HOME
The Info List - Michelle O'Neill


--- Advertisement ---



Michelle Mary O'Neill (née Doris; born 10 January 1977) is an Irish Sinn Féin politician who has served as Vice President of Sinn Féin since February 2018 and Leader of Sinn Féin in the Northern Ireland Assembly since January 2017. She has been a Member of the Legislative Assembly (MLA) for Mid Ulster since 2007. She previously served as Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development from 2011 to 2016 and Minister of Health from 2016 to 2017, in the Northern Ireland Executive.[1][2][3][4][5]

Contents

1 Background 2 Political career

2.1 Early career 2.2 Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development 2.3 Minister of Health 2.4 Leader of Sinn Féin in the Northern Ireland Assembly

3 Personal life 4 Electoral history 5 References 6 External links

Background[edit] O'Neill comes from an Irish republican family in Clonoe, County Tyrone. She was born in Fermoy, County Cork. Her father, Brendan Doris, was a Provisional IRA prisoner and Sinn Féin councillor.[6] Her uncle, Paul Doris, is a former national president of the Irish Northern Aid Committee (NORAID).[7] A cousin, Tony Doris, was one of three IRA members shot dead by the SAS in 1991.[8] Another cousin, IRA volunteer Gareth Malachy Doris, was shot and wounded during the 1997 Coalisland attack.[9] After the death of Brendan Doris in 2006, Martin McGuinness paid tribute to the Doris family as "a well-known and respected republican family [who] have played a significant role in the republican struggle for many years".[10] O'Neill attended St. Patrick's Girls Academy, a Catholic grammar school in Dungannon, Tyrone.[11] She subsequently began to train as an accounting technician before pursuing a political career.[11] Unlike other senior members of Sinn Féin, she is not a Gaeilgeoir.[12] Political career[edit] Early career[edit] O'Neill became involved in republican politics in her teens,[6] assisting her father with constituency work in his role as a Dungannon councillor.[7] She joined Sinn Féin after the Good Friday Agreement in 1998, at the age of 21,[11][8] and started working as an advisor to Francie Molloy in the Northern Ireland Assembly. She kept this role until 2005,[10] when she was elected to represent the Torrent electoral area on Dungannon and South Tyrone Borough Council, taking the seat which had been vacated by her father.[13] O'Neill was elected as an MLA for Mid Ulster in the 2007 Assembly election, succeeding her Sinn Féin colleague Geraldine Dougan.[13] While a backbencher in the Assembly, she sat on Stormont's education and health committees.[14] In 2010, she became Mayor of Dungannon and South Tyrone.[15] O'Neill was the first woman to hold the position of Mayor, as well as one of the youngest people.[6] She held the council position until 2011.[13] Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development[edit] O'Neill succeeded Michelle Gildernew as Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development in the Northern Ireland Executive after the 2011 Assembly election.[16] One of her key decisions in the role was the relocation of the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development's headquarters from Belfast to a former British Army barracks in Ballykelly, County Londonderry in a bid to decentralise civil service jobs.[17] The decision overruled an internal report on the matter, which recommended Strabane as a more appropriate location.[11] In December 2013, the High Court quashed a decision by O'Neill to reallocate 7% of Common Agricultural Policy funds to rural development projects which had been favoured by environmentalists.[18] The court ruled that she was in breach of Ministerial Code having not sought the necessary permissions for the transfer from the Executive.[18] Minister of Health[edit] O'Neill replaced the Democratic Unionist Party's Simon Hamilton as Minister of Health following the 2016 election. After just eight days in office, she announced she would be scrapping the lifetime ban on gay and bisexual men donating blood in Northern Ireland.[19] On 25 October 2016, O'Neill unveiled a document titled Health and Wellbeing 2026: Delivering Together, a ten-year plan based on the findings of the Bengoa Report which aims to modernise the health and social care system.[20] Leader of Sinn Féin in the Northern Ireland Assembly[edit]

O'Neill replaced Martin McGuinness as Sinn Féin's leader in the Northern Ireland Assembly

On 23 January 2017, it was announced that O'Neill would replace Martin McGuinness as Sinn Féin's leader in the Northern Ireland Assembly.[2] McGuinness had resigned from the position and vacated the Executive Office in protest of Arlene Foster's handling of the Renewable Heating Incentive scandal. O'Neill was appointed in favour of former Provisional IRA member Conor Murphy, marking a notable break in the leadership's direct association with the organisation.[21][22][23] Sinn Féin delayed the nomination of O'Neill as McGuinness's replacement, triggering an snap election.[24][25] In the 2017 election, O'Neill topped the polls in Mid Ulster and was returned to the Assembly with a 20.6% share of the constituency's first-preference votes.[26][27] On 13 March 2017, she issued a statement calling for a referendum on Irish unity "as soon as possible" in response to the United Kingdom's decision to leave the European Union.[28] On 26 March, O'Neill stated that inter-party negotiations aiming to restore a power-sharing coalition in Northern Ireland had failed, and thus Sinn Féin would not nominate her for the position of deputy First Minister.[29][30] Personal life[edit] O'Neill and her husband, Paddy, have two adult children: daughter Saoirse and son Ryan.[11][10] Electoral history[edit] Northern Ireland Assembly elections

Year Constituency Party First-preference votes % Result

2007 Mid Ulster Sinn Féin 6,432 14.5 Elected

2011 Mid Ulster Sinn Féin 5,178 11.9 Elected

2016 Mid Ulster Sinn Féin 6,147 15.1 Elected

2017 Mid Ulster Sinn Féin 10,258 20.6 Elected[31]

References[edit]

^ "New northern Sinn Féin leader tells both governments to step up to the plate". 23 January 2017. Archived from the original on 26 January 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017.  ^ a b "We stand for equality, respect and integrity – O'Neill". www.sinnfein.ie. Archived from the original on 29 January 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2017.  ^ "Michelle O'Neill takes over as new Sinn Féin leader in North". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 22 February 2017. Retrieved 23 January 2017.  ^ Mid Ulster Archived 10 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine., ARK.ac.uk; accessed 3 March 2017. ^ "The Northern Ireland Assembly". Archived from the original on 2 May 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ a b c "5 things you should know about Michelle O'Neill, the new Sinn Fein leader at Stormont". The Irish News. 23 January 2017. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017.  ^ a b Breen, Suzanne (23 January 2017). "How does SF's Michelle O'Neill measure up to Arlene Foster?". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 24 January 2017.  ^ a b McDonald, Henry (23 January 2017). "Michelle O'Neill: new Sinn Féin leader marks republican sea change". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 24 January 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017.  ^ Barnes, Ciaran (20 February 2017). "Sinn Fein's Michelle O'Neill 'has no problem condemning criminality' after cousin convicted of fuel laundering". Belfast Telegraph. Retrieved 19 October 2017.  ^ a b c "Who is Michelle O'Neill? Meet the new leader of Sinn Féin in Northern Ireland". The Irish Post. 23 January 2017. Archived from the original on 27 February 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.  ^ a b c d e "Michelle O'Neill: Who is Sinn Féin's new Northern leader?". BBC News. 23 January 2017. Archived from the original on 25 January 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2017.  ^ Moriarty, Gerry (14 February 2018). "Why do some unionists fear the Irish language?". The Irish Times. Retrieved 15 February 2018.  ^ a b c "Mid Ulster – Michelle O'Neill profile". Sinn Féin. Archived from the original on 17 December 2017.  ^ Young, Connla. "Who is Michelle O'Neill?". The Irish News. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "Sinn Fein lady Mayor in Dungannon". Tyrone Times. Retrieved 2017-01-23.  ^ "Michelle new Agriculture Minister". Tyrone Times. 20 May 2011. Archived from the original on 2 February 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017.  ^ "Department of Agriculture's Ballykelly HQ plans unveiled". BBC News. 30 April 2015. Archived from the original on 28 May 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ a b Simpson, Mark (30 December 2013). "Michelle O'Neill will not challenge legal judgement". BBC News. Archived from the original on 28 May 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ correspondent, Henry McDonald Ireland (2 June 2016). "Northern Ireland to lift ban on gay men donating blood". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 20 December 2016. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "O'Neill launches 10 year vision for Health & Social Care". Health. 25 October 2016. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ correspondent, Henry McDonald Ireland (23 January 2017). "Michelle O'Neill: new Sinn Féin leader marks republican sea change". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 25 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "Subscribe to read". www.ft.com. Archived from the original on 29 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ McKeown, Gareth. "Michelle O'Neill set to be named new Sinn Féin leader at Stormont". The Irish News. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "Subscribe to read". www.ft.com. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ correspondent, Henry McDonald Ireland (23 January 2017). "Sinn Féin names Michelle O'Neill as new leader in Northern Ireland". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 25 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "Sinn Féin's Michelle O'Neill tops poll in Mid Ulster". ITV News. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "NI Assembly Election 2017 Result Sheet – Mid Ulster (XLS)". The Electoral Office of Northern Ireland – EONI. Archived from the original on 30 March 2017.  ^ "Michelle O'Neill calls for 'urgent' referendum on Irish unity". BBC News. 13 March 2017. Archived from the original on 29 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "NI political talks have run their course, says Sinn Fein". BBC News. 26 March 2017. Archived from the original on 28 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ correspondent, Henry McDonald Ireland (26 March 2017). "Northern Ireland power-sharing talks break down". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on 29 March 2017. Retrieved 29 March 2017.  ^ "Electoral Office for Northern Ireland". eoni.org.ouk. Archived from the original on 11 February 2017. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Michelle O'Neill at Wikimedia Commons

Northern Ireland Assembly

Preceded by Geraldine Dougan Member of the Legislative Assembly for Mid Ulster 2007–present Incumbent

Political offices

Preceded by Michelle Gildernew Minister for Agriculture and Rural Development 2011–2016 Succeeded by Michelle McIlveen as Minister of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs

Preceded by Simon Hamilton as Minister of Health, Social Services and Public Safety Minister of Health 2016–2017 Vacant Office suspended

Party political offices

Preceded by Martin McGuinness Leader of Sinn Féin in Northern Ireland 2017–present Incumbent

Preceded by Mary Lou McDonald Deputy Leader of Sinn Féin 2018–present

v t e

Sinn Féin

History

History of Sinn Féin

Abstentionism

Armalite and ballot box strategy Clann na hÉireann Cumann na nGaedheal (1900) Comhairle na dTeachtaí Éire Nua Election results Fianna Fáil Fine Gael Gaelic American German Plot Provisional IRA Sinn Féin Manifesto 1918 Sinn Féin MPs Sinn Féin (newspaper) Sinn Féin Printing & Publishing Company Republican News Republican Sinn Féin United Irishman Willie O'Dea affidavit incident Workers' Party of Ireland 32 County Sovereignty Movement

Leadership

Presidents

Edward Martyn (1905–08) John Sweetman (1908–11) Arthur Griffith (1911–17) Éamon de Valera (1917–26) John J. O'Kelly (Sceilg) (1926–31) Brian O'Higgins (1931–33) Michael O'Flanagan (1933–35) Cathal Ó Murchadha (1935–37) Margaret Buckley (1937–50) Paddy McLogan (1950–52) Tomás Ó Dubhghaill (1952–54) Paddy McLogan (1954–62) Tomás Mac Giolla (1962–70) Ruairí Ó Brádaigh (1970–83) Gerry Adams (1983–2018) Mary Lou McDonald (2018–present)

Vice presidents

John Sweetman (1905–07) Arthur Griffith (1905–08; 1917–22) Bulmer Hobson (1907–10) Jennie Wyse Power (1911–) Thomas Kelly (1911–) Fr. Michael O'Flanagan (1917–23) P. J. Ruttledge (1923–26) Mary MacSwiney John Madden John J. O'Kelly (1931-33) Margaret Buckley (1933–35; 1952–60) Liam Raul (1933-37) Tom Maguire (1935-37) Seamus Mitchell Padraig de Paor Criostóir O'Neill Michael Traynor (1950–54; 1962) Tomás Ó Dubhghaill (1950–52; 1954–62) Tony Magan (1960–62) Rory O'Driscoll (1962–63) Larry Grogan (1962–69; 1970–71) Seán Caughey (1963–65) Joe Clarke (1966–72) Cathal Goulding (1969–70) Dáithí Ó Conaill (1971–78; 1978–83) Máire Drumm (1972–76) Joe Cahill (1976–78) Gerry Adams (1978–83) Phil Flynn (1983–85) John Joe McGirl (1985–88) Pat Doherty (1988–2009) Mary Lou McDonald (2009–2018) Michelle O'Neill (2018–present)

Seanad leaders

Pearse Doherty (2007–10) David Cullinane (2011–16) Rose Conway-Walsh (2016–)

Northern Ireland leaders

Gerry Adams (1998–2007) Martin McGuinness (2007–17) Michelle O'Neill (2017–)

Chairpersons

Seán MacManus (1984–90) Tom Hartley (1990–96) Mitchel McLaughlin (1996–2005) Mary Lou McDonald (2005–09) Declan Kearney (2009–)

General secretaries

Joe Cahill Cathleen Knowles Tom Hartley (1984–86) Joe Reilly (1986–88) Lucilita Bhreatnach (1988–2003) Mitchel McLaughlin (2003–07) Rita O'Hare (2007–09) Dawn Doyle (2009–)

Directors of publicity

Seán Ó Brádaigh (1960–79) Danny Morrison (1979–90) Rita O'Hare (1990–98) Dawn Doyle (1998–2008) Rosaleen Doherty (2008–)

Party structures

Leader of Sinn Féin Ardfheis Sinn Féin Front Bench Sinn Féin Republican Youth An Phoblacht Friends of Sinn Féin

Presidential candidates

Martin McGuinness (2011)

Elected representatives

Dáil Éireann

Gerry Adams John Brady Pat Buckley Seán Crowe David Cullinane Pearse Doherty Dessie Ellis Martin Ferris Kathleen Funchion Martin Kenny Mary Lou McDonald Denise Mitchell Imelda Munster Carol Nolan Jonathan O'Brien Eoin Ó Broin Caoimhghín Ó Caoláin Donnchadh Ó Laoghaire Louise O'Reilly Aengus Ó Snodaigh Maurice Quinlivan Brian Stanley Peadar Tóibín

Seanad Éireann

Rose Conway-Walsh Máire Devine Paul Gavan Pádraig Mac Lochlainn Niall Ó Donnghaile Fintan Warfield

European Parliament

Martina Anderson Lynn Boylan Matt Carthy Liadh Ní Riada

Northern Ireland Assembly

Caoimhe Archibald Cathal Boylan Michaela Boyle Linda Dillon Jemma Dolan Sinéad Ennis Megan Fearon Órlaithí Flynn Colm Gildernew Declan Kearney Catherine Kelly Gerry Kelly Seán Lynch Alex Maskey Declan McAleer Raymond McCartney Fra McCann Philip McGuigan Ian Milne Karen Mullan Conor Murphy Carál Ní Chuilín John O'Dowd Máirtín Ó Muilleoir Michelle O'Neill Emma Rogan Pat Sheehan

House of Commons (Abstentionist)

Mickey Brady Michelle Gildernew Chris Hazzard Paul Maskey Elisha McCallion Barry McElduff Francie Molloy

Lists

List of current Sinn Féin elected representatives

Alliances

European United Left–Nordic Green Left

v t e

Leaders of political parties in the United Kingdom

House of Commons

Theresa May (Conservatives) Jeremy Corbyn (Labour) Ian Blackford (SNP) Sir Vince Cable (Liberal Democrats) Nigel Dodds (DUP) Liz Saville Roberts (Plaid Cymru) Caroline Lucas (Green)

Scottish Parliament

Nicola Sturgeon (SNP) Ruth Davidson (Scottish Conservatives) Richard Leonard (Scottish Labour) Willie Rennie (Scottish Liberal Democrats) Patrick Harvie and Maggie Chapman (Scottish Green)

National Assembly for Wales

Carwyn Jones (Welsh Labour) Andrew R. T. Davies (Welsh Conservatives) Leanne Wood (Plaid Cymru) Neil Hamilton (UK Independence Party) Kirsty Williams (Welsh Liberal Democrats)

Northern Ireland Assembly

Arlene Foster (DUP) Michelle O'Neill (Sinn Féin) Robin Swann (UUP) Colum Eastwood (SDLP) Naomi Long (Alliance) Steven Agnew (Green NI) Gerry Carroll (PBPA) Jim Allister (TUV)

Minor parties

Gerard Batten (UK Independence Party) Robin Tilbrook (English Democrats) Steve Radford (Liberal) Dick Cole (Mebyon Kernow) Alex Ashman (National Health Action) Howling Laud Hope (Official Monster Raving Loony Party) Billy Hutchinson (Progressive Unionist Party) Arthur Scargill (Socialist Labour) Dave Nellist (TUSC)

Portal:Politics List of political parties in the United Kingdom Politics of

.