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Amos Alonzo Stagg
Amos Alonzo Stagg
Field is the name of two different football fields for the University of Chicago. The earliest Stagg Field
Stagg Field
(1893–1957) is probably best remembered for its role in a landmark scientific achievement by Enrico Fermi
Enrico Fermi
during the Manhattan Project. The site of the first artificial nuclear chain reaction, which occurred within the west viewing stands structure, received designation as a National Historic Landmark on February 18, 1965.[1] On October 15, 1966, which is the day that the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966
was enacted creating the National Register of Historic Places, it was added to that as well.[2] The site was named a Chicago Landmark
Chicago Landmark
on October 27, 1971.[3] A Henry Moore
Henry Moore
sculpture, Nuclear Energy, in a small quadrangle commemorates the location of the nuclear experiment.[1] The University's current Stagg Field
Stagg Field
is located a few blocks away and reuses one of the original gates.

Contents

1 First nuclear chain reaction 2 Sports venue

2.1 First Stagg Field 2.2 New Stagg Field

3 See also 4 References 5 External links

First nuclear chain reaction[edit] Main article: Chicago
Chicago
Pile-1 Chicago
Chicago
Pile-1, the world's first artificial nuclear reactor, was built under the west stands of Stagg Field, which was by then no longer used for football.[4] The first man-made self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction occurred on December 2, 1942. Sports venue[edit] First Stagg Field[edit]

Stagg Field
Stagg Field
in 1927 with the west stands in the foreground and the south stands (center-right) filled with spectators

The first Stagg Field
Stagg Field
was a stadium at the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
in Chicago. It was primarily used for college football games, and was the home field of the Maroons. Stagg Field
Stagg Field
originally opened in 1893 as Marshall Field, named after Marshall Field
Marshall Field
who donated land to the university to build the stadium.[5] In 1913, the field was renamed Stagg Field
Stagg Field
after their famous coach Amos Alonzo Stagg. The final capacity, after several stadium expansions, was 50,000. The University of Chicago
Chicago
discontinued its football program after 1939 and left the Big Ten Conference
Big Ten Conference
in 1946. The stadium was demolished in 1957,[6] and much of the stadium site was re-utilized as the site of Regenstein Library. In addition to Maroons football, the stadium hosted other events. These include the 1936 US Olympic Trials for Track and Field held June 19–20, 1936 and the NCAA Men's Track and Field Championships in 1921, 1922, 1923, 1929, 1930, 1931, 1932, 1933, and 1936. Northwestern also played a number home games at Stagg Field. At the turn of the 20th century, Northwestern was unable to handle large crowds, so they hosted then-powerhouse Minnesota at Marshall Field
Marshall Field
for a 1901 game and a 1904 game. In 1925 (a year prior to the opening of Dyche Stadium) Northwestern again was unable to accommodate large crowds, and as a result played two games at Stagg Field. The first was a notable win over Michigan. The second was an October 24 game against Tulane that had originally been scheduled to be played at Soldier Field instead. Tulane won the game at Stagg Field
Stagg Field
18-7.[7] The University of Michigan fight song "The Victors" was written by Michigan music student Louis Elbel in 1898, following a 12-11 Michigan victory over the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
at Stagg Field. New Stagg Field[edit]

Stagg Field
Stagg Field
in 2013

The current Stagg Field
Stagg Field
is an athletic field located several blocks to the northwest that preserves the Stagg Field
Stagg Field
name, as well as a relocated gate from the original facility. The school's current Division III football team uses the new field as their home. Stagg Field has a seating capacity of 1,650, and the playing surface is made of FieldTurf.[8] It is home to the Chicago
Chicago
Maroons football, soccer, softball and outdoor track teams. See also[edit]

Enrico Fermi

References[edit]

^ a b Site of First Self-Sustaining Nuclear Reaction, NHL Database, National Historic Landmarks Program. Retrieved 11 February 2007. ^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ "Site of the First Self-Sustaining Controlled Nuclear Chain Reaction". City of Chicago
Chicago
Department of Planning and Development, Landmarks Division. 2003. Retrieved March 31, 2007.  ^ Zug, J. (2003). Squash, A History of the Game. Scribner. pp. 135–136. ISBN 978-0-7432-2990-6.  ^ http://athletics.uchicago.edu/sports/fball/2017-18/media-guide ^ "The Way Things Work: Nuclear waste". The Chicago
Chicago
Maroon. Retrieved 2012-06-18.  ^ "Historic Sites of All NU Home Games". hailtopurple.com. Retrieved July 25, 2014.  ^ " University of Chicago
University of Chicago
Ratner Center Visiting Guide" (PDF). University of Chicago, Athletics Department. Retrieved 2010-07-15. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Stagg Field.

University of Chicago
University of Chicago
Photographic Archive Photos of Old Stagg Field AtomicArchive.com Photographs from assembling the pile Drawing of the first atomic pile Artist drawing of CP-1 The Story of the First Pile

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Stagg Field
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Coordinates: 41°47′38″N 87°36′14″W / 41.79389°N 87.60389°W / 4

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