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Scrotum
HQ SAM ST2.jpg
Human scrotum in a relaxed state (left) and a tense state (right)
Details
PrecursorLabioscrotal folds
ArteryAnterior scrotal artery & Posterior scrotal artery
VeinTesticular vein
NervePosterior scrotal nerves, Anterior scrotal nerves, genital branch of genitofemoral nerve, perineal branches of posterior femoral cutaneous nerve
LymphSuperficial inguinal lymph nodes
Identifiers
LatinScrotum
MeSHD012611
TA98A09.4.03.001
A09.4.03.004
TA23693
FMA18252
Anatomical terminology

The scrotum is an anatomical male reproductive structure located caudal to the penis that consists of a suspended dual-chambered sack of skin and smooth muscle. It is present in most terrestrial male mammals. The scrotum contains the external spermatic fascia, testes, epididymis, and ductus deferens. It is a distention of the perineum and carries some abdominal tissues into its cavity including the testicular artery, testicular vein, and pampiniform plexus. The perineal raphe is a small, vertical, slightly raised ridge of scrotal skin under which is found the scrotal septum. It appears as a thin longitudinal line that runs front to back over the entire scrotum. In humans and some other mammals the scrotum becomes covered with pubic hair at puberty. The scrotum will usually tighten during penile erection and when exposed to cold temperature. One testis is typically lower than the other to avoid compression in the event of impact.[1]

The scrotum is biologically homologous to the labia majora in females. Although present in most mammals, the external scrotum is absent in streamlined marine mammals, such as whales and seals,[2] as well as in some lineages of land mammals, such as the afrotherians, xenarthrans, and numerous families of bats, rodents, and insectivores.[3][4]