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Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation (三菱商事株式会社, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shōji Kabushiki-gaisha) is Japan's largest trading company (sogo shosha) and a member of the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
keiretsu. Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation employs over 60,000 people and has seven business segments, including finance, banking, energy, machinery, chemicals and food.

Contents

1 History 2 Operations 3 Awards 4 Environmental record 5 External links 6 References

History[edit] The company traces its roots to the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
conglomerate founded by Yataro Iwasaki. Iwasaki was originally employed by the Tosa clan of modern-day Kōchi Prefecture, who posted him to Nagasaki
Nagasaki
in the 1860s. During this time, Iwasaki became close to Sakamoto Ryōma, a major figure in the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
that ended the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
and restored the primacy of the emperor of Japan
Japan
in 1867. Iwasaki was placed in charge of the Tosa clan's trading operation, Tsukumo Shokai, based in Osaka. This company changed its name in the following years to Mitsukawa Shokai and then to Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shokai. Around 1871, the company was renamed Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Steamship Company and began a mail service between Yokohama and Shanghai with government sponsorship.[2] Under Iwasaki's leadership in the late 1800s, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
diversified its business into insurance ( Tokio Marine Insurance Company
Tokio Marine Insurance Company
and Meiji Life Insurance Company), mining (Takashima Coal
Coal
Mine) and shipbuilding.[2] Following his death in 1885, his successor Yanosuke Iwasaki merged the shipping operation with a rival enterprise to form the Nippon Yusen Kaisha
Nippon Yusen Kaisha
(NYK) and refocused Mitsubishi's business on coal and copper mining. In 1918, the group's international trading business was spun off to form Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shoji Kaisha.[3] Mitsubishi Goshi Kaisha served as the parent company of the group through World War II, during which group company Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Heavy Industries (launched in 1934) produced ships, aircraft and heavy machinery for the war effort.[4] After the war, the administration of Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
called for the dissolution of the "zaibatsu" corporations that dominated the Japanese economy. Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
was the only major zaibatsu to initially refuse this request, at the orders of president Kotaya Iwasaki, who shortly thereafter fell seriously ill.[4] Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
eventually dissolved in 1947, and under restrictive rules imposed by the occupation authorities, the employees of the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shoji trading arm rebanded into 100 separate companies. Beginning in 1950, the restrictions on re-consolidation of the zaibatsu were eased, and by 1952 most of the former Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shoji had coalesced into three companies.[5] The current Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation was founded by the merger of these three companies to form Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shoji in 1954; Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
listed on the Tokyo
Tokyo
Stock Exchange and Osaka
Osaka
Stock Exchange in the same year. It changed its name to " Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation" in 1971.[6] Concurrently with its relaunch, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
opened fourteen liaison offices outside Japan, as well as a US subsidiary called Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
International Corporation with offices in New York and San Francisco. By 1960, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
had fifty-one overseas offices.[7] Mitsubishi's first large-scale investment outside Japan
Japan
was a liquefied natural gas project in Brunei, committed to in 1968.[6] Along with Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Bank, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation played a central role in international trading for other constituents of the former Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
zaibatsu during the postwar era, such as Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Heavy Industries and the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Motor Company, forming a major keiretsu business group centered around the Second Friday Conference (Kinyo-kai) of company managers.[8] Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
was the largest Japanese general trading company from the late 1960s until the mid 1980s; after falling to fifth place in 1986, it embarked on a series of large overseas acquisitions together with other companies in the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
group.[8] By 2015 Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
was again the top-ranked general trading company by net earnings. However, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
saw its first postwar net loss in the fiscal year ended March 2016, amid a slowdown in the Chinese economy and a slump in the commodity markets, causing Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
to lose its #1 position to Itochu.[9] Operations[edit] Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation has its head office in Marunouchi, Chiyoda, Tokyo.[10] The head office is located in two buildings in Marunouchi: Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shoji Building (三菱商事ビル, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shōji Biru) and Marunouchi Park Building
Marunouchi Park Building
(丸の内パークビル, Marunouchi Pāku Biru).[11] Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation businesses are divided into eight business sections:

Business Service Group: Focuses on information technology. Mitsubishi is the Japanese partner of Tata Consultancy Services
Tata Consultancy Services
and operates a data center in Mitaka, Tokyo.[12] Global Environmental & Infrastructure Business Group: Handles transportation, water, electricity and industrial projects. Its infrastructure projects include airports in Mandalay and Ulaanbataar, urban railways in Cairo, Doha and Dubai, and power projects under the Diamond Generating and Diamond Transmission names.[13] In 2015, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
announced a strategic alliance with Turkey's Çalık Enerji to boost its infrastructure business in Turkey and Northern Africa.[14] Industrial Finance, Logistics and Development Group: Engages in asset management, asset financing, real estate and logistics.[15] Energy
Energy
Business Group: Handles trading and investment in crude oil, liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, shale gas, biofuel and other energy commodities in various countries.[16] Metals Group: Develops concessions and trades in coal, iron ore, nickel, chrome, copper, aluminum, uranium and platinum.[17] In 2014, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
opened a $3.4 billion coking coal mine in Caval Ridge, Queensland, Australia, in a 50/50 joint venture with BHP Billiton.[18] Machinery
Machinery
Group: Sells heavy machinery, ships, defense equipment and motor vehicles (particularly for Isuzu).[19] Chemicals
Chemicals
Group: Manufactures and trades in a wide variety of commodity and functional chemicals, especially petrochemicals.[20] Living Essentials Group: Develops and trades in consumer products and manages retailing operations; investor in Lawson and Alfamart.[21]

Of these segments, energy is the largest by far, accounting for almost half of the company's consolidated net income in the first half of fiscal year 2015.[22] Awards[edit] In 2008 Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation was crowned In-House of the Year - Trading Company In-House Team of the Year at the 2008 ALB Japan
Japan
Law Awards.[23] Environmental record[edit]

The neutrality of this article is disputed. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please do not remove this message until conditions to do so are met. (September 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

This article's factual accuracy is disputed. Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help to ensure that disputed statements are reliably sourced. (September 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

In March 1998 the Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation received the quarterly Greenwash Award. It was awarded to Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation for successful efforts at portraying its business operations as environmentally friendly. Through the use of public relations the corporation demonstrated to the world that their subsidiaries facility off the coast of Mexico was environmentally benign. The facility is a salt evaporation factory and is in a lagoon that also holds a Grey Whale calving ground.[24] As of 2009, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
held between 35% to 40% of the worldwide market for bluefin tuna.[25][26] Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
was also the subject of a boycott by the Rainforest Action Network for its role in the destruction of rainforests through its forestry activities.[27] External links[edit]

Official website

References[edit]

^ a b c d e "Financial Results for Fiscal Year Ended March 31, 2011" (PDF). Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. May 10, 2011.  ^ a b "Timeline of the Life & Times of Yataro Iwasaki". Mitsubishi Corporation. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ "Yanosuke Expands Mitsubishi's Involvement in Mining". Mitsubishi Corporation. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ a b "Koyata Iwasaki—Standing by His Convictions to the Very End". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ "The Launch of the New Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Shoji: President Takagaki Urges Fairness in Business". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ a b "Corporate History". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ "Laying the Foundations for Success by Expanding the Company's Global Network". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ a b "History of Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation". International Directory of Company Histories, Vol. 12. St. James Press, 1996. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ "商社で利益首位どう奪回? 三菱商事社長 垣内威彦氏 出資先1000社と共に成長". The Nikkei. 5 June 2016. Retrieved 15 June 2016.  ^ "Company Fact Sheet". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved September 28, 2011.  ^ " Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Office: Access Details". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved September 28, 2011.  ^ "Business Service Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Archived from the original on 3 July 2015. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ "Global Environmental & Infrastructure Business Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ Humber, Yuriy (4 June 2015). " Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corp Invests in Turkey's Calik to Win Energy
Energy
Orders". Bloomberg L.P. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ "Industrial Finance, Logistics & Development Group". Mitsubishi Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ " Energy
Energy
Business Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ "Metals Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ Iwata, Mari (13 October 2014). "BHP, Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Open New Coal
Coal
Mine Amid Market Slump". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ " Machinery
Machinery
Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ " Chemicals
Chemicals
Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ "Living Essentials Group". Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
Corporation. Retrieved 5 June 2015.  ^ "Results for Six Months Ended September 2014" (PDF). Mitsubishi Corporation. 11 November 2014. Retrieved 22 January 2015.  ^ " Japan
Japan
Law Awards 2008". Asian Legal Business. Thomson Reuters (8.5): 32. May 2008. Retrieved April 12, 2014 – via Issuu.  ^ Joshua Karliner (March 1, 1998). " Mitsubishi
Mitsubishi
and Laguna San Ignacio". CorpWatch. Retrieved September 26, 2014.  ^ Martin Hickman (June 3, 2009). "Revealed: the bid to corner world's bluefin tuna market". The Independent. Retrieved February 24, 2012.  ^ "Bluefin Tuna overfished bought and paid for by Mitsubishi". YouTube. Retrieved September 26, 2014.  ^ Manheim, Jarol (2000). "Chapter 5". Death of A Thousand Cuts: Corporate Campaigns and the Attack on the Corporation. Routledge. pp. 93–98. ISBN 978-1-135-64857-2. 

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