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The Info List - Phil Jackson


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As player:

NBA champion (1970, 1973) NBA All-Rookie First Team
NBA All-Rookie First Team
(1968) 2× First-team Division II All-American (1966, 1967)

As head coach:

11× NBA champion (1991–1993, 1996–1998, 2000–2002, 2009, 2010) 4× NBA All-Star Game head coach (1992, 1996, 2000, 2009) NBA Coach of the Year (1996) Top 10 Coaches in NBA History

Career statistics

Points 5,428 (6.7 ppg)

Rebounds 3,454 (4.3 rpg)

Assists 898 (1.1 apg)

Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Basketball Hall of Fame
Basketball Hall of Fame
as coach

Philip Douglas Jackson (born September 17, 1945) is a former American professional basketball player, coach and executive in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Jackson was the head coach of the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
from 1989 until 1998, during which time Chicago
Chicago
won six NBA championships. He then coached the Los Angeles Lakers, who won five championships from 2000 until 2010. In total, Jackson has won 11 NBA titles as a coach, surpassing the previous record of nine set by Red Auerbach. He also won two championships as a player with the New York Knicks in 1970 and 1973,[1] and holds the NBA record for the most combined championships (13). Jackson is known for his use of Tex Winter's triangle offense as well as an holistic approach to coaching that is influenced by Eastern philosophy, earning him the nickname "Zen Master". Jackson cites Robert Pirsig's book Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance
as one of the major guiding forces in his life. He also applies Native American spiritual practices as documented in his book Sacred Hoops.[2] He is the author of several candid books about his teams and his basketball strategies. Jackson is also a recipient of the state of North Dakota's Roughrider Award. In 2007, Jackson was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame.[3] In 1996, as part of celebrations for the National Basketball Association's 50th anniversary, Jackson was named one of the 10 greatest coaches in league history.[4][5][6][7] He retired from coaching in 2011 before joining the Knicks as an executive in March 2014.[8][9] He was let go as the Knicks' team president on June 28, 2017.[10]

Contents

1 Early life 2 High school career 3 College career 4 NBA playing career 5 Coaching career

5.1 Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
(1987–1998) 5.2 Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
(1999–2004) 5.3 Return to the Lakers (2005–2011)

6 Executive career 7 Awards 8 Head coaching record 9 Personal life 10 Books 11 See also 12 References 13 Further reading 14 External links

Early life[edit] Jackson was born in Deer Lodge, Montana. Both of his parents, Charles and Elisabeth Funk[11] Jackson, were Assemblies of God ministers. Elisabeth came from a long line of German Mennonites before her conversion to the Assemblies of God. In the churches that they served, his father generally preached on Sunday mornings and his mother on Sunday evenings. Eventually, his father became a ministerial supervisor.[11] Phil, his two brothers, and his half-sister grew up in a remote area of Montana in an austere environment, in which no dancing or television was allowed. Jackson did not see his first movie until he was a senior in high school, and went to a dance for the first time in college.[11] Growing up, he assumed he would become a minister. High school career[edit] Jackson attended high school in Williston, North Dakota, where he played varsity basketball and led the team to two state titles. He also played football, was a pitcher on the baseball team, and threw the discus in track and field competitions.[11] The high school now has a sports complex named after him.[12] His brother Chuck speculated years later that the three Jackson sons threw themselves passionately into athletics because it was the only time they were allowed to do what other children were doing.[11] Jackson attracted the attention of several baseball scouts. Their notes found their way to future NBA coach Bill Fitch, who had previously coached baseball, and had been doing some scouting for the Atlanta Braves. Fitch took over as head basketball coach at the University of North Dakota
North Dakota
in the spring of 1962, during Jackson's junior year of high school.[11] College career[edit] Bill Fitch successfully recruited Jackson to the University of North Dakota, where he was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity.[11][13] Jackson did well there, helping the Fighting Sioux to third- and fourth-place finishes in the NCAA Division II
NCAA Division II
tournament in his sophomore and junior years (1965 and 1966). Both years, they were beaten by the Southern Illinois Salukis.[11] Jackson's future Knicks teammate Walt Frazier
Walt Frazier
was the Salukis' biggest star, but the two only faced off in 1965, as Frazier was academically ineligible in 1966. NBA playing career[edit]

Jackson circa 1968

In 1967, Jackson was drafted in the second round by the New York Knicks. While he was a good all-around athlete, with unusually long arms, he was limited offensively and compensated with intelligence and hard work on defense.[11] Jackson eventually established himself as a fan favorite and one of the NBA's leading substitutes, although he had very little playing time. He was a top reserve on the Knicks team that won the NBA title in 1973. Jackson did not play during New York's 1969–70 championship season due to spinal fusion surgery; however, he authored a book entitled Take It All, a photo diary of the Knicks' 1970 championship run. Soon after the 1973 title, several key starters retired, creating an opening for Jackson in the starting lineup.[11] In the 1974–75 NBA season, Jackson and the Milwaukee Bucks' Bob Dandridge shared the lead for total personal fouls, with 330 each.[14] Jackson lived in Leonia, New Jersey, during this time.[15] After going across the Hudson in 1978 to play two seasons for the New Jersey Nets, he retired as a player in 1980. Coaching career[edit] In the following years, he mainly coached in lower-level professional leagues, notably the Continental Basketball Association
Continental Basketball Association
and Puerto Rico's National Superior Basketball
National Superior Basketball
(BSN). While in the CBA, he won his first coaching championship, leading the Albany Patroons
Albany Patroons
to their first CBA title in 1984. In Puerto Rico, he coached the Piratas de Quebradillas (1984 and 1987) and the Gallitos de Isabela (1984–1986), both have good standing within the Puerto Rican league. He regularly sought an NBA job, but was invariably turned down. He had acquired a reputation for being sympathetic to the counterculture during his playing years, which may have scared off potential NBA employers.[11] Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
(1987–1998)[edit] Jackson was hired as assistant coach, under Doug Collins, for the Bulls in 1987, and was promoted to head coach in 1989. It was around this time that he met Tex Winter
Tex Winter
and became a devotee of Winter's triangle offense.[16][17] Over nine seasons, Jackson coached the Bulls to six championships, winning three straight championships over separate three-year periods. The "three-peat" was the first since the Boston Celtics
Boston Celtics
won eight titles in a row from 1959 through 1966.

Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
(left) and Phil Jackson

Jackson and the Bulls made the playoffs every year, and failed to win the title only three times. Michael Jordan's first retirement after the 1992–1993 season marked the end of the first "three-peat", and although Jordan returned just before the 1995 playoffs, it was not enough to prevent a playoff elimination by the Orlando Magic. Despite the Bulls' success, tension between Jackson and Bulls general manager Jerry Krause grew. Some believed that Krause felt under-recognized for building a championship team and believed that Jackson was indebted to him for giving him his first NBA coaching job. In the summer of 1997, Jackson was not invited to the wedding of Krause's stepdaughter, although all of the Bulls' assistant coaches were, as was Tim Floyd, then head coach at Iowa State, Jackson's eventual successor.[11] After contentious negotiations, Jackson was signed for the 1997–98 season only. Krause announced the signing by emphasizing that Jackson would not be rehired even if the Bulls won the 1997–98 title. Jackson then told Krause that he seemed to be rooting for the other side, to which Krause responded, "I don't care if it's 82-and-0 this year, you're fucking gone."[11] Krause publicly portrayed Jackson as a two-faced character who had very little regard for his assistant coaches. After the Bulls' final title of the Jordan era in 1998, Jackson left the team vowing never to coach again.[18] However, after taking a year off, he decided to give it another chance with the Los Angeles Lakers in 1999. Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
(1999–2004)[edit] Jackson took over a talented Lakers team and immediately produced results as he did in Chicago. In his first year in Los Angeles, the Lakers went 67–15 during the regular season to top the league. Reaching the conference finals, they dispatched the Portland Trail Blazers in a tough seven-game series and then won the 2000 NBA championship by beating the Indiana Pacers. With the talented superstar duo of Shaquille O'Neal
Shaquille O'Neal
and Kobe Bryant, the strong supporting cast of Glen Rice, Derek Fisher, Rick Fox, Devean George, A. C. Green, Robert Horry, and Brian Shaw, and the assistance of former Bulls Horace Grant, Ron Harper, and John Salley, Jackson would lead the Lakers to two additional titles in 2001 and 2002, against the Philadelphia 76ers and New Jersey Nets, adding up to his third three-peat as head coach. The main serious challenge the Lakers faced was from their conference rival, the Sacramento Kings.

Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
coaching the Lakers

However, injuries, weak bench play, and full-blown public tension between Bryant and O'Neal slowed the team down, and they were beaten in the second round of the 2003 NBA Playoffs by the eventual champion San Antonio Spurs. Afterward, Jackson clashed frequently with Bryant. While remarkably efficient in Jackson's "triangle offense", Bryant had a personal distaste for Jackson's brand of basketball and subsequently called it "boring". In games, Bryant would often disregard the set offense completely to experiment with his own one-on-one moves, incensing the normally calm Jackson. Bryant managed to test Jackson's patience enough that the "Zen Master" even demanded that Bryant be traded, although Laker management rejected the request. Prior to the 2003–04 season, the Lakers signed NBA star veterans Karl Malone
Karl Malone
and Gary Payton, who had been franchise players for the Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
and the Seattle SuperSonics, respectively, leading to predictions by some that the team would finish with the best record in NBA history. But from the first day of training camp, the Lakers were beset by distractions. Bryant's trial for alleged sexual assault, continued public sniping between O'Neal and Bryant, and repeated disputes between Jackson and Bryant all affected the team during the season. Despite these distractions, the Lakers beat the defending champion Spurs en route to advancing to the 2004 NBA Finals
2004 NBA Finals
and were heavy favorites to regain the title. However, they were upset by the Detroit Pistons, who used their strong defense to dominate the Lakers, winning the title four games to one. This marked the first time in ten attempts as head coach that Jackson had lost in the NBA Finals. On June 18, 2004, three days after the loss to the Pistons, the Lakers announced that Jackson would leave his position as Lakers coach. Jackson was seeking to double his salary from $6 million to $12 million on his expiring contract. He had a contract offer outstanding from the Lakers, but he had not acted on it.[19] Winter said Jackson announced at the All-Star break that he would not want to return to the Lakers if Bryant returned.[19] Many fans attributed Jackson's departure directly to the wishes of Bryant, as Lakers owner Dr. Jerry Buss
Jerry Buss
reportedly sided with Bryant. Jackson, Bryant and Buss all denied that Bryant had made any explicit demand regarding Jackson. However, O'Neal, upon hearing General Manager Mitch Kupchak's announcement of the team's willingness to trade O'Neal and its intention to keep Bryant, indicated that he felt the franchise was indeed pandering to Bryant's wishes with the departure of Jackson. O'Neal's trade to the Miami Heat was the end of the "Trifecta" that had led the Lakers to three championship titles. That fall, Jackson released The Last Season, a book which describes his point of view of the tensions that surrounded the 2003–04 Lakers team. The book was pointedly critical of Kobe Bryant. Without Jackson and O'Neal the Lakers were forced to become a faster paced team on the court. Though they achieved some success in the first half of the season, injuries to several players including Kobe Bryant and Lamar Odom
Lamar Odom
forced the team out of contention, going 34–48 in 2004–05 and missing the playoffs for the first time in 11 years. Rudy Tomjanovich, Jackson's successor as coach, resigned midway through the season after coaching just 41 games, citing health issues not relating to his past bout with bladder cancer, which immediately led to speculation that the Lakers might bring Jackson back. Return to the Lakers (2005–2011)[edit] On June 15, 2005, the Lakers rehired Jackson. Jackson led the Lakers to a seventh-seed playoff berth. Once again promoting the notion of selfless team play embodied by the triangle offense, the team achieved substantial results, especially in the last month of the season. Jackson also worked seamlessly with Bryant, who had earlier shown his desire to bring back Jackson to the bench. Bryant's regular-season performance won him the league scoring title and made him a finalist in MVP voting. However, the Lakers faced a tough 2006 first-round matchup against the second-seeded Phoenix Suns, who were led by eventual MVP winner Steve Nash. It was the first time that Jackson's team had failed to reach the second round of the playoffs. The Lakers jumped out to a 3–1 lead following a dramatic last second shot by Bryant in overtime to win game four, but the Suns recovered to win the last three and take the series.

Jackson (right) in 2008, standing next to Lakers assistant coach Frank Hamblen (left).

On January 7, 2007, Jackson won his 900th game, then placing him 9th on the all-time win list for NBA coaches. With this win, Jackson became the fastest to reach 900 career wins, doing so in only 1,264 games and beating Pat Riley's previous record of 900 in 1,278 games. On December 12, 2007, after announcing he would return to his position as coach just a few days prior, Jackson inked a 2-year contract extension to continue his tenure with the Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
through the end of the 2009–2010 season. During the 2007–08 season, the Lakers were able to obtain Pau Gasol in a trade with the Memphis Grizzlies. With another star to pair with Bryant, Jackson coached the Lakers to an appearance in the 2008 NBA Finals against the Boston Celtics. Boston went on to win the series 4–2, in the process handing Jackson and the Lakers their worst playoff loss ever in Game 6, a 39-point defeat. It was only the 2nd time in 11 appearances that Jackson had lost an NBA Finals. On December 25, 2008, Jackson became the sixth coach to win 1,000 games, with the Lakers defeating the Celtics in their first matchup since the last year's finals. He was the fastest to win 1,000 games, surpassing Pat Riley, who had taken 11 more games than Jackson. Jackson again coached the Lakers to the NBA Finals
NBA Finals
in 2009, defeating the Utah Jazz, Houston Rockets, and Denver Nuggets in the process. In the Finals, the Lakers defeated the Orlando Magic 4–1, clinching Jackson's 10th NBA championship as head coach and surpassing the record for most championships won by a head coach previously held by him and Red Auerbach. On February 3, 2010, Jackson recorded his 534th win as Lakers head coach, surpassing Pat Riley
Pat Riley
to become the most successful coach in franchise history. The Lakers would go on to a fifth consecutive playoff berth in 2010. They defeated the Oklahoma City Thunder, Utah Jazz, and Phoenix Suns in the playoffs before defeating the Boston Celtics in the 2010 NBA Finals, earning Jackson his eleventh NBA championship as head coach and his fifth with the Lakers.[20] He tied original Lakers head coach John Kundla's record for most NBA championships won by a head coach in Lakers franchise history. On July 1, 2010, Jackson, after giving it tremendous thought and consulting with his doctors over health concerns, announced that he would return to coach the Lakers for the 2010–11 season.[21] On August 2, 2010, Jackson signed a new contract with the Lakers to return for what he mentioned was "his last stand", meaning the 2010–11 season would be his last. In January 2011, he reiterated that it would be his final season, explaining that in the past there was the possibility that maybe he would reconsider. "This year, there's no maybe", said Jackson.[22] He retired after the Lakers were swept out of the playoffs in the conference semifinals by that season's eventual NBA champions, the Dallas Mavericks, meaning that he would not get a fourth three-peat (after previously achieving that feat in 1993, 1998 and 2002).[23][24] In his final news conference that season, he noted that he did not have much of a relationship with Jerry or Jim Buss, and said, "When I leave here, I don't anticipate Lakers management will call me up and ask my advice."[25] After the Lakers fired Jackson's successor, Mike Brown, early in the 2012–13 season, they first approached Jackson to replace Brown. Jackson requested two days to consider the opening. He believed the Lakers would wait for his response, but the Lakers thought it was understood they would continue their search. The next day, the team talked with Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
and hired him in a unanimous decision by the front office.[26][27][28][29] They felt D'Antoni's fast-paced style of play made him a "great fit" for the team, more suitable than Jackson's structured triangle offense.[26][27][30][31] Jerry Buss' preference has always been for the Lakers to have a wide-open offense.[26] In the two games leading up to D'Antoni's signing, Lakers fans at Staples Center had chanted "We Want Phil!"[26] Executive career[edit] In 2014, Jackson was in discussions for months with the New York Knicks regarding an executive position with the team.[32] On March 18, he was introduced as the president of the Knicks after signing a five-year, $60 million contract.[33][34] On April 21, 2014, over one week after the conclusion of the season, Mike Woodson and his entire staff were fired.[35] The Knicks finished the season with a 37–45 record and finished 9th in the Eastern Conference standings. On June 9, 2014, the Knicks hired Derek Fisher
Derek Fisher
as the head coach. Fisher played under Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
as a Laker and won five championships together. On June 25, 2014, the Knicks traded guard Raymond Felton
Raymond Felton
along with former NBA defensive player of the year Tyson Chandler
Tyson Chandler
to the Dallas Mavericks. In return the Knicks received Shane Larkin, José Calderón, Samuel Dalembert, and Wayne Ellington
Wayne Ellington
along with two picks for the following day's draft. The trade was the first one that he executed as a front office executive. On June 26, as part of the 2014 NBA draft, the Knicks selected Cleanthony Early as the 34th overall pick and Thanasis Antetokounmpo
Thanasis Antetokounmpo
as the 51st overall pick, using the draft picks received in the trade from the Mavericks. The Knicks also acquired Louis Labeyrie, an additional second-round draft pick, after he was traded by the Pacers. On January 7, 2015, the Knicks set a franchise record with 13 straight losses. The Knicks fell 101–91 to the Washington Wizards, giving New York its longest losing streak in the franchise's 69-year history.[36] This record was extended to 16 straight losses after the NBA Global Games loss against the Milwaukee Bucks
Milwaukee Bucks
in London. They ended the season with a record of 17–65, which is the worst record in franchise history. On June 25, 2015, The Knicks drafted Latvian Kristaps Porziņģis
Kristaps Porziņģis
with the fourth overall pick in the 2015 NBA draft;[37][38] he signed his rookie-scale contract with the Knicks on July 30, 2015.[39] On that same night, the Knicks traded Tim Hardaway Jr.
Tim Hardaway Jr.
for the 19th pick in the draft, which would become Jerian Grant.[40] Porziņģis was an NBA All-Rookie First Team selection for the 2016 season. In the 2017 NBA Draft, Jackson's last NBA Draft with the Knicks, he selected French Point Guard Frank Ntilikina. In the second round, Jackson selected Damyean Dotson
Damyean Dotson
and Ognjen Jaramaz. On June 28, 2017, the Knicks officially announced a mutual decision to part ways with Jackson.[41] The speculated reasoning for the parting of ways was Jackson's attempted buying-out of Carmelo Anthony, and very public strife with Porzingis[42]. Jackson's position would be replaced by his former subordinate Steve Mills. Awards[edit]

This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (June 2010)

In 1996, Jackson won the NBA Coach of the Year Award. In the same year he was named one of the ten greatest NBA coaches of all time by vote in an unranked compilation.[7][9] At the time he was in his 8th year coaching; in the seven years prior he coached 574 games and won 414, with only 160 losses, and had a win-loss percentage of 72.1% – the highest of any coach on the list at that time. He continued his success in his later career; cumulative careers in perspective, he retains the highest win-loss percentage of any coach on this list at 70.4% (1155 wins, 485 losses).[4] In 2002 and 2010 the United States Sports Academy awarded Jackson the Amos Alonzo Stagg
Amos Alonzo Stagg
Coaching Award.[43][44] Head coaching record[edit] Jackson has had a winning record every year as a head coach, and currently has the highest winning percentage of any Hall of Fame coach, and further the highest of any NBA coach coaching 500 games or more. Along with his NBA-record eleven championships, he is the only coach to win at least ten championships in any of North America's major professional sports. At the end of the 2010 season he had the fifth most wins of any NBA coach, and was one of only six to have over 1,000 wins. Of those six he was the only one who had not coached over 1,900 games, and likewise the only one not included in the top ten total games coached.[45]

Legend

Regular season G Games coached W Games won L Games lost W–L % Win–loss %

Post season PG Playoff games PW Playoff wins PL Playoff losses PW–L % Playoff win–loss %

Team Year G W L W–L% Finish PG PW PL PW–L% Result

Chicago 1989–90 82 55 27 .671 2nd in Central 16 10 6 .625 Lost in Conf. Finals

Chicago 1990–91 82 61 21 .744 1st in Central 17 15 2 .882 Won NBA Championship

Chicago 1991–92 82 67 15 .817 1st in Central 22 15 7 .682 Won NBA Championship

Chicago 1992–93 82 57 25 .695 1st in Central 19 15 4 .789 Won NBA Championship

Chicago 1993–94 82 55 27 .671 2nd in Central 10 6 4 .600 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Chicago 1994–95 82 47 35 .573 3rd in Central 10 5 5 .500 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Chicago 1995–96 82 72 10 .878 1st in Central 18 15 3 .833 Won NBA Championship

Chicago 1996–97 82 69 13 .841 1st in Central 19 15 4 .789 Won NBA Championship

Chicago 1997–98 82 62 20 .756 1st in Central 21 15 6 .714 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 1999–00 82 67 15 .817 1st in Pacific 23 15 8 .652 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 2000–01 82 56 26 .683 1st in Pacific 16 15 1 .938 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 2001–02 82 58 24 .707 2nd in Pacific 19 15 4 .789 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 2002–03 82 50 32 .610 2nd in Pacific 12 6 6 .500 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

L.A. Lakers 2003–04 82 56 26 .683 1st in Pacific 22 13 9 .591 Lost in NBA Finals

L.A. Lakers 2005–06 82 45 37 .549 3rd in Pacific 7 3 4 .429 Lost in First Round

L.A. Lakers 2006–07 82 42 40 .512 2nd in Pacific 5 1 4 .200 Lost in First Round

L.A. Lakers 2007–08 82 57 25 .695 1st in Pacific 21 14 7 .667 Lost in NBA Finals

L.A. Lakers 2008–09 82 65 17 .793 1st in Pacific 23 16 7 .696 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 2009–10 82 57 25 .695 1st in Pacific 23 16 7 .696 Won NBA Championship

L.A. Lakers 2010–11 82 57 25 .695 1st in Pacific 10 4 6 .400 Lost in Conf. Semifinals

Career

1,640 1,155 485 .704

333 229 104 .688

Personal life[edit] Jackson has five children (Brooke, Chelsea, Elizabeth, Ben, and Charlie) and eight grandchildren.[46][47] He married his first wife, Maxine, in 1967. They divorced in 1972. He married his second wife, June, in 1974, but they also divorced.[48] He dated Jeanie Buss, the daughter of Lakers owner Jerry Buss, whom he met in 1999.[49] The two became engaged in 2013.[50] On December 27, 2016, they announced the termination of their engagement in a joint statement on Twitter. Jackson owns homes in Playa del Rey, Los Angeles, and Lakeside, Montana.[51] While he was coach of the Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
he lived in Bannockburn.[52] Jackson has admitted to using marijuana and LSD
LSD
in the past.[53] In 2010, he said he did not believe that prisons should be filled with people prosecuted for marijuana, but called California's Proposition 19, which would have legalized marijuana, poorly written.[54] Jackson was diagnosed with prostate cancer in March 2011. He told the Lakers players in May 2011, when they were involved in a second-round playoff series against the Mavericks. Jackson decided to delay his surgery until after the playoffs.[55] Books[edit]

Jackson, Phil; George Kalinsky (1970). Take It All!. ISBN 0-02-029190-6.  Jackson, Phil; Charley Rosen (1975). Maverick. ISBN 0-87223-439-8.  Jackson, Phil; Hugh Delehanty (1995). Sacred Hoops: Spiritual Lessons of a Hardwood Warrior. ISBN 0-7868-6206-8.  Jackson, Phil; Charley Rosen (2001). More than a Game. ISBN 1-58322-060-7.  Jackson, Phil; Michael Arkush (2004). The Last Season: A Team in Search of Its Soul. ISBN 1-59420-035-1.  Jackson, Phil (2009). The Los Angeles Lakers: 50 Amazing Years in the City of Angels. ISBN 0-9823242-0-0.  (foreword only; text is taken from the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
archives) Jackson, Phil (2010). Journey to the Ring: Behind the Scenes with the 2010 NBA Champion Lakers. ISBN 0-9823242-2-7.  Jackson, Phil (2013). Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success. ISBN 9781594205118. 

See also[edit]

National Basketball Association
National Basketball Association
portal

List of NBA championship head coaches

References[edit]

^ Ramona Shelburne (May 10, 2011). "Tense moments in Lakers' last stand". ESPN. Retrieved January 4, 2013.  ^ "Basketball Court Zen". PBS NewsHour. Retrieved August 1, 2015.  ^ "RealGM: Wiretap Archives: Jackson And Williams Lead HOF Class". Archived from the original on April 28, 2007.  ^ a b "Top 10 Coaches in NBA History". NBA.com. Retrieved August 29, 2009.  ^ "Top 10 Coaches in NBA History". NBA.com. Retrieved July 31, 2015. ^ Broussard, Chris. (June 16, 2009). "X marks the spot of greatest NBA coach". ESPN. Retrieved July 31, 2015. ^ a b Dan Callagy. "Red Auerbach-Phil Jackson: Who's the Best NBA Coach of All Time?". Bleacher Report. Retrieved December 20, 2014.  ^ Neil, Greenberg. (February 10, 2015). " Gregg Popovich
Gregg Popovich
second to Phil Jackson as NBA’s best coach". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 31, 2015. ^ a b "Top 10 NBA coaches of all time". (February 10, 2011). Fox Sports. Retrieved July 31, 2015. ^ Scott Cacciola, " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
Is Out as Knicks President," New York Times, June 28, 2017. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Halberstam, David (1999). Playing for Keeps: Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
and the World He Made. New York: Random House. pp. 252–53. ISBN 0-679-41562-9.  ^ Burnes, Jerry. (May 14, 2013). " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
is coming home". Williston Herald. Retrieved August 11, 2015. ^ Facts and History Archived January 6, 2007, at the Wayback Machine., Sigma Alpha Epsilon. ^ 1974–75 NBA Player Register, basketball-reference.com ^ Adamek, Steve; and Iannazzone, Al. "Lakers Notebook", The Record (Bergen County), June 5, 2002. Accessed March 30, 2011. "Phil Jackson's memories of New Jersey are fond and forgetful. He finished his playing career with the Nets when they played their home games at Rutgers, about an hour trip from where he lived in Leonia." ^ "Former K-State basketball star dies at 72". ABC News. KTKA.com. February 22, 2007. Retrieved October 2, 2007.  ^ "Candidates for the 2007 Class of the FIBA Hall of Fame announced". Canada Basketball. May 25, 2007. Archived from the original on February 12, 2008. Retrieved October 2, 2007.  ^ "The head Bull rides off into the sunset". CNN.com. Associated Press. June 22, 1998. Retrieved July 9, 2011.  ^ a b Lazenby 2006, p.423 ^ "Bryant, Artest rally Lakers to 16th championship". ESPN. June 17, 2010. Retrieved June 17, 2010.  ^ Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
returning to coach Lakers next season Yahoo! Sports. July 1, 2010. Accessed July 5, 2010. ^ McMenamin, Dave (February 28, 2011). " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
still plans to retire". ESPNLosAngeles.com. Archived from the original on February 12, 2011.  ^ Howard-Cooper, Scott (May 11, 2011). " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
is Retired ... Maybe". NBA.com. Retrieved May 15, 2011.  ^ Kotloff, Brian (April 28, 2013). "Report: Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
was diagnosed with prostate cancer in March 2011". SI.com. Archived from the original on May 27, 2013.  ^ Heisler, Mark (November 10, 2012). "Phil Jackson's tenure produced the most success and fun we've ever seen". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 13, 2012.  ^ a b c d Bresnahan, Mike (November 13, 2012). "Kupchak: If Phil Jackson hadn't hesitated he might be Lakers coach". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 14, 2012.  ^ a b McMenamin, Dave (November 13, 2012). "Kupchak: Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
a better fit". ESPN. Archived from the original on November 14, 2012.  ^ Bresnahan, Mike (November 12, 2012). " Mike D'Antoni
Mike D'Antoni
to be next coach of the Lakers". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 12, 2012.  ^ Beck, Howard (November 12, 2012). "The Lakers Change Direction and Hire D'Antoni as Coach". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 12, 2012.  ^ Bresnahan, Mike (November 12, 2012). " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
gets call from Lakers and it's not what he expected". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on November 13, 2012.  ^ Ding, Kevin (November 12, 2012). "Lakers' fast break away from Jackson opens door for D'Antoni". Orange County Register. Archived from the original on November 13, 2012.  ^ Shelburne, Ramona; Broussard, Chris (March 14, 2014). "Phil Jackson signs with Knicks". ESPN. Archived from the original on March 14, 2014.  ^ " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
Named President of New York Knicks". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. March 18, 2014. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014. Retrieved March 18, 2014.  ^ "Zen Era: Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
Introduced As Knicks President At MSG". newyork.cbslocal.com/. March 18, 2014. Archived from the original on March 18, 2014.  ^ Begley, Ian. "Knicks fire entire coaching staff". Article. ESPN. Retrieved 21 April 2014.  ^ Knicks set record with 13th straight loss, 101-91 to Wizards ^ "With The No. 4 Pick, The Knicks Select Kristaps Porzingis". NBA.com. June 25, 2015. Retrieved June 26, 2015.  ^ Berman, Marc (26 June 2015). "Knicks take Euro stud Kristaps Porzingis with No. 4 pick". nypost.com. Retrieved 26 June 2015.  ^ "Knicks Sign Kristaps Porzingis and Jerian Grant". NBA.com. July 30, 2015. Retrieved July 30, 2015.  ^ Begley, Ian. "Knicks ship Tim Hardaway Jr.
Tim Hardaway Jr.
to Hawks for Jerian Grant rights". ESPN. ESPN.  ^ "Phil Jackson, New York Knicks
New York Knicks
Agree to Part Company". NBA.com. June 28, 2017. Retrieved June 28, 2017.  ^ https://www.si.com/nba/2017/06/28/phil-jackson-fired-new-york-knicks-james-dolan-kristaps-porzingis-carmelo-anthony ^ Tuesday July 17, 2007 (2007-07-17). "Donovan Presented With United States Sports Academy Coaching Award". GatorZone.com. Retrieved 2012-09-06.  ^ " Amos Alonzo Stagg
Amos Alonzo Stagg
Coaching Award". ASAMA – The American Sport Art Museum and Archives. Archived from the original on May 3, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2012.  ^ "NBA.com: All-Time Regular Season Victories-Coaches". Nba.com. Retrieved December 20, 2014.  ^ Goudreau, Jenna. "LA Lakers' Jeanie Buss
Jeanie Buss
Doesn't Play By The Rules". Forbes.  ^ MacMullan, Jackie (November 14, 2016). "Phil Jackson: 'I'm going to follow the plan, and if it doesn't work out, it will be evident'". ESPN. Retrieved 28 December 2016.  ^ David L. Porter. Basketball: A Biographical Dictionary. Greenwood, 2005. 231. ^ " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
and Jeanie Buss
Jeanie Buss
getting married?". USA Today. January 4, 2013. Retrieved March 3, 2013.  ^ Malinowski, Erik. " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
Has Put A Ginormous Diamond Engagement Ring On Jeanie Buss' Hand". Deadspin.  ^ " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
is definitely ready for retirement". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved December 20, 2014.  ^ Phil Jackson's house (former) in Bannockburn, IL (Google Maps) - Virtual Globetrotting Retrieved 2017-02-25. ^ Lazenby, Roland (2007). Mindgames: Phil Jackson's Long Strange Journey. U of Nebraska Press. p. 6. ISBN 9780803259980. Retrieved September 6, 2012.  ^ " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
on Prop. 19: Legislation 'Poorly Written'". Slam Online. 2010-11-03. Retrieved 2012-09-06.  ^ " Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
had cancer during 2011 playoffs". Yahoo! Sports. 2013-04-28. Retrieved 2013-04-28. 

Further reading[edit]

Lazenby, Roland (2006). The Show: The Inside Story of the Spectacular Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
in the Words of Those Who Lived It. New York City: McGraw-Hill Professional. ISBN 978-0-07-143034-0. Retrieved April 18, 2011. 

External links[edit]

Wikiquote has quotations related to: Phil Jackson

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Phil Jackson.

Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
at the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
player file at the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
(archived December 2, 2010) at NBA.com Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
coach profile at the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
(archived December 1, 2010) at NBA.com NBA career stats as a coach at Basketball-Reference NBA career stats as a player at Basketball-Reference Phil Jackson
Phil Jackson
on IMDb

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(1979–1982) Phil Johnson # (1982) Rod Thorn
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(#) denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Los Angeles Lakers
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head coaches

John Kundla (1948–1958) George Mikan
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(1960–1967) Butch van Breda Kolff (1967–1969) Joe Mullaney (1969–1971) Bill Sharman
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(2004–2005) Frank Hamblen
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v t e

New York Knicks
New York Knicks
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New York Knicks
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1972–73 NBA champions

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Chicago Bulls
1990–91 NBA champions

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Chicago Bulls
Chicago Bulls
1991–92 NBA champions

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Chicago Bulls
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1992–93 NBA champions

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Jackson

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Chicago Bulls
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1995–96 NBA champions

0 Brown 7 Kukoč 9 Harper 13 Longley 22 Salley 23 Jordan (Finals MVP) 25 Kerr 30 Buechler 33 Pippen 34 Wennington 53 Edwards 91 Rodman

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Assistant coaches Winter Rodgers Cleamons Paxson

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Chicago Bulls
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1996–97 NBA champions

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Chicago Bulls
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1997–98 NBA champions

1 Brown 7 Kukoč 8 Simpkins 9 Harper 13 Longley 23 Jordan (Finals MVP) 24 Burrell 25 Kerr 30 Buechler 33 Pippen 34 Wennington 91 Rodman

Head coach
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Assistant coaches Winter Cartwright Rodgers Hamblen

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Los Angeles Lakers
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1999–2000 NBA champions

2 Fisher 3 George 4 Harper 5 Horry 8 Bryant 10 Lue 11 Celestand 16 Salley 17 Fox 20 Shaw 34 O'Neal (Finals MVP) 40 Knight 41 Rice 45 Green

Head coach
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Assistant coaches Winter Hamblen Cleamons Bertka

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Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Lakers
2000–01 NBA champions

2 Fisher 3 George 4 Harper 5 Horry 7 Rider 8 Bryant 10 Lue 12 Penberthy 14 Medvedenko 17 Fox 20 Shaw 34 O'Neal (Finals MVP) 35 Madsen 40 Foster 54 Grant

Head coach
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Assistant coaches Winter Hamblen Cleamons

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Los Angeles Lakers
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2001–02 NBA champions

2 Fisher 3 George 5 Horry 6 McCoy 8 Bryant 10 Hunter 14 Medvedenko 17 Fox 20 Shaw 23 Richmond 34 O'Neal (Finals MVP) 35 Madsen 52 Walker

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Assistant coaches Winter Hamblen Cleamons Rambis

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1967 NBA draft

First round

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Second round

Jimmy Jones Steve Sullivan Byron Beck Randolph Mahaffey Phil Jackson Bob Netolicky Bob Rule

v t e

NBA Coach of the Year Award

1963: Gallatin 1964: Hannum 1965: Auerbach 1966: Schayes 1967: J. Kerr 1968: Guerin 1969: Shue 1970: Holzman 1971: Motta 1972: Sharman 1973: Heinsohn 1974: R. Scott 1975: P. Johnson 1976: Fitch 1977: Nissalke 1978: H. Brown 1979: Fitzsimmons 1980: Fitch 1981: McKinney 1982: Shue 1983: Nelson 1984: Layden 1985: Nelson 1986: Fratello 1987: Schuler 1988: Moe 1989: Fitzsimmons 1990: Riley 1991: Chaney 1992: Nelson 1993: Riley 1994: Wilkens 1995: Harris 1996: Jackson 1997: Riley 1998: Bird 1999: Dunleavy 2000: Rivers 2001: L. Brown 2002: Carlisle 2003: Popovich 2004: H. Brown 2005: D'Antoni 2006: A. Johnson 2007: Mitchell 2008: B. Scott 2009: M. Brown 2010: Brooks 2011: Thibodeau 2012: Popovich 2013: Karl 2014: Popovich 2015: Budenholzer 2016: S. Kerr 2017: D'Antoni

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v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

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New York Knicks

Founded in 1946 Based in New York City, New York

Franchise

Franchise All-time roster Draft history Head coaches Seasons Current season

Arenas

Madison Square Garden
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III 69th Regiment Armory Madison Square Garden
Madison Square Garden
IV

Personnel

Owner The Madison Square Garden
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Company President Steve Mills General manager Scott Perry Head coach Jeff Hornacek

Culture

Dancing Harry Eddie Spike Lee Diedrich Knickerbocker Whatever Happened to Micheal Ray? Mike Walczewski George Kalinsky

Lore

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Boston Celtics Brooklyn Nets Chicago
Chicago
Bulls Indiana Pacers Miami Heat

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10 12 15 15 19 22 24 33 613

NBA G League
NBA G League
affiliate

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1970 1973

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1951 1952 1953 1970 1972 1973 1994 1999

Division titles (5)

1971 1989 1993 1994 2013

Media

TV MSG Network Radio WEPN-FM Announcers Mike Breen Walt Frazier Kenny Albert Mike Crispino

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Chicago
Chicago
Bulls

Founded in 1966 Based in Chicago, Illinois

Franchise

Franchise Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Broadcasters Head coaches Current season

Arenas

International Amphitheatre Chicago
Chicago
Stadium United Center

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Owner: Jerry Reinsdorf Vice president of basketball operations: John Paxson General manager: Gar Forman Head coach: Fred Hoiberg

Culture

Air Jordan

Jumpman

Tommy Edwards Benny the Bull "Sirius" Ray Clay Jordan Rules Triangle offense Ashland Green/Pink Line Station Tex Winter The Spirit ( Michael Jordan
Michael Jordan
statue)

Lore

Phantom Buzzer Game The Shot Disputed foul against Scottie Pippen 72–10 Michael Jordan's last shot

Rivals

Cleveland Cavaliers Detroit Pistons Miami Heat New York Knicks

Retired numbers

4 10 23 33 Coach General Manager

G League affiliate

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NBA Championships (6)

1991 1992 1993 1996 1997 1998

Eastern Conference Championships (6)

1991 1992 1993 1996 1997 1998

Division titles (9)

1975 1991 1992 1993 1996 1997 1998 2011 2012

Hall of Famers

George Gervin Artis Gilmore Phil Jackson Michael Jordan Robert Parish Scottie Pippen Dennis Rodman Jerry Sloan Nate Thurmond Tex Winter Jerry Reinsdorf

Media

TV WGN (through WGN Sports) NBC Sports Chicago CN100 Radio WSCR Announcers Neil Funk Stacey King Chuck Swirsky Bill Wennington

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 60794687 LCCN: n95066229 ISNI: 0000 0000 3172 319X SUDOC: 073152021 BNF: cb16937327q (data) NDL: 00540

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