3rd in Central 4 0 4 .000 Lost in First Round

Detroit 2016–17 82 37 45 .451 5th in Central — — — — Missed playoffs

Career 825 484 341 .587

91 48 43 .527

References[edit]

^ "Stan Van Gundy". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved May 4, 2014.  ^ a b " Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
Name Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
Head Coach and President of Basketball Operations". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. May 14, 2014. Retrieved May 14, 2014.  ^ a b c d "Stan Van Gundy". NBA.com. Retrieved January 16, 2013.  ^ Wilde, Jason (October 27, 1993). "Van Gundy happy to be top assistant". The Milwaukee Sentinel.  ^ "Monks named no. 1 for NAIA event". Bangor Daily News. February 25, 1985. p. 10.  ^ "1985 Men's Basketball Team". Castleton Spartans. Retrieved May 4, 2014.  ^ Worthy, Lynn (May 8, 2009). " Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
remembers Leo and the gang at Lowell". Lowell Sun. Retrieved May 4, 2014.  ^ "Van Gundy's First Season Proves To Be Last". Chicago Tribune. March 15, 1995. Retrieved January 16, 2013.  ^ "Heat coach Van Gundy resigns; Riley returns". sports.espn.go.com. Retrieved October 23, 2015.  ^ O'Neal, S.; MacMullan, J. (2011). Shaq Uncut: My Story. Grand Central Publishing. ISBN 9781455504428. Retrieved October 23, 2015.  ^ "Orlando Magic: Shaquille O'Neal
Shaquille O'Neal
says blame Pat Riley
Pat Riley
for Stan Van Gundy's Miami exit - tribunedigital-orlandosentinel". articles.orlandosentinel.com. Retrieved October 23, 2015.  ^ "Reports: Donovan Almost Out, Van Gundy Almost In for Magic". NBA.com. Retrieved June 5, 2007.  ^ "Shaq rips Van Gundy for flop comment". Sports.espn.go.com. March 5, 2009. Retrieved January 16, 2013.  ^ "Van Gundy to Serve as East All-Star Coach". Nba.com. January 31, 2010. Retrieved January 16, 2013.  ^ "Van Gundy Relieved of Duties; Smith and Magic Mutually Agree To Part Ways". Nba.com. Retrieved January 16, 2013.  ^ "Orlando Magic's Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
Dwight Howard
Dwight Howard
wants me fired". Espn.go.com. April 6, 2012. Retrieved January 16, 2013. 

v t e

Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
current roster

0 Drummond 1 Jackson 5 Kennard 7 Johnson 8 Ellenson 9 Galloway 14 Smith 20 Buycks 22 Felder (TW) 23 Griffin 24 Moreland 25 Bullock 30 Leuer 33 Ennis 38 Hearn (TW) 41 Nelson 43 Tolliver

Head coach: Van Gundy Assistant coaches: Allen Beyer Hardaway Klask Malone Smith Walters

v t e

Current head coaches of the National Basketball Association

Eastern Conference

Atlantic

Brad Stevens
Brad Stevens
(Boston Celtics) Kenny Atkinson (Brooklyn Nets) Jeff Hornacek
Jeff Hornacek
(New York Knicks) Brett Brown
Brett Brown
(Philadelphia 76ers) Dwane Casey
Dwane Casey
(Toronto Raptors)

Central

Fred Hoiberg
Fred Hoiberg
(Chicago Bulls) Tyronn Lue
Tyronn Lue
(Cleveland Cavaliers) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(Detroit Pistons) Nate McMillan
Nate McMillan
(Indiana Pacers) Joe Prunty (Milwaukee Bucks)

Southeast

Mike Budenholzer
Mike Budenholzer
(Atlanta Hawks) Steve Clifford
Steve Clifford
(Charlotte Hornets) Erik Spoelstra
Erik Spoelstra
(Miami Heat) Frank Vogel
Frank Vogel
(Orlando Magic) Scott Brooks
Scott Brooks
(Washington Wizards)

Western Conference

Northwest

Michael Malone (Denver Nuggets) Tom Thibodeau
Tom Thibodeau
(Minnesota Timberwolves) Billy Donovan
Billy Donovan
(Oklahoma City Thunder) Terry Stotts
Terry Stotts
(Portland Trail Blazers) Quin Snyder
Quin Snyder
(Utah Jazz)

Pacific

Steve Kerr
Steve Kerr
(Golden State Warriors) Doc Rivers
Doc Rivers
(Los Angeles Clippers) Luke Walton
Luke Walton
(Los Angeles Lakers) Jay Triano
Jay Triano
(Phoenix Suns) Dave Joerger
Dave Joerger
(Sacramento Kings)

Southwest

Rick Carlisle
Rick Carlisle
(Dallas Mavericks) Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
(Houston Rockets) J. B. Bickerstaff (Memphis Grizzlies) Alvin Gentry
Alvin Gentry
(New Orleans Pelicans) Gregg Popovich
Gregg Popovich
(San Antonio Spurs)

v t e

Current heads of basketball operations in the National Basketball Association

Eastern Conference

Atlantic

Danny Ainge
Danny Ainge
(Boston Celtics) Sean Marks
Sean Marks
(Brooklyn Nets) Scott Perry (New York Knicks) Bryan Colangelo
Bryan Colangelo
(Philadelphia 76ers) Masai Ujiri
Masai Ujiri
(Toronto Raptors)

Central

John Paxson (Chicago Bulls) Koby Altman (Cleveland Cavaliers) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(Detroit Pistons) Kevin Pritchard
Kevin Pritchard
(Indiana Pacers) Jon Horst (Milwaukee Bucks)

Southeast

Travis Schlenk (Atlanta Hawks) Buzz Peterson
Buzz Peterson
(interim) (Charlotte Hornets) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(Miami Heat) John Hammond (Orlando Magic) Ernie Grunfeld
Ernie Grunfeld
(Washington Wizards)

Western Conference

Northwest

Tim Connelly & Artūras Karnišovas (Denver Nuggets) Tom Thibodeau
Tom Thibodeau
(Minnesota Timberwolves) Sam Presti (Oklahoma City Thunder) Neil Olshey (Portland Trail Blazers) Dennis Lindsey (Utah Jazz)

Pacific

Bob Myers
Bob Myers
(Golden State Warriors) Michael Winger (Los Angeles Clippers) Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson
& Rob Pelinka
Rob Pelinka
(Los Angeles Lakers) Ryan McDonough (Phoenix Suns) Vlade Divac
Vlade Divac
(Sacramento Kings)

Southwest

Donnie Nelson
Donnie Nelson
(Dallas Mavericks) Daryl Morey
Daryl Morey
(Houston Rockets) Chris Wallace (Memphis Grizzlies) Dell Demps (New Orleans Pelicans) R. C. Buford (San Antonio Spurs)

Note: Those listed here either hold the title President of Basketball Operations or General Manager, or both.

Links to related articles

v t e

UMass Lowell River Hawks men's basketball
UMass Lowell River Hawks men's basketball
head coaches

Jim Stone (1975–1976) Tony Ramano (1976–1983) Don Doucette (1983–1988) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(1988–1992) Gary Manchel (1992–2001) Ken Barer (2001–2008) Greg Herenda (2008–2013) Pat Duquette (2013– )

v t e

Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball
Wisconsin Badgers men's basketball
head coaches

James C. Elsom (1898–1904) Emmett Angell (1904–1908) Haskell Noyes (1908–1911) Walter Meanwell
Walter Meanwell
(1911–1917) Guy Lowman
Guy Lowman
(1917–1920) Walter Meanwell
Walter Meanwell
(1920–1934) Harold E. Foster (1934–1959) John Erickson (1959–1968) John Powless (1968–1976) Bill Cofield (1976–1982) Steve Yoder (1982–1992) Stu Jackson
Stu Jackson
(1992–1994) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(1994–1995) Dick Bennett (1995–2000) Brad Soderberg # (2000–2001) Bo Ryan
Bo Ryan
(2001–2015) Greg Gard
Greg Gard
(2015– )

Pound sign (#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Miami Heat
Miami Heat
head coaches

Ron Rothstein
Ron Rothstein
(1988–1991) Kevin Loughery (1991–1995) Alvin Gentry
Alvin Gentry
# (1995) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(1995–2003) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(2003–2005) Pat Riley
Pat Riley
(2005–2008) Erik Spoelstra
Erik Spoelstra
(2008– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Orlando Magic
Orlando Magic
head coaches

Matt Guokas (1989–1993) Brian Hill (1993–1997) Richie Adubato # (1997) Chuck Daly
Chuck Daly
(1997–1999) Doc Rivers
Doc Rivers
(1999–2003) Johnny Davis (2003–2005) Chris Jent # (2005) Brian Hill (2005–2007) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(2007–2012) Jacque Vaughn
Jacque Vaughn
(2012–2015) James Borrego # (2015) Scott Skiles
Scott Skiles
(2015–2016) Frank Vogel
Frank Vogel
(2016– )

(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Detroit Pistons
Detroit Pistons
head coaches

Carl Bennett (1948) Curly Armstrong (1948–1949) Murray Mendenhall (1949–1951) Paul Birch (1951–1954) Charley Eckman (1954–1957) Red Rocha (1957–1960) Dick McGuire (1959–1963) Charles Wolf (1963–1964) Dave DeBusschere
Dave DeBusschere
(1964–1967) Donnie Butcher (1967–1968) Paul Seymour (1968–1969) Butch van Breda Kolff (1969–1971) Terry Dischinger
Terry Dischinger
(1971) Earl Lloyd
Earl Lloyd
(1971–1972) Ray Scott (1972–1976) Herb Brown
Herb Brown
(1976–1977) Bob Kauffman
Bob Kauffman
# (1977–1978) Dick Vitale
Dick Vitale
(1978–1979) Richie Adubato # (1979–1980) Scotty Robertson (1980–1983) Chuck Daly
Chuck Daly
(1983–1992) Ron Rothstein
Ron Rothstein
(1992–1993) Don Chaney
Don Chaney
(1993–1995) Doug Collins (1995–1998) Alvin Gentry
Alvin Gentry
(1998–2000) George Irvine (2000–2001) Rick Carlisle
Rick Carlisle
(2001–2003) Larry Brown (2003–2005) Flip Saunders
Flip Saunders
(2005–2008) Michael Curry (2008–2009) John Kuester
John Kuester
(2009–2011) Lawrence Frank (2011–2013) Maurice Cheeks
Maurice Cheeks
(2013–2014) John Loyer
John Loyer
# (2014) Stan Van Gundy
Stan Van Gundy
(2014– )

(#) denotes i

.