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Mitchell Joseph Landrieu[1] (/ˈlændruː/ LAN-drew;[2] born August 16, 1960) is an American politician and lawyer who has been Mayor of New Orleans
New Orleans
since 2010. A Democrat, Landrieu served as Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana
Louisiana
from 2004 to 2010 prior to becoming mayor. He is the son of former New Orleans
New Orleans
mayor and Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Moon Landrieu
Moon Landrieu
and the brother of former U.S. Senator Mary Landrieu. In 2007, he won a second term as lieutenant governor in the October 20, 2007 nonpartisan blanket primary by defeating two Republicans: State Representative Gary J. Beard and Sammy Kershaw. He was elected Mayor of New Orleans
New Orleans
on February 6, 2010, garnering 66 percent of the citywide vote and claiming victory in 365 of the city's 366 voting precincts. He was reelected mayor on February 1, 2014, with nearly 64 percent of the vote in a three-candidate field.[3]

Contents

1 Early life 2 Political career

2.1 Legislator 2.2 1994 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election 2.3 Lieutenant governor 2.4 2006 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election 2.5 2010 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election 2.6 Mayor of New Orleans

3 Spike Lee
Spike Lee
documentary 4 Humanitarian causes 5 Election history 6 References 7 External links

Early life[edit] Landrieu was born and raised in the Broadmoor neighborhood of New Orleans, the fifth of nine children of Maurice "Moon" and Verna Satterlee Landrieu. After graduating from Jesuit High School in 1978, he enrolled at The Catholic University of America
The Catholic University of America
in Washington, D.C. where he majored in political science and theatre. In 1985, he earned a Juris Doctor
Juris Doctor
(J.D.) degree from Loyola University Law School in New Orleans. Landrieu is married to Cheryl P. Landrieu, also an attorney. The couple has five children. Landrieu has been a practicing attorney for fifteen years and was president of International Mediation & Arbitration, Ltd. He is a member of the Supreme Court Task Force on Alternative Dispute Resolution which was responsible for developing the pilot mediation program in Orleans Parish. Landrieu is trained in mediation and negotiation by the Harvard Law School
Harvard Law School
Negotiation Project, the American Arbitration Association, and the Attorney Mediator's Institute. Landrieu has also taught alternative dispute resolution as an adjunct professor at Loyola University Law School. Political career[edit] Legislator[edit] Landrieu was elected to the Louisiana House of Representatives
Louisiana House of Representatives
in 1987, where he served for sixteen years in the seat previously held by his sister and before her, his father. Landrieu led the legislative effort to reform Louisiana's juvenile justice system with a focus on rehabilitation and reform as opposed to punishment and incarceration. As lieutenant governor, he continued to chair the Juvenile Justice Commission, the entity created by the legislation to implement the reforms. In January 2004, Governor Kathleen Blanco
Kathleen Blanco
endorsed the Commission's recommendations. Landrieu also led the effort by a coalition of artists, venue owners, and other interested parties who were successful in repealing the Orleans Parish
Orleans Parish
"amusement tax", a 2% tax on gross sales at any establishment that features live music. As an attorney, Landrieu brought a case to court that resulted in the tax being ruled unconstitutional. He continued the fight by bringing the issue to the New Orleans
New Orleans
City Council, who voted to repeal the tax. As a legislator, Landrieu sponsored a bill to repeal the law that allowed the tax to exist. Landrieu crafted legislation to fund the Louisiana
Louisiana
Cancer Research Consortium of New Orleans, a partnership between the Louisiana
Louisiana
State University and Tulane University
Tulane University
Health Sciences Centers. The cancer center will house state-of-the-art cancer research equipment and laboratories, significant because Louisiana
Louisiana
has the nation's highest cancer mortality rate according to the American Cancer Society. One of Landrieu's most ambitious projects as Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana
Louisiana
has been the creation of the World Cultural Economic Forum (WCEF). The Forum, held annually in New Orleans, is directed towards promoting cultural economic development opportunities through the strategic convening of cultural ambassadors and leaders from around the world. The first WCEF took place in October 2008. He has carried on this project as mayor and has even established a formal cultural economy office at City Hall. 1994 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election[edit] In 1994 Landrieu made an unsuccessful bid for the office of Mayor of New Orleans; the office went to Marc Morial, the son of another former mayor (the contest between sons of former mayors prompted some commentators to joke about establishing a tradition of primogeniture for the city's top office). Lieutenant governor[edit] Mitch Landrieu's 2003 campaign for Lieutenant Governor was his first bid for statewide office in Louisiana. In a field of six candidates, Landrieu garnered 53 percent of the vote and won outright in the Louisiana
Louisiana
open primary, thus avoiding a general election. His principal opponents were three Republicans, former U.S. Representative Clyde C. Holloway
Clyde C. Holloway
of Rapides Parish, former Lieutenant Governor Melinda Schwegmann of New Orleans, and businessman Kirt Bennett of Baton Rouge. 2006 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election[edit]

Main article: New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election, 2006

Landrieu in 2007

In February 2006, Landrieu officially announced he would run for mayor of New Orleans
New Orleans
in the April 22 election. Before Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Katrina
the incumbent Ray Nagin
Ray Nagin
was widely expected to be reelected with little difficulty, but post-disaster problems and controversies had left many New Orleanians interested in new leadership. In the election of April 22, preliminary results showed Landrieu with the second most votes, with 29% of the vote to Nagin's 38%. Nagin and Landrieu faced each other in a run off election on May 20. Had Landrieu won, he would have been the first white mayor of New Orleans since his father left office in 1978. With unofficial results showing 53% of the vote for Nagin, Landrieu conceded defeat shortly before 10:30 pm on election night. 2010 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election[edit] Although Landrieu had at first indicated he did not plan to run for mayor, in December 2009 he announced he would be running in the 2010 New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral election,[4][5] in a bid to succeed Ray Nagin, who was term-limited. Landrieu won with some 67% of the vote, with wide support across racial and demographic lines. His outright victory over 10 challengers in the first round of voting eliminated the need for a runoff election.[6][7] Landrieu is the first white person to hold the post since his father left office in 1978. Mayor of New Orleans[edit] Shortly after taking office as Mayor of New Orleans, Landrieu announced the appointment of Ronal W. Serpas
Ronal W. Serpas
as the new Superintendent of the New Orleans
New Orleans
Police Department until the latter's resignation in August 2014.[8]

Workers secure the Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
statue for removal from Lee Circle, May 19, 2017

In 2015, Landrieu called for the removal from prominent public display of 4 monuments, 3 honoring Confederate leaders and one honoring a short-lived, violent coup of the state government by the Crescent City White League. The New Orleans
New Orleans
City Council approved their removal the same year. After various legal challenges to removal were struck down, on April 24, 2017, the first, the long-contentious Battle of Liberty Place Monument was removed.[9] He was criticized by opponents of its removal for his lack of transparency.[9] The statues of Confederate Generals Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
and P. G. T. Beauregard
P. G. T. Beauregard
as well as Confederate President Jefferson Davis.[10] were removed in May 2017.[11] Spike Lee
Spike Lee
documentary[edit] Landrieu was one of the participants in filmmaker Spike Lee's documentaries When The Levees Broke: A Requiem In Four Acts and If God Is Willing and Da Creek Don't Rise. Humanitarian causes[edit] In 2009 Mitch Landrieu
Mitch Landrieu
became a supporter of The Jazz Foundation of America. He flew to NYC to present Agnes Varis
Agnes Varis
with the coveted "Saint of the Century" Award at the Jazz Foundation of America's annual benefit concert "A Great Night in Harlem" at the Apollo Theater[12] in support of Varis' and the Jazz Foundation's work to help save jazz musicians, especially those affected by Hurricane Katrina. Election history[edit]

State Representative, 90th Representative District, 1987

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, October 24, 1987

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 4,525 (50%) Elected

Lyn "Mrs. Woody" Koppel Democratic 2,973 (33%) Defeated

Others n.a. 1,484 (17%) Defeated

State Representative, 89th Representative District, 1991

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, October 19, 1991

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 8,522 (63%) Elected

Marilyn Thayer Republican 4,939 (37%) Defeated

Mayor of New Orleans, 1994

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, February 5, 1994

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Donald Mintz Democratic 56,305 (37%) Runoff

Marc Morial Democratic 49,604 (32%) Runoff

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 14,689 (10%) Defeated

Others n.a. 32,104 (21%) Defeated

State Representative, 89th Representative District, 1995

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, October 21, 1995

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 6,692 (57%) Elected

Jeff Crouere Jr. Republican 3,049 (26%) Defeated

Others n.a. 2,057 (17%) Defeated

State Representative, 89th Representative District, 1999

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, October 23, 1999

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 6,575 (70%) Elected

Randy Evans Republican 2,765 (30%) Defeated

Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, 2003

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, October 4, 2003

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 674,803 (53%) Elected

Clyde Holloway Republican 249,668 (19%) Defeated

Melinda Schwegmann Republican 215,402 (17%) Defeated

Others n.a. 141,006 (11%) Defeated

Mayor of New Orleans, 2006

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, April 22, 2006

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Ray Nagin Democratic 41,561 (38%) Runoff

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 31,551 (29%) Runoff

Ron Forman Democratic 18,764 (17%) Defeated

Robert "Rob" Couhig Republican 10,312 (10%) Defeated

Others n.a. 6,160 (6%) Defeated

Second Ballot, May 20, 2006

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Ray Nagin Democratic 59,460 (52%) Elected

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 54,131 (48%) Defeated

Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana, 2007

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, October 20, 2007

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 702,320 (57%) Elected

Sammy Kershaw Republican 376,336 (30%) Defeated

Gary Beard Republican 130,978 (11%) Defeated

Others n.a. 31,544 (2%) Defeated

Mayor of New Orleans, 2010

Threshold > 50% First Ballot, February 6, 2010

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 58,276 (66%) Elected

Troy Henry Democratic 12,275 (14%) Defeated

John Georges Democratic 8,189 (9%) Defeated

Robert "Rob" Couhig Republican 4,874 (5%) Defeated

Others n.a.

Defeated

Mayor of New Orleans, 2014

Threshold >50% First Ballot, February 1, 2014

Candidate Affiliation Support Outcome

Mitch Landrieu Democratic 53,441 (64%) Elected

Michael Bagneris Democratic 27,991 (33%) Defeated

Danatus N. King, Sr. Democratic 2,638 (3%) Defeated

References[edit]

^ "Project Vote Smart – Lieutenant Governor Mitchell Joseph 'Mitch' Landrieu – Biography". Votesmart.org. August 16, 1960. Retrieved August 30, 2010.  ^ AP News Pronunciation Guide ^ "Results for Election Date: 2/1/2014". staticresults.sos.la.gov. Retrieved February 3, 2014.  ^ Times-Picayune archive. " Mitch Landrieu
Mitch Landrieu
to enter New Orleans
New Orleans
mayoral race, sources say". NOLA.com. Retrieved August 30, 2010.  ^ "With a change of heart, Landrieu jumps into crowded mayor's race New Orleans
New Orleans
News, Local News, Breaking News, Weather wwltv.com Political News". wwltv.com. Archived from the original on December 19, 2009. Retrieved August 30, 2010.  ^ "Demographer calls Mayor for Lieutenant Governor Mitch Landrieu". NOLA. Retrieved February 7, 2010.  ^ " Mitch Landrieu
Mitch Landrieu
claims New Orleans
New Orleans
mayor's office in a landslide". NOLA. Retrieved February 7, 2010.  ^ "Supt. Ronal Serpas steps down at NOPD (WWLTV.com article)". August 18, 2014. Archived from the original on August 20, 2014. Retrieved October 10, 2014.  ^ a b Adelson, Jeff; Nowak, Jeff (April 24, 2017). "After removing Liberty Place monument, Mitch Landrieu: Others coming down 'sooner rather than later'". The New Orleans
New Orleans
Advocate. Retrieved April 26, 2017.  ^ "New Orleans' Confederate monuments 'aberration ... denial of our history,' Mitch Landrieu
Mitch Landrieu
says". The New Orleans
New Orleans
Advocate. April 24, 2017. Retrieved April 26, 2017.  ^ [1] ^ [2] Archived May 21, 2009, at the Wayback Machine.

External links[edit]

New Orleans
New Orleans
portal Louisiana
Louisiana
portal Biography portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mitch Landrieu.

Official website CityMayors profile Appearances on C-SPAN

Louisiana
Louisiana
House of Representatives

Preceded by Mary Landrieu Member of the Louisiana
Louisiana
House of Representatives from the 90th district 1988–1992 Succeeded by Pete Schneider

Preceded by James St. Raymond Member of the Louisiana
Louisiana
House of Representatives from the 89th district 1992–2004 Succeeded by Timothy Burns

Political offices

Preceded by Kathleen Blanco Lieutenant Governor of Louisiana 2004–2010 Succeeded by Scott Angelle

Preceded by Ray Nagin Mayor of New Orleans 2010–present Incumbent

v t e

Lieutenant Governors of Louisiana

Landry Plauché Farmer Wickliffe C. Mouton Griffin Hyams Pearce Wells Voorhies Dunn Pinchback Antoine Wiltz McEnery Robertson Walton Knobloch Jeffries Parlange Lott Snyder Estopinal Cage Sanders Lambremont Barret F. Mouton Bouanchaud Johnson Simpson Gilbert Cyr Fournet Wingate Noe Long Lindsey M. Mouton Verret Dodd Barham Frazar Aycock Fitzmorris Freeman Hardy Schwegmann Blanco Landrieu Angelle Dardenne Nungesser

v t e

Mayors of New Orleans, Louisiana

Boré Petit Pitot Watkins Mather Trudeau Girod Dorgenois Girod Macarty Roffignac Prieur Bertus Genois Freret Prieur Bertus Freret Montegut Crossman Lewis Waterman Summers Stith Monroe Shepley Weitzel French Weitzel Deming Miller Durell Miller Hoyt Kennedy Quincy Burke Kennedy Rozier Clark Monroe Heath Conway Flanders Wiltz Leeds Pilsbury Patton Shakspeare Behan Guillotte Shakspeare Fitzpatrick Flower Capdevielle Behrman McShane Behrman O'Keefe Walmsley Pratt Earhart Cave Maestri Morrison Schiro M. E. Landrieu E. Morial Barthelemy M. Morial Nagin M. J. Landrieu Cantrell (elect)

v t e

Mayors of cities with populations exceeding 100,000 in Louisiana

Mitch Landrieu
Mitch Landrieu
(D) (New Orleans) Sharon Weston Broome (D) (Baton Rouge) Ollie Tyler (D) (Shreveport) Joel Robideaux (R) (Lafayette)

v t e

Presidents of the United States Conference of Mayors

Murphy Curley Walmsley Hoan La Guardia Kelly Welsh Green Lawrence Kennelly Burke Robinson Hynes Wagner Poulson R. J. Daley Dilworth Burns Celebrezze Lee Selland Tucker Blaisdell Cavanagh Barr Schrunk Maltester Tate Maier Welch Martin Alioto M. E. Landrieu Gibson Alexander McNichols Carver Hatcher Boosalis Young Fulton Padilla E. Morial Riley Berkley Holland Whitmire Isaac Flynn Althaus Abramson Ashe Rice R. M. Daley Helmke Corradini Webb Coles M. Morial Menino Garner Plusquellic O'Neill Guido Palmer Diaz Nickles Kautz Villaraigosa Nutter Smith Johnson Rawlings-Blake Cornett M. J. Landrieu

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 179742263

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