HOME
        TheInfoList






SPARQL (pronounced "sparkle" /ˈspɑːkəl/, a recursive acronym[2] for SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language) is an RDF query language—that is, a semantic query language for databases—able to retrieve and manipulate data stored in Resource Description Framework (RDF) format.[3][4] It was made a standard by the RDF Data Access Working Group (DAWG) of the World Wide Web Consortium, and is recognized as one of the key technologies of the semantic web.SPARQL (pronounced "sparkle" /ˈspɑːkəl/, a recursive acronym[2] for SPARQL Protocol and RDF Query Language) is an RDF query language—that is, a semantic query language for databases—able to retrieve and manipulate data stored in Resource Description Framework (RDF) format.[3][4] It was made a standard by the RDF Data Access Working Group (DAWG) of the World Wide Web Consortium, and is recognized as one of the key technologies of the semantic web.[citation needed] On 15 January 2008, SPARQL 1.0 was acknowledged by W3C as an official recommendation,[5][6] and SPARQL 1.1 in March, 2013.[7]

SPARQL allows for a query to consist of triple patterns, conjunctions, disjunctions, and optional patterns.[8]

Implementations for multiple programming languages exist.[9] There exist tools that allow one to connect and semi-automatically construct a SPARQL query for a SPARQL endpoint, for example ViziQuer.[10] In addition, tools exist to translate SPARQL queries to other query languages, for example to SQL[11] and to XQuery.[12]

Variables are indicated by a ? or $ prefix. Bindings for ?capital and the ?country will be returned. When a triple ends with a semicolon, the subject from this triple will implicitly complete the following pair to an entire triple. So for example ex:isCapitalOf ?y is short for ?x ex:isCapitalOf ?y.

The SPARQL query processor will search for sets of triples that match thes

The SPARQL query processor will search for sets of triples that match these four triple patterns, binding the variables in the query to the corresponding parts of each triple. Important to note here is the "property orientation" (class matches can be conducted solely through class-attributes or properties – see Duck typing)

To make queries concise, SPARQL allows the definition of prefixes and base URIs in a fashion similar to Turtle. In this query, the prefix "ex" stands for “http://example.com/exampleOntology#”.

GeoSPARQL defines filter functions for geographic information system (GIS) queries using well-understood OGC standards (GML, WKT, etc.).

SPARUL is another extension to SPARQL. It enables the RDF store to be updated with this declarative query language, by adding INSERT and DELETE methods.

Implementations

SPARUL is another extension to SPARQL. It enables the RDF store to be updated with this declarative query language, by adding INSERT and DELETE methods.

Open source, reference SPARQL implementations