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George Michael MacIntyre (born March 14, 1965) is an American football coach who is currently head football coach at the University of Colorado Boulder. MacIntyre played college football at Vanderbilt and Georgia Tech and began his coaching career in 1990 as a graduate assistant at Georgia. From 1992 to 2002, MacIntyre held various assistant coaching positions at Davidson, UT Martin, Temple, and Ole Miss. From 2003 to 2007, MacIntyre was an assistant coach in the National Football League
National Football League
(NFL, first as defensive backs coach of the Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
from 2003 to 2006 and then in the same position with the New York Jets
New York Jets
in 2007. MacIntyre returned to college football as defensive coordinator for Duke from 2008 to 2009. Hired by San Jose State in 2010, MacIntyre became a head coach for the first time in his career. As San Jose State head coach from 2010 to 2012, MacIntyre coached a program that improved from a one-win season in 2010 to a 10–2 record in 2012. San Jose State also earned its first-ever BCS Top 25 ranking and first bowl invitation since 2006. After the 2012 regular season but before the 2012 Military Bowl, MacIntyre resigned from San Jose State to accept the head coach position at Colorado.

Contents

1 Early life and college 2 Coaching career

2.1 Assistant coach (1990–2009) 2.2 San Jose State head coach (2010–2012)

2.2.1 2010 2.2.2 2011 2.2.3 2012

2.3 Colorado (2013–present)

3 Coaching tree 4 Head coaching record 5 References 6 External links

Early life and college[edit] Born in 1965 in Miami, Florida, MacIntyre is one of two sons of former football coach George MacIntyre and Betty MacIntyre. The MacIntyre family lived in many places throughout the Southern United States, as George MacIntyre was a scout for the University of Miami
Miami
from 1964 to 1967, defensive coordinator of the University of Tampa
University of Tampa
(Tampa, Florida) in 1968, defensive back coach at Clemson University
Clemson University
(Clemson, South Carolina) from 1970 to 1972, and assistant coach for Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tennessee) from 1973 to 1974.[1][2][3] In 1975, George MacIntyre took his first head coaching position with UT Martin and became offensive coordinator for Ole Miss (the University of Mississippi) in 1978. From 1979 to 1985, George MacIntyre was head football coach of Vanderbilt University. Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
attended Brentwood Academy
Brentwood Academy
in Brentwood, Tennessee
Tennessee
near Nashville
Nashville
and played quarterback and defensive back on the football team.[4][5] After graduating from Brentwood in 1984,[6] Mike MacIntyre played college football at Vanderbilt, which was coached by his father, for two seasons as a free safety. After his father resigned, he transferred to Georgia Tech, where MacIntyre earned a bachelor's degree in business management in 1989.[7][8] Coaching career[edit] Assistant coach (1990–2009)[edit] MacIntyre enrolled in a University of Georgia
University of Georgia
graduate program and was a graduate assistant with the Georgia Bulldogs football
Georgia Bulldogs football
team. In 1991, MacIntyre earned his master's degree in sports management.[7] Georgia also won the 1991 Independence Bowl.[9] MacIntyre then became a defensive coordinator: at Davidson College
Davidson College
(then in Division III) in 1992, During the summers of 1992 and 1993, MacIntyre served as the assistant head coach and offensive coordinator for the Deggendorf Blackhawks in Germany. Then University of Tennessee
Tennessee
at Martin from 1993 to 1996, and Temple University from 1997 to 1998.[7] (George MacIntyre had been the head coach of UT Martin football from 1975 to 1977.) From 1999 to 2002, MacIntyre coached at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss), starting as the wide receiver coach then in 2001 the defensive secondary coach. MacIntyre actively helped recruit Patrick Willis to Ole Miss; Willis would become an All-Pro linebacker in the NFL. Ole Miss won the Independence Bowl
Independence Bowl
in 1999 and 2002 and was the runner-up of the 2000 Music City Bowl. In 2001, Ole Miss ranked fifth nationally in defensive for allowing 161.3 yards per game.[7] MacIntyre would then spend five seasons in the NFL starting in 2003: as the defensive backs coach of the Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
under Bill Parcells until 2006, then in 2007 in the same position with the New York Jets. In 2008, Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
returned to college football as the defensive coordinator for Duke, and in his first season with Duke, the Blue Devils allowed 67.4 fewer yards and 9.8 fewer points per game than in 2007.[10] His defenses produced two of the best seasons statistically the Blue Devils had achieved.[11] In 2009, the American Football Coaches Association recognized MacIntyre as FBS Assistant Coach of the Year.[12] San Jose State head coach (2010–2012)[edit] 2010[edit] On December 16, 2009, MacIntyre became the new head coach of the San Jose State Spartans football team, a member of the Western Athletic Conference (WAC), after Dick Tomey
Dick Tomey
retired.[13] The Spartans had just come off a 2–10 record in 2009 and had only three winning seasons since 1993, and athletic director Tom Bowen planned on making a full 85 scholarship athletes available to the football team, as Academic Progress Rate penalties limited yearly scholarships to between 67 and 72.[14][15] Local media considered MacIntyre to be a smart hire despite his inexperience as a head coach.[14] MacIntyre has stated that he chose to be the head coach to inspire success in the student-athletes and praised his father George MacIntyre for improving the struggling football programs UT Martin and Vanderbilt as coach.[16] He also planned on dropping the spread offense and expand recruiting rather than rely on junior college transfers.[15] San Jose State completed the 2010 season 1–12.[17] However, MacIntyre expressed optimism that the team would improve in 2011 given that the team would have 85 athletes on scholarship next season.[18] 2011[edit] In 2011, the Spartans finished 5–7.[19] Unlike the previous season in which MacIntyre had only six weeks of recruiting time, MacIntyre had a full term of recruiting.[20] The coach also commented shortly before the first game of 2011 that his players benefited by learning his playbook throughout 2010 despite the one-win season.[21] Then with the longest losing streak of Division I football, the Spartans lost 13 games in a row starting in 2010 until beating New Mexico State on September 24, 2011.[22] San Jose State averaged 190 rushing yards per game by then, a marked improvement from years past. San Jose Mercury News columnist Jon Wilner credited MacIntyre's experience coaching in the SEC, a conference Wilner wrote was "all about running between the tackles."[23] The next week, San Jose State won its second in a row and ended a 16-game road losing streak with a 38–31 victory over Colorado State; that win marked the first time since 2008 San Jose State won two consecutive games and first non-conference win since 2002.[24] San Jose State's homecoming game on October 14, 2011 was nationally televised as part of ESPN's College Football Friday Primetime, and San Jose State rallied to beat Hawaii 28–27, the team's third win in four games.[25] That win led to speculation that San Jose State would qualify for a bowl game.[26][27] 2012[edit]

MacIntyre and San Jose State players at Spartan Stadium in September 2012

In January 2012, MacIntyre accepted a contract extension through the 2017 season.[28] Scout.com ranked MacIntyre's 2012 recruiting class the best of the WAC.[29] In July, MacIntyre speculated that San Jose State could contend for a WAC championship this year.[30] San Jose State began the 2012 season 4–1, the best start since the 2006 New Mexico Bowl championship season.[31] The Spartans finished the regular season with a six-game winning streak and a 10–2 record—only two years removed from a 1-12 season—and for the first time in school history the Spartans earned a final end-of-season BCS ranking (#24).[32] The Spartans also finished the regular season with a #24 ranking in both the AP Poll and the USA Today Coaches Poll. MacIntyre made $450,000 per year as head coach of the Spartans.[11] Colorado (2013–present)[edit] On December 10, 2012, the University of Colorado
University of Colorado
announced that it was hiring MacIntyre to replace coach Jon Embree, who was fired after two seasons. Originally signed to a five-year contract, MacIntyre is the 25th full-time coach for the Colorado Buffaloes football
Colorado Buffaloes football
program. On September 2, 2013, MacIntyre won his opening game over Jim McElwain and rival Colorado State on a neutral field at Sports Authority Field at Mile High in Denver. His positivity and decision-making during the game were praised.[11] Coming off a 1–11 season in 2012, Colorado posted a 4–8 record in 2013. On February 20, 2014, the University of Colorado Board of Regents extended MacIntyre's contract through the 2018 season.[33] Colorado then went 2–10 in 2014 and 4–9 in 2015. Everything came together for Colorado in 2016. On October 22, Colorado became bowl eligible for the first time since 2007 after beating Stanford 10–5. Two weeks later, they clinched their first winning season since 2005 with a 20–10 victory over UCLA. On November 26, 2016, MacIntyre led the Buffaloes to a 27-22 victory over Utah, clinching the first Pac-12 South Division Championship in school history.[34] MacIntyre was named the Pac-12 Coach of the Year for 2016[35] after the Buffaloes were picked to finish last in the division prior to the season. He was also awarded the Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award becoming the second Colorado coach to earn the award,[36] on a team led by his first recruiting class, assembled just weeks after his hire.[37] On January 10, 2017, MacIntyre signed a 5-year, $16.25 million contract with Colorado that will see him under contract with the Buffaloes through the 2021 season.[38] Coaching tree[edit]

Kent Baer, previously defensive coordinator at San Jose State under MacIntyre, was interim head coach for San Jose State for the 2012 Military Bowl after MacIntyre resigned to take the head coaching position at Colorado. Tim Landis, MacIntyre's first offensive coordinator and tight ends coach at San Jose State, became head coach at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2011. Before joining MacIntyre's staff at San Jose State, Landis was a head coach at Davidson, Saint Mary's, and Bucknell.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°

San Jose State Spartans (Western Athletic Conference) (2010–2012)

2010 San Jose State 1–12 0–8 9th

2011 San Jose State 5–7 3–4 T–4th

2012 San Jose State 10–2 5–1 2nd Military* 21 21

San Jose State: 16–21 8–13 * Did not coach bowl game

Colorado Buffaloes (Pac-12 Conference) (2013–present)

2013 Colorado 4–8 1–8 6th (South)

2014 Colorado 2–10 0–9 6th (South)

2015 Colorado 4–9 1–8 6th (South)

2016 Colorado 10–4 8–1 1st (South) L Alamo 15 17

2017 Colorado 5–7 2–7 6th (South)

2018 Colorado 0–0 0–0 (South)

Colorado: 25–38 12–33

Total: 40–59

      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title or championship game berth

#Rankings from final Coaches Poll. °Rankings from final AP Poll.

References[edit]

^ "Sports in brief: Potluck". St. Petersburg Times. January 22, 1970. p. 2C.  ^ "George MacIntyre: Assistant Head Coach, Running Backs". Liberty Flames. Archived from the original on May 1, 1999.  ^ Fitzgerald, Tommy (February 2, 1964). "'Finger' returns to U-M as aide". The Miami
Miami
News. pp. 1C, 3C.  ^ Pogue, Greg (October 6, 2012). "Coach Stockstill, MacIntyre both have sons excelling at prep level". The Tennessean. Archived from the original on October 12, 2012.  ^ "1983 all-Nashville". HSFdatabase.com. Archived from the original on December 19, 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2012.  ^ "Alumni Honors". Alumni eNewsletter. Brentwood Academy. January 2010. Retrieved October 11, 2012.  ^ a b c d "Mike MacIntyre". San Jose State Spartans. December 17, 2009. Archived from the original on March 10, 2013.  ^ Wilner, John (August 31, 2010). "SJSU coach Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
follows father's lead into coaching ranks". San Jose Mercury News. Archived from the original on September 2, 2010.  Republished as "San Jose State football: The George and Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
story". ^ https://www.sports-reference.com/cfb/schools/georgia/1991.html ^ "Mike MacIntyre". Duke Blue Devils. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ a b c Kyle Ringo, CU Buffs hire San Jose State's Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
to lead football program, Daily Camera, December 10, 2012. ^ "2009 Assistant Coach of the Year Winners". AFCA. Archived from the original on August 18, 2012. Retrieved October 11, 2012.  ^ "MacIntyre formally introduced". Associated Press. December 17, 2009. Retrieved 2010-02-02.  ^ a b Purdy, Mark (December 17, 2009). "Time will tell if this is good hire for San Jose State". San Jose Mercury News. Archived from the original on December 18, 2009.  ^ a b FitzGerald, Tom (August 4, 2010). "MacIntyre faces program reversal with Spartans". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ Sabile, Melissa (September 2, 2010). "'Mac' inspires players, aspires for wins". The Spartan Daily. p. 5. Retrieved January 6, 2016.  ^ http://espn.go.com/college-football/team/schedule/_/id/23/year/2010/san-jose-state-spartans ^ FitzGerald, Tom (December 8, 2010). "San Jose State football 1–12 and full of optimism". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ http://espn.go.com/college-football/team/schedule/_/id/23/year/2011/san-jose-state-spartans ^ FitzGerald, Tom (February 2, 2011). "San Jose State Spartans' recruiting improving". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ Kroner, Steve (August 25, 2011). "San Jose State coach MacIntyre has big plans". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ "Spartans prevail, end nation's longest skid". San Francisco Chronicle. September 25, 2011.  ^ Wilner, Jon. "San Jose State football: Not good but at least functional". San Jose Mercury News. Archived from the original on October 1, 2011.  ^ "San Jose State Snaps Long Losing Streak With Win Over Colorado State". KPIX. October 2, 2011. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ Celario, Nick (October 17, 2011). "Sloppy game ends in victorious bliss for SJSU football team as it topples Hawaii 28–27". Spartan Daily. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ Wilner, John (October 16, 2011). "San Jose State football: Grading the Week". San Jose Mercury News. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ Faraudo, Jeff (October 28, 2011). "A road win over Louisiana Tech would aid San Jose State's bowl aspirations". San Jose Mercury News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2011. Retrieved June 25, 2015.  ^ " Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
Extended Through 2017 Season". San Jose State. January 25, 2012. Retrieved June 25, 2015.  ^ Kroner, Steve (February 1, 2012). "San Jose State pledges 19 football recruits". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved April 15, 2012.  ^ Durkin, Jimmy (July 31, 2012). "San Jose State considers itself a legitimate WAC contender in football". San Jose Mercury News. Archived from the original on August 9, 2012.  ^ Gleeson, Ron (October 4, 2012). "SJSU spending bye week preparing for Utah State". CSN Bay Area. Archived from the original on January 21, 2013. Retrieved October 11, 2012.  ^ "It's BCS-#24 San Jose State, #24 - Three Times". San Jose State Athletics. December 2, 2012. Archived from the original on December 5, 2012.  ^ Kuta, Sarah (February 20, 2014). "CU regents approve 1-year contract extension for Buffs coach Mike MacIntyre". Boulder Daily Camera. Retrieved November 1, 2016.  ^ "Colorado Captures First Pac-12 South Division Title". Pac-12. Pac-12. Retrieved 30 November 2016.  ^ Nick Kosmider (November 29, 2016). "Colorado Buffaloes' Mike MacIntyre named Pac-12 football coach of the year". Denver Post. Retrieved November 30, 2016.  ^ Bailey, Jeff. "Colorado coach Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
named Walter Camp Coach of the Year". Denver Post. Retrieved 1 December 2016.  ^ http://northdenvernews.com/cu-buffs-run-to-pac-12-championship-on-the-backs-of-macintyres-first-recruits-buffs/ ^ " Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
signs 3-year contract extension with Colorado Buffaloes – The Denver Post". Retrieved 2017-01-10. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Mike MacIntyre.

Colorado profile Duke profile

v t e

Colorado Buffaloes head football coaches

No coach (1890–1893) Harry Heller (1894) Fred Folsom (1895–1899) Theron W. Mortimer (1900) Fred Folsom (1901–1902) Dave Cropp (1903–1904) Willis Kienholz
Willis Kienholz
(1905) Frank Castleman
Frank Castleman
(1906–1907) Fred Folsom (1908–1915) Bob Evans (1916–1917) Enoch J. Mills
Enoch J. Mills
(1918–1919) Myron E. Witham
Myron E. Witham
(1920–1931) Bill Saunders (1932–1934) Bunny Oakes (1935–1939) Frank Potts (1940) James J. Yeager (1941–1943) Frank Potts (1944–1945) James J. Yeager (1946–1947) Dallas Ward
Dallas Ward
(1948–1958) Sonny Grandelius (1959–1961) William E. Davis (1962) Eddie Crowder
Eddie Crowder
(1963–1973) Bill Mallory (1974–1978) Chuck Fairbanks (1979–1981) Bill McCartney (1982–1994) Rick Neuheisel
Rick Neuheisel
(1995–1998) Gary Barnett
Gary Barnett
(1999–2005) Mike Hankwitz # (2005) Dan Hawkins
Dan Hawkins
(2006–2010) Brian Cabral # (2010) Jon Embree (2011–2012) Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
(2013– )

# denotes interim head coach.

v t e

Current head football coaches of the Pac-12 Conference

North Division

Justin Wilcox (California) Mario Cristobal (Oregon) Jonathan Smith (Oregon State) David Shaw (Stanford) Chris Petersen
Chris Petersen
(Washington) Mike Leach (Washington State)

South Division

Kevin Sumlin
Kevin Sumlin
(Arizona) Herm Edwards
Herm Edwards
(Arizona State) Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
(Colorado) Chip Kelly
Chip Kelly
(UCLA) Clay Helton
Clay Helton
(USC) Kyle Whittingham (Utah)

# denotes interim head coach

Links to related articles

v t e

San Jose State Spartans head football coaches

Unknown (1892) James E. Addicott (1893) No team (1894) James E. Addicott (1895) No team (1896–1897) Thad McKay (1898) Jess Woods (1899) James E. Addicott, Whitemeger & Fielding H. Yost
Fielding H. Yost
(1900) No team (1901–1920) David Wooster (1921–1922) Hovey C. McDonald (1923) Ernesto R. Knollin (1924–1928) Mush Crawford (1929–1931) Dudley DeGroot (1932–1939) Ben Winkelman (1940–1941) Glenn Hartranft
Glenn Hartranft
(1942) No team (1943–1945) Glenn Hartranft
Glenn Hartranft
(1946) Wilbur V. Hubbard (1947–1949) Bob Bronzan (1950–1956) Bob Titchenal (1957–1964) Harry Anderson (1965–1968) Joe McMullen (1969–1970) Dewey King (1970–1972) Darryl Rogers
Darryl Rogers
(1973–1975) Lynn Stiles (1976–1978) Jack Elway (1979–1983) Claude Gilbert (1984–1989) Terry Shea (1990–1991) Ron Turner (1992) John Ralston (1993–1996) Dave Baldwin (1997–2000) Fitz Hill (2001–2004) Dick Tomey
Dick Tomey
(2005–2009) Mike MacIntyre
Mike MacIntyre
(2010–2012) Kent Baer
Kent Baer
# (2012) Ron Caragher
Ron Caragher
(2013–2016) Brent Brennan
Brent Brennan
(2017– )

# denotes interim head coach

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AFCA Division I FBS Assistant Coach of the Year winners

1997: Gooch 1998: Bell 1999: Sandusky 2000: Gutekunst 2001: Jackson 2002: Aiken 2003: Petersen 2004: White 2005: Haywood 2006: Chavis 2007: Magee 2008: McWhorter 2009: MacIntyre 2010: Fickell 2011: Parker 2012: Smart 2013: Morris 2014: Campbell 2015: Brown 2016: Brooks 2017: Malone

v t e

AFCA Division I FBS Coach of the Year winners

1935: Waldorf 1936: Harlow 1937: Mylin 1938: Kern 1939: Anderson 1940: Shaughnessy 1941: Leahy 1942: Alexander 1943: Stagg 1944: Widdoes 1945: McMillin 1946: Blaik 1947: Crisler 1948: Oosterbaan 1949: Wilkinson 1950: Caldwell 1951: Taylor 1952: Munn 1953: Tatum 1954: Sanders 1955: Daugherty 1956: Wyatt 1957: Hayes 1958: Dietzel 1959: Schwartzwalder 1960: Warmath 1961: Bryant 1962: McKay 1963: Royal 1964: Broyles & Parseghian 1965: Prothro 1966: Cahill 1967: Pont 1968: Paterno 1969: Schembechler 1970: McClendon & Royal 1971: Bryant 1972: McKay 1973: Bryant 1974: Teaff 1975: Kush 1976: Majors 1977: James 1978: Paterno 1979: Bruce 1980: Dooley 1981: Ford 1982: Paterno 1983: Hatfield 1984: Edwards 1985: DeBerry 1986: Paterno 1987: MacPherson 1988: Nehlen 1989: McCartney 1990: Ross 1991: B. Lewis 1992: Stallings 1993: Alvarez 1994: Osborne 1995: Barnett 1996: Br. Snyder 1997: Carr 1998: Fulmer 1999: Beamer 2000: Stoops 2001: Coker & Friedgen 2002: Tressel 2003: Carroll 2004: Tuberville 2005: Paterno 2006: Grobe 2007: Mangino 2008: Whittingham 2009: Patterson 2010: C. Kelly 2011: Miles 2012: B. Kelly 2013: Cutcliffe 2014: Patterson 2015: Swinney 2016: MacIntyre 2017: Frost

v t e

Associated Press College Football Coach of the Year Award winners

1998: Snyder 1999: Beamer 2000: Stoops 2001: Friedgen 2002: Ferentz 2003: Saban 2004: Tuberville 2005: Paterno 2006: Grobe 2007: Mangino 2008: Saban 2009: Patterson 2010: C. Kelly 2011: Miles 2012: B. Kelly 2013: Malzahn 2014: Patterson 2015: Swinney 2016: MacIntyre 2017: Frost

v t e

Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award winners

1976: Dooley 1977: Schembechler 1978: Osborne 1979: Edwards 1980: Bowden 1981: Paterno 1982: G. MacIntyre 1983: Hatfield 1984: Wacker 1985: DeBerry 1986: Sheridan 1987: MacPherson 1988: Nehlen 1989: Curry 1990: Ross 1991: Welsh 1992: Robinson 1993: Alvarez 1994: Goldsmith 1995: Barnett 1996: Sutton 1997: Price 1998: Snyder 1999: Beamer 2000: O'Leary 2001: Friedgen 2002: Tressel 2003: Stoops 2004: Johnson 2005: Paterno 2006: Grobe 2007: Carr 2008: Brown 2009: Patterson 2010: Petersen 2011: Swinney 2012: Snyder 2013: Cutcliffe 2014: Saban 2015: Ferentz 2016: M. MacIntyre 2017: Shaw

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Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year Award winners

1957: Hayes 1958: Dietzel 1959: Schwartzwalder 1960: Warmath 1961: Royal 1962: McKay 1963: Royal 1964: Parseghian 1965: Daugherty 1966: Cahill 1967: Pont 1968: Hayes 1969: Schembechler 1970: Agase 1971: Devaney 1972: McKay 1973: Majors 1974: Teaff 1975: Hayes 1976: Majors 1977: Holtz 1978: Paterno 1979: Bruce 1980: Dooley 1981: Ford 1982: Paterno 1983: Schnellenberger 1984: Edwards 1985: DeBerry 1986: Paterno 1987: MacPherson 1988: Holtz 1989: McCartney 1990: Ross 1991: James 1992: Stallings 1993: Bowden 1994: Brooks 1995: Barnett 1996: Snyder 1997: Price 1998: Fulmer 1999: Beamer 2000: Stoops 2001: Friedgen 2002: Tressel 2003: Saban 2004: Meyer 2005: Weis 2006: Schiano 2007: Mangino 2008: Saban 2009: Patterson 2010: C. Kelly 2011: Gundy 2012: B. Kelly 2013: Malzahn 2014: Patterson 2015: Ferentz 2016: MacIntyre 2017: Frost

v t e

The Home Depot Coach of the Year Award winners

1994: Brooks 1995: Barnett 1996: Bowden 1997: Price 1998: Fulmer 1999: Solich 2000: Stoops 2001: Friedgen 2002: Willingham 2003: Carroll 2004: Meyer 2005: Paterno 2006: Schiano 2007: Mangino 2008: Saban 2009: Kelly 2010: Chizik 2011: Miles 2012: Kelly 2013: Malzahn 2014: Patterson 2015: Swinney 2016: MacIntyre 2017: Frost

v t e

Walter Camp Coach of the Year Award winners

1967: Pont 1968: Hayes 1969: Schembechler 1970: Blackman 1971: Devaney 1972: Paterno 1973: Majors 1974: Switzer 1975: Kush 1976: Burns 1977: Holtz 1978: Powers 1979: Mackovic 1980: Dooley 1981: Sherrill 1982: Stovall 1983: White 1984: Morrison 1985: DeBerry 1986: Johnson 1987: MacPherson 1988: Nehlen 1989: McCartney 1990: Ross 1991: B. Bowden 1992: Stallings 1993: T. Bowden 1994: Paterno 1995: Barnett 1996: Br. Snyder 1997: Carr 1998: Bi. Snyder 1999: Beamer 2000: Stoops 2001: Friedgen 2002: Ferentz 2003: Stoops 2004: Tuberville 2005: Paterno 2006: Schiano 2007: Mangino 2008: Saban 2009: Patterson 2010: C. Kelly 2011: Miles 2012: B. Kelly 2013: Cutcliffe 2014: Patterson 2015: Swinney 2016: MacIntyre 2017: Richt

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Pac-12 Coach of the Year Award winners

1975 Vermeil 1976 Robinson 1977 Walsh 1978 Robinson 1979 Brooks 1980 James 1981 Walden 1982 Kapp 1983 Walden 1984 Tollner 1985 Donahue 1986 Cooper 1987 Smith 1988 Erickson and Smith 1989 Kragthorpe 1990 James and Snyder 1991 James 1992 Tomey 1993 Donahue 1994 Brooks 1995 Willingham 1996 Snyder 1997 Price 1998 Toledo 1999 Willingham 2000 Erickson 2001 Price 2002 Tedford 2003 Carroll and Doba 2004 Tedford 2005 Carroll and Dorrell 2006 Carroll 2007 Erickson 2008 Riley 2009 Kelly 2010 Kelly 2011 Shaw 2012 Shaw 2013 Graham 2014 Rodriguez 2015 Shaw and Leach 2016 M

.