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Samsat (Kurdish: Samîsad‎)[1] is a small town and district in the Adıyaman Province of Turkey, situated on the upper Euphrates river. Halil Fırat from the Justice and Development Party (AKP) was elected mayor in the local elections in March 2019.[2] The current Kaymakam is Halid Yıldız.[3]

The current site of Samsat is comparatively new, however, being built only since 1989 when the old town of Samosata was flooded during construction of the Atatürk Dam.[4] Indeed, to some extent the re-construction of the town is still ongoing[5] A even more ancient tell nearby dating back to the paleolithic era has survived to the current day.

In 2016 the town had a population of 3789,[6] down from 4720 in 2008 and a peak of 6.917 in 2000.

  • ^ Not to be confused with a later Sames/Samos (Sames II), who ruled Commagene in the second century BCE
  • ^ Brijder, Herman (2014). Nemrud Dagi : recent archaeological research and conservation activities in the tomb sanctuary on Mount Nemrud. ISBN 9781614519058.
  • ^ Chahin, Mark (2001). The Kingdom of Armenia. Routledge. pp. 190–191. ISBN 0-7007-1452-9.
  • ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.42.
  • ^ Mansi, Conciliorum collectio, XVII-XVIII, 445.
  • ^ Le Quien, Oriens christianus, II,

    We know nothing about the status of Commagene under Seleucid rule. The Armenian king Samos I is believed to have founded Samosata, later the capital of Commagene, in the middle of the third century BC. The second century BC saw the rise of the two powers that would play an important role in Commagene's future during the next centuries: Rome and Parthia. Their growing prominence, combined with the failing of the central Seleucid power, resulted in the rise of several small monarchies, of which Commagene was one. Other independent kingdoms that came into being around this time include Pergamon, Pontos, Baktria, Parthia, Armenia, Iudea and Nabatea. Diodorus tells us that a Seleucid epistates named Ptolemy rose to power in Commagene in 163 BC. Most scholars assume that Ptolemy was the first Commagenean king and that he descended from the Armenian Orontids. We know virtually nothing about the following decades. Samos II took power around 130 BC, as is concluded from some coins that have been preserved, showing a portrait with the inscription “king Samos.”

  • ^ Not to be confused with a later Sames/Samos (Sames II), who ruled Commagene in the second century BCE
  • ^ Brijder, Herman (2014). Nemrud Dagi : recent archaeological research and conservation activities in the tomb sanctuary on Mount Nemrud. ISBN 9781614519058.
  • ^ Chahin, Mark (2001). The Kingdom of Armenia. Routledge. pp. 190–191. ISBN 0-7007-1452-9.
  • ^ Tacitus, The Annals 2.42.
  • ^ Mansi, Conciliorum collectio, XVII-XVIII, 445.
  • ^ Le Quien, Oriens christianus, II, 994.
  • ^ Le Quien, Oriens chr