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Dungannon And South Tyrone
Dungannon and South Tyrone Borough Council ( ga, Comhairle Buirge Dhún Geanainn agus Thír Eoghain Theas, Ulster Scots: ''Rathgannon an Sooth Owenslanngh Cooncil'') was a local council in Northern Ireland Northern Ireland ( ga, Tuaisceart Éireann ; sco, label=Ulster-ScotsUlster Scots, also known as Scotch-Irish, may refer to: * Ulster Scots people The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots The Ulster Scots (Ulster Scots dialects, Ulster- ... from 1973 until 2015. It was originally named Dungannon District Council, gaining borough status Borough status is granted by royal charter to local government districts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. The status is purely honorary, and does not give any additional powers to the Borough Council, council or inhabitants of the district. ... and adding "South Tyrone" to its name on 25 November 1999, after petitioning the Secretary of State for the Environment The Secretary of State for the Environment was a UK cabine ...
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List Of Districts In Northern Ireland By Area
Northern Ireland is divided into 11 districts for local government purposes. In Northern Ireland, local councils do not carry out the same range of functions as those in the rest of the United Kingdom; for example they have no responsibility for education, road-building or housing (although they do nominate members to the advisory Northern Ireland Housing Council). Their functions include urban planning, planning, Recycling in Northern Ireland, waste and recycling services, leisure and community services, building control and local economic and cultural development. The collection of rates (tax), rates is handled centrally by the Land and Property Services agency of the Northern Ireland Executive. Local Government Districts The 11 districts were established in 2015. Basic geographical statistics are shown below; data collected for List of districts in Northern Ireland by religion or religion brought up in, 'religion or religion brought up in' and List of districts in Northe ...
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Cookstown District Council
Cookstown District Council ( ga, Comhairle Cheantar na Coirre Críochaí; Ulster Scots: ''Districk Cooncil o Cookestoun'') was a district council covering an area largely in County Tyrone County Tyrone (; ) is one of the thirty-two traditional Counties of Ireland, counties of Ireland, one of the six Counties of Northern Ireland, counties of Northern Ireland and one of the nine counties of Ulster. It is no longer used as an admin ... and partly in County Londonderry County Londonderry (Ulster Scots dialects, Ulster-Scots: ''Coontie Lunnonderrie''), also known as County Derry ( ga, Contae Dhoire), is one of the six Counties of Northern Ireland, counties of Northern Ireland, one of the thirty two Counties .... It merged with Dungannon and South Tyrone Borough Council Dungannon and South Tyrone Borough Council ( ga, Comhairle Buirge Dhún Geanainn agus Thír Eoghain Theas, Ulster Scots dialects, Ulster Scots: ''Rathgannon an Sooth Owenslanngh Cooncil'') was a local co ...
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Coalisland
Coalisland is a small town in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland, with a population of 5,682 in the United Kingdom Census 2011, 2011 Census. Four miles from Lough Neagh, it was formerly a centre for coal mining. History Origins In the late 17th century coal deposits were discovered in East Tyrone. While it was possible to exploit these resources, the difficulty was getting the coal to market in Dublin. In 1744 work began on the Coalisland Canal linking the coalfields to Lough Neagh. The town grew up around the canal workings. Twentieth century On 24 August 1968, the Campaign for Social Justice (CSJ), the Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association (NICRA), among others, held the first civil rights march in Northern Ireland. The march went from Coalisland to Dungannon. The Troubles The town has traditionally been viewed as an IRA stronghold throughout the Twentieth Century, with deep and enduring links to republicanism in the vicinity. From 1969 in Northern Ireland, 1969 to 200 ...
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Moy, Northern Ireland
Moy () is a village and townland in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland about southeast of Dungannon and beside the smaller village of Charlemont, County Armagh, Charlemont. Charlemont is on the east bank of the River Blackwater, Northern Ireland, River Blackwater and Moy on the west; the two are joined by Charlemont Bridge. The river is also the boundary between County Tyrone and County Armagh. The 2011 United Kingdom census, 2011 Census recorded a population of 1,598. This article contains quotations from this source, which is available under th Open Government Licence v3.0 © Crown copyright. History The houses lining the village square are mostly mid-18th century, though all four churches (Roman Catholic Church, Roman Catholic, Church of Ireland, Presbyterianism, Presbyterian and Methodism, Methodist) are later. Moy had town commissioners under the Lighting of Towns (Ireland) Act, 1828 from 1844 until about 1865. The Troubles Incidents in Moy during the Troubles resulting in t ...
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Benburb
Benburb ()) is a village and townland in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It lies 7.5 miles from Armagh and 8 miles from Dungannon. The River Blackwater (Northern Ireland) runs alongside the village as does the Ulster Canal. History It is best known, in historical terms, for the Battle of Benburb that took place there in 1646. This was fought between the armies of Confederate Ireland led by Owen Roe O'Neill and the Scottish Covenanters led by Munro. The battle resulted in a crushing victory for O'Neill's men at the townland of Drumflugh around a mile outside the village. It was commemorated in the ballad "The Battle of Benburb". Since the Battle of Benburb was a rare 17th-century Irish military victory, in 1890 new Irish nationalist dominated Corporation in Dublin city renamed Barrack Street in Dublin's north inner city after the battle. Benburb Street runs between Queen Street and Blackhall Place. There is also a Benburb Street in south Belfast just off the Donegall Road. ...
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Aughnacloy, County Tyrone
Aughnacloy, sometimes spelt Auchnacloy (Irish: ''Achadh na Cloiche'' (field of the stone)) is a village in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. Close to the Irish border, border with County Monaghan in the Republic of Ireland, the village is about 20 km southwest of Dungannon, and 7 km southeast of Ballygawley, County Tyrone, Ballygawley. It is situated in the historic Barony (geographic), barony of Dungannon Lower and the Civil parishes in Ireland, civil parish of Carnteel. In the United Kingdom Census 2001, 2001 Census it had a population of 801. History Much of the town was built in the 18th Century by Acheson Moore, the local landlord. Because he backed the Jacobitism, Jacobite cause, he planted his estate in the shape of a thistle and planned out the town on the edge of it. Unable to rename it "Mooretown", he had to settle for naming the main street "Moore Street", and the side streets Sydney, Lettice, and Henrietta (now Ravella Road), after his three wives. Aughnac ...
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Caledon, County Tyrone
Caledon () is a small village and townland (of 232 acres) in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It is in the Clogher Valley on the banks of the River Blackwater, Northern Ireland, River Blackwater, 7 miles from Armagh. It lies in the southeast of Tyrone and near the borders of County Armagh and County Monaghan. It is situated in the historic Barony (geographic), barony of Dungannon Lower and the Civil parishes in Ireland, civil parish of Aghaloo. In the United Kingdom Census 2001, 2001 Census it had a population of 387 people. It is a designated conservation area. It was historically known as Kinnaird (Irish language, Irish: ''Cionn Aird'', meaning "head/top of the height or hill". History The old settlement of Kinard was burned in 1608 by the forces of Sir Cahir O'Doherty during O'Doherty's Rebellion. Sir Henry Óg O'Neill, the main local landowner, was killed by the rebels. Caledon House was built in 1779 by James Alexander, 1st Earl of Caledon, James Alexander, a member of the ...
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Ballygawley, County Tyrone
Ballygawley or Ballygawly () is a Village A village is a clustered human settlement In geography Geography (from Greek: , ''geographia'', literally "earth description") is a field of science devoted to the study of the lands, features, inhabitants, and phenomena ... in County Tyrone County Tyrone (; ) is one of the thirty-two traditional Counties of Ireland, counties of Ireland, one of the six Counties of Northern Ireland, counties of Northern Ireland and one of the nine counties of Ulster. It is no longer used as an admin ..., Northern Ireland Northern Ireland ( ga, Tuaisceart Éireann ; sco, label=Ulster-ScotsUlster Scots, also known as Scotch-Irish, may refer to: * Ulster Scots people The Ulster Scots (Ulster-Scots The Ulster Scots (Ulster Scots dialects, Ulster- .... It is about 20 kilometres southwest of Dungannon Dungannon () is a town in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It is the third-largest town in the county (a ...
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Fivemiletown
Fivemiletown is a village and townland in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It is 16 miles (26 km) east of Enniskillen and 26 miles (43 km) west-south-west of Dungannon, on the A4 road (Northern Ireland), A4 Enniskillen-to-Dungannon road. Fivemiletown's population was 1,243 at the 2011 United Kingdom census, 2011 Census. This article contains quotations from this source, which is available under th Open Government Licence v3.0 © Crown copyright. The village is most famous for its creamery, which was begun as a cooperative in 1898 by Hugh de Fellonburg Montgomery. Fivemiletown Creamery originally made butter and milk, but now makes cheeses for the British and Irish market, and for export across Europe and North America. Name Fivemiletown's name comes from its location five Irish miles (1 Irish mile = 1.27 statute miles = 2044 m) from its nearest neighbours: Clogher, Brookeborough and Tempo, County Fermanagh, Tempo. The original Irish name of the townland of Fivemiletow ...
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Clogher
Clogher (,) is a village and Civil parishes in Ireland, civil parish in the border area of south County Tyrone, Northern Ireland. It lies on the River Blackwater, Northern Ireland, River Blackwater, 5.8 miles from the border crossing to County Monaghan.It stands on the townlands of Clogher Demesne and Clogher Tenements. The 2011 United Kingdom census, 2011 Census recorded a population of 717. This article contains quotations from this source, which is available under th Open Government Licence v3.0 © Crown copyright. The civil parish of Clogher covers areas of County Fermanagh as well as County Tyrone. History Clogher is home to the provincial office in Northern Ireland for the congregation of the Sisters of Mercy (Roman Catholic order of nuns). From 1971-1991 The Mercy Order employed some of their nuns at St Macartan's Primary School following the leave of the order of saint louis as the school was actually founded by the Sisters of St Louis in the 1930s due to the high dem ...
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Augher
Augher (from ga, Eochair meaning "edge/border") is a small village in County Tyrone, Ireland. It is southwest of Dungannon, on the A4 road (Northern Ireland), A4 Dungannon to Enniskillen road, halfway between Ballygawley, County Tyrone, Ballygawley and Clogher. It is situated in the historic Barony (geographic), barony of Clogher (barony), Clogher and the Civil parishes in Ireland, civil parish of Clogher. The United Kingdom Census 2001, 2001 Census recorded a population of 399. The town gives its name to the local Gaelic Football Club. Augher was also a victim to several bombings throughout the 1980s and 1990s with 7 bombings in the town , from both the IRA and the UVF. The most recent of these bombings was by the IRA in 1992 against Clogher vallley creamery, a domintaly protestant creamery however it is noted Augher village has been both majority Irish and Catholic since 2001. Saint Brigid's Primary School In 1966, It was recognised that Augher had no proper schooling for Ro ...
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County Armagh
County Armagh (named after its county town In the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Telegraph' use Britain as a synonym for the United Kingdom. Some pref ..., Armagh Armagh ( ; ga, Ard Mhacha, , "Macha Macha () was a sovereignty goddess Sovereignty goddess is a scholarly term, almost exclusively used in Celtic studies (although parallels for the idea have been claimed in other traditions, usually unde ...) is one of the thirty-two counties of Ireland The counties of Ireland (Irish Irish most commonly refers to: * Someone or something of, from, or related to: ** Ireland, an island situated off the north-western coast of continental Europe ** Northern Ireland, a constituent unit of the Unit ... and one of six counties of Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Northern Ireland ( ga, Tuaisceart Éireann ; Ulster Scots dial ...
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