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Reggae
Reggae
en Español (in English, Spanish Reggae[1]) is reggae and dancehall music recorded in the Spanish language
Spanish language
by artists of Latin American origin. It originated in the mid-1970s in Panama. Reggae
Reggae
en Español goes by several names: In Panama
Panama
it is called La Plena. Currently, Reggae
Reggae
en Español contains three main subgenres: reggae 110, reggae bultrón, and romantic flow. In addition, and although technically they would not fall into the category of Reggae
Reggae
en Español even though it derived from Jamaican dancehall rhythms, Reggae
Reggae
en Español also includes two music fusions: reggae soca and dancehall.[2]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Early developments

2 References 3 External links

3.1 Official reggae in Spanish websites

History[edit]

Bob Marley, inspiration for the Reggae
Reggae
en Español.

Early developments[edit] Main article: Panamanian Reggae Reggae
Reggae
as a musical genre has its origins in Jamaica, and it became popular throughout the 1970s in the black-immigrant communities of the other British West Indies, North America, and Great Britain. Jamaican reggae was embraced in the Spanish-speaking world first in Panama
Panama
by the descendants of black workers that immigrated to the Isthmus during the construction of the Panama
Panama
Railroad (mid-19th century), the railways for the banana companies (late 19th century), and the Panama Canal (early 20th century).[3] Prior to the period of construction of the Panama
Panama
Canal (1904–1915), most of the Afro- Caribbean
Caribbean
communities in Panama
Panama
were of Jamaican descent, but with the construction of the canal these communities grew in diversity with immigrants from other parts of the Caribbean
Caribbean
such as Jamaica, Barbados, Martinique, Guadeloupe, Haiti, Trinidad, Dominica, French and British Guyana
Guyana
and other Caribbean
Caribbean
Islands.[4] In 1977, a Guyanese immigrant who went by the nickname "Guyana", along with a local DJ known as "Wassabanga" introduced for first time the reggae rhythms in Panama
Panama
with lyrics in Spanish.[5] Wassabanga's music along with later interpreters such as Rastanini and Calito Soul, were perhaps the first remarkable cases of Reggae
Reggae
en Español, at a time when many Panamanians were already developing a musical and spiritual bond with the Mecca of reggae music (Kingston, Jamaica), a bond catalyzed mainly by the call to arms issued by the music of Bob Marley.[6] In 1984, Hernando Brin produced the first record in the world of Reggae
Reggae
in Spanish on vinyl, called Treadmit,[7] composed by Calvin Calderon (Omega), Hactor Wakler, Erick Green (Gringo) and Hernando Brin (Super Nandi). The record was produced by record label Prodim in Panama, and it included the first song by Rastanini called "Padre Por Favor Educa a los Niños" (Father Please Educate the Children).[7] In the early-mid-1980s, Panamanians like Renato, El General, Nando Boom, El Maleante, and Chicho Man started to take Jamaican dancehall songs and beats, singing over them with Spanish lyrics, most of the time preserving the melodies and the rhythms. They also sped up riddims, and added Hispanic and Latino elements to them. This style was called Reggae
Reggae
en Español or "Spanish Reggae".[1] The music continued to grow throughout the 1980s, with many stars developing in Panama. Between the 1980s and 1990s, the Panamanian artist Chicho Man emerged as one of the greater exponents of Panamanian reggae.[8] In his short five-year career as an artist,[8] he introduced the "romantic" element in Spanish Reggae, and produced only one LP which included songs like "La Noche Que Te Conocí", "Lady in Red", "Llega Navidad", "Muévela", "No Quiero Ir a Isla Coiba" and "Un Nuevo Estilo".[8] His songs were recorded in a warehouse, where a Panamanian producer called Calito LPD produced reggae instrumental tracks and recorded them in cassette.[8] After serving a term in US prison he announced his withdrawal from the reggae scene to become a Christian preacher.[8] In the 1990s, the genre had grown in Panama. In 1996, came artists such as Aldo Ranks, El Renegado, Jam & Suppose who sang the hit "Camión Lleno de Gun".[9] Jr. Ranks and Tony Bull already had good records with late singer Danger Man and they formed the musical group called The Killamanjaros. By the other side in the year 1991, the singer Apache Ness with Papa Chan, Kafu Banton, Calito Soul, Wassa Banga, and Original Dan decided to join forces and create the foundation "One Love One Blood" singing about urban street experiences under the rhythm called reggae bultrón.[10] Later in Panama, the romanticism had been mixed with the reggae and the reggae romántico ("romantic reggae"), now better known as romantic flow, was born. Those who keep alive the reggae with romantic lyrics are the following: Flex (aka Nigga), El Roockie, El Aspirante, Kathy Phillips, Eddy Lover, Tommy Real, Makano, Catherine, as well as groups like: Raíces y Cultura and La Factoría who became famous by the Panamanian producer Irving DiBlasio.[11] In 1996, considered the golden age of Panamanian reggae, appeared the productions Los Cuentos de la Cripta and La Mafia by the producer El Chombo, with songs like: "Las Chicas Quieren Chorizo" (The Girls Want Chorizo) by Wassabanga, "El Cubo de Leche" sung by Jam & Suppose and "Estaban Celebrando" by Aldo Ranks. References[edit]

^ a b Wayne Marshall (2006-01-19). "Rise of Reggaetón". The Phoenix. Retrieved 2006-07-24.  ^ Historia del Reggae
Reggae
En Español (La Plena) - LATINBEATMAG.COM " ^ Before the Reggaeton
Reggaeton
History - REGGAE.COM.PA ^ [1] THE AFRICAN PRESENCE IN PANAMA--FROM THE CANAL TO COLON CITY ^ The Roots of Reggaeton
Reggaeton
called " Reggae
Reggae
en español" ^ Manuel, Peter. Caribbean
Caribbean
Music
Music
from Rumba to Reggae, 2 edition. March 28, 2006. Temple University Press. Retrieved on 2009-02-10. ^ a b "Soy el 1er cantante de reggae en Panamá (I'm the first singer of reggae in Panama)" ^ a b c d e Chicho Man, the missionary of God ^ Jam & Suppose - Camion lleno de Gun ^ Apache Ness, One Love One Blood ^ MiDiario.Com: "DIBLASIO catolic music awards". Url

External links[edit]

RitualReggae Reggae
Reggae
Argentino Reggae
Reggae
en españa Reggae
Reggae
en Costa Rica Reggae
Reggae
en Venezuela El Rasta - Reggae
Reggae
en español Puertoreggae - Reggae
Reggae
en Puerto Rico Raíces Rústicas - Reggae
Reggae
Lounge

Official reggae in Spanish websites[edit]

Plena507 Reggae.com.pa PanamaReggae Nextplena.com

v t e

Reggae

Genres

Roots reggae Dub Dub poetry Lovers rock Dancehall Reggaeton Reggae
Reggae
en Español Reggae
Reggae
fusion Ragga Ragga
Ragga
jungle Samba reggae Nyabinghi rhythm Grime

Characteristics

Deejay (Toasting) Delay Hammond organ One drop and rockers Reverb Singjay Skank Walking bass

People and groups

Reggae
Reggae
Grammy winners 1985-present Reggae
Reggae
musicians Reggae
Reggae
rock artists Reggae
Reggae
fusion artists Roots reggae
Roots reggae
artists Dub artists Jamaican record producers Reggae
Reggae
bands from the Virgin Islands

By region

Music
Music
of Jamaica Pinoy reggae Reggae
Reggae
in Australia New Zealand reggae

Related topics

List of reggae festivals Caribbean
Caribbean
Music Caribbean
Caribbean
music in the United Kingdom Rastafari Rude boy Skinhead Suedehead Dance Hall (venue) Dubplate Sound system (Jamaican) Sound system (DJ) Riddim Jamaican English Jamaican Patois Studio One Trojan Records Island Records Blue Beat

v t e

Music
Music
genres in the Hispanosphere

Andean

Bambuco Carnavalito Chicha music Diablada Huayno Morenada Saya Tinku

Spaniard folk

Catalan rumba Copla Fandango Flamenco

Alboreá Bulerías Cantiñas Rumba flamenca Saeta Soleá

Folia Isa (from Canary Islands) Jota Malagueña (Spanish music genre) Pasodoble Tajaraste Xiringüelu (from Asturias) Zarzuela

Latin urban

Bachatón Latin hip hop

Argentine Chicano Colombian Cuban Dominican Salvadoran Spanish Venezuelan

Raptor house Reggae Reggaeton Salsa Choque

Litoraleña

Chamarrita Guarania Paraguayan polka

Chamamé

Peruvian coastal

Afro-Peruvian music

Festejo Landó Son de los Diablos Toro Mata

Marinera Polca Tondero Vals Zamacueca

Latin pop and protest music

Ballad Colombian Mexican Nueva canción Nueva trova

Regional Mexican

Corrido Conjunto Norteño

Nortec

Sierreña Grupera Tejano Duranguense Banda Mariachi

Jarabe Ranchera

Trival Polka

South Cone

Candombe Milonga Murga Tango

Rock

Alternative Argentine Chicano Chilean Colombian Cuban Dominican Metal Mexican Nueva ola Peruvian Puerto Rican Spanish Uruguayan Venezuelan

Traditional folk

Chacarera Escondido Gaita zuliana Gato Joropo Mozamala Resbalosa Tonada Zamacueca

Cueca Marinera Zamba

Caribbean

Bachata Bolero Calypso Cha-cha-cha Champeta Changüí Charanga Conga Cuarteto Cumbia

Argentine Bullerengue Colombian Mexican New Chilean cumbia Peruvian Tecnocumbia Villera

Danzón Fusion Guajira Guaracha Mambo Merengue Méringue Pachanga Porro Rumba

Guaguancó

Salsa

dura romántica

Son cubano

montuno

Mexican Son

huasteco jalisciense jarocho

Timba Vallenato
Vallenato
(Charanga-vallenata)

Music
Music
of Africa

Tbal Mvet Tam-tam

Other genres

Aguinaldo Bomba Bomba del Chota Bunde Canción melódica Christian Contradanza Criolla Danza Décima Spanish jazz Mapalé Spanish opera Pasacalle Pasillo Plena Pregón Punto guajiro Seis Tambor Trova Villancico

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