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Metacritic
Metacritic
is a website that aggregates reviews of media products: films, TV shows, music albums, video games, and formerly, books. For each product, the scores from each review are averaged (a weighted average).[2] Metacritic
Metacritic
was created by Jason Dietz, Marc Doyle, and Julie Doyle Roberts in 1999. The site provides an excerpt from each review and hyperlinks to its source. A color of green, yellow or red summarizes the critics' recommendations. It has been described as the video game industry's "premier" review aggregator.[3][4] Metacritic's scoring converts each review into a percentage, either mathematically from the mark given, or which the site decides subjectively from a qualitative review. Before being averaged, the scores are weighted according to the critic's fame, stature, and volume of reviews.

Contents

1 History 2 Metascores 3 Video games

3.1 Criticism

4 Films 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit] Metacritic
Metacritic
was launched in January 2001[5] by Marc Doyle, his sister Julie Doyle Roberts, and a classmate from the University of Southern California law school, Jason Dietz, after two years of developing the site. Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
was already compiling movie reviews, but Doyle, Roberts and Dietz saw an opportunity to cover a broader range of media. They sold Metacritic
Metacritic
to CNET
CNET
in 2005.[6] CNET
CNET
and Metacritic
Metacritic
were later acquired by the CBS Corporation.[7] In August 2010, the website's appearance was revamped.[8] In June 2018, the website introduced the 'Metacritic: Must-See' label for films that attain scores of 81% or more, with at least 15 professional reviews for the given film.[9] In September 2018, it added the 'Metacritic: Must-Play' certification for video games attaining a score of 90% or more, and a minimum number of 15 reviews from industry professionals.[10]

Metascores[edit] Scores are weighted averages. Certain publications are given more significance "because of their stature".[6] Metacritic
Metacritic
has said that it will not reveal the relative weight assigned to each reviewer.[11] Games Editor Marc Doyle was interviewed by Keith Stuart of The Guardian to "get a look behind the metascoring process". Stuart wrote: "The metascore phenomenon, namely Metacritic
Metacritic
and GameRankings, have become an enormously important element of online games journalism over the past few years".[12] Doyle said that because video games lead to a greater investment of time and money, gamers are more informed about reviews than are fans of film or music; they want to know "whether that hotly anticipated title is going to deliver".[12] The rating indication of metascores is:[13]

Indication

Video games

Films/television/music

Universal acclaim

90–100

81–100

Generally favorable reviews

75–89

61–80

Mixed or average reviews

50–74

40–60

Generally unfavorable reviews

20–49

20–39

Overwhelming dislike

0–19

0–19

Video games[edit] Metacritic
Metacritic
is regarded as the foremost online review aggregation site for the video game industry.[3][4] Nick Wingfield of The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal
has written that Metacritic "influence[s] the sales of games and the stocks of video game publishers". He explains its influence as coming from the higher cost of buying video games than music or movie tickets.[6] Many executives say that low scores "can hurt the long-term sales potential".[6] Wingfield wrote that Wall Street
Wall Street
pays attention to Metacritic
Metacritic
and GameRankings
GameRankings
because the sites typically post scores before sales data are publicly available, citing the respective rapid rise and fall in company values after BioShock
BioShock
and Spider-Man 3 were released.[6] In an interview with The Guardian, Marc Doyle cited "two major publishers" that "conducted comprehensive statistical surveys through which they've been able to draw a correlation between high metascores and stronger sales" in certain genres.[12] He claimed that an increasing number of businesses and financial analysts use Metacritic as "an early indicator of a game's potential sales and, by extension, the publisher's stock price".[12] In 2004, Jason Hall and Marcus Johnson of Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
began "including 'quality metrics' in contracts with partners licensing its movies for games": if a product does not at least achieve a specific score, some deals require the publisher to pay higher royalties.[6] In 2008, Microsoft
Microsoft
began using Metacritic
Metacritic
averages to de-list underperforming Xbox Live Arcade
Xbox Live Arcade
games.[14][15] A study done in 2015 over 88 Xbox 360
Xbox 360
and 80 PS3
PS3
games from 2012 found that "metacritic scores have no impact in determining actual sales"[16]

Criticism[edit] Some game reviewers take issue with the way Metacritic
Metacritic
assigns scores. When a reviewer gives a rating of "A", Metacritic
Metacritic
assigns it a value of 100, and for "F" a value of zero; some[who?] think a score of 50 would be more appropriate.[6] For a "B–", Metacritic assigns a value of 67, yet some publishers, developers, and websurfers[who?] believe it should be closer to 80, in line with the conversion often used in the US education system.[12] Joe Dodson, former editor at Game Revolution, criticized Metacritic and similar sites for turning reviews into scores that are too low.[6] However, Doyle responded: "I feel that ANY scale simply needs to be converted directly with its lowest possible grade equating to 0, and the highest to 100".[12] Doyle said that some publishers want him to include extra critics, and exclude others, usually because they have given a poor review. Another common complaint from US publishers is that British critics should not be reviewing games that are based on American sports like the NFL, NASCAR, or the NBA. Doyle said: "Conversely, many European publishers feel that American critics are not qualified or properly situated to review football, rally, F1, cricket, and rugby games...once I've decided to track a publication, I cannot pick and choose which reviews I list on Metacritic
Metacritic
based on such individual judgments".[12] Publishers often try to persuade Doyle to exclude reviews they feel are unfair, but he said that once a publication is included, he refuses to omit any of its reviews.[6] A Washington Post review of Uncharted 4
Uncharted 4
was assigned with a rating of 40/100 by Metacritic; this was the only "negative" review of the game.[17] Gamers who did not like the review petitioned Metacritic
Metacritic
to remove the Post as a trusted source.[18] As a result of its perceived negative influence on the industry, several reviewing sites, including Kotaku
Kotaku
and Eurogamer, have dropped numerical reviews that would appear in Metacritic, instead favoring a qualitative assessment of a game.[19][20] Metacritic
Metacritic
has been criticized for how it handles banning users and their reviews, with no notice or formal process for appeal.[21] Critics and developers have pointed out the website's lack of personal management along with its automatic systems, since a video game can be review bombed with low ratings to damage its reputation. In the same respect, a game can be given multiple 10 ratings by throwaway accounts to make it appear more popular than it actually is. Signal Studios president and creative director Douglas Albright described the website as having "no standards".[22]

Films[edit] This section needs expansion with: more details. You can help by adding to it. (March 2019) Metacritic
Metacritic
lists over 9,000 films ranked by aggregate score on a Marcus rating scale.[23]

See also[edit] Rating site Internet Movie Database (IMDb) References[edit]

^ "metacritic.com Traffic Statistics". Alexa Internet. Retrieved June 13, 2018..mw-parser-output cite.citation font-style:inherit .mw-parser-output .citation q quotes:"""""""'""'" .mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-free a background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/65/Lock-green.svg/9px-Lock-green.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center .mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-limited a,.mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-registration a background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/Lock-gray-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-gray-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center .mw-parser-output .citation .cs1-lock-subscription a background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Lock-red-alt-2.svg/9px-Lock-red-alt-2.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center .mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration color:#555 .mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription span,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration span border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help .mw-parser-output .cs1-ws-icon a background:url("//upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/4c/Wikisource-logo.svg/12px-Wikisource-logo.svg.png")no-repeat;background-position:right .1em center .mw-parser-output code.cs1-code color:inherit;background:inherit;border:inherit;padding:inherit .mw-parser-output .cs1-hidden-error display:none;font-size:100% .mw-parser-output .cs1-visible-error font-size:100% .mw-parser-output .cs1-maint display:none;color:#33aa33;margin-left:0.3em .mw-parser-output .cs1-subscription,.mw-parser-output .cs1-registration,.mw-parser-output .cs1-format font-size:95% .mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-left,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-left padding-left:0.2em .mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-right,.mw-parser-output .cs1-kern-wl-right padding-right:0.2em

^ "How We Create the Metascore Magic". Archived from the original on 2015-09-28. Retrieved 2013-10-28.

^ a b "OpenCritic's Gamer-Centric Style Is Everything Metacritic Should Have Been".

^ a b Mike Rose. "Gamasutra - Metacritic
Metacritic
is here to stay, but can we fix it?".

^ "Metacritic: The History", Metacritic.com

^ a b c d e f g h i Nick Wingfield (2007-09-20). "High Scores Matter To Game Makers, Too". The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal. Retrieved 2008-02-15.

^ "Columbia Journalism Review - CJR's guide to what the major media companies own". Retrieved 2011-11-28.

^ "Welcome to the New Metacritic". Metacritic. CBS
CBS
Corporation. 2010. Retrieved 2011-10-04.

^ "New on Metacritic: Must-See Movies". CBS
CBS
Corporation. Retrieved 2018-10-16.

^ "New on Metacritic: Must-Play Games". CBS
CBS
Corporation. Retrieved 2018-10-16.

^ "Frequently Asked Questions". Metacritic. Retrieved 2015-07-29.

^ a b c d e f g Keith Stuart (2008-01-17). "Interview: the science and art of Metacritic". The Guardian. Retrieved 2008-02-15.

^ "How We Create the Metascore Magic". Metacritic. CBS
CBS
Interactive Inc. Archived from the original on 2015-09-28. Retrieved 2012-05-13.

^ Chris Remo (2008-05-22). " Microsoft
Microsoft
To Delist Low-Ranking XBLA Titles, Raise Size Limit". GamaSutra. Retrieved 2008-05-22.

^ Joe Keiser (2008-05-22). "EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: MS to Delist XBLA Titles". Next Generation. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved 2008-05-29.

^ Khan, Imad (2015-12-11). "Do Metacritic
Metacritic
scores affect game sales?". The Daily Dot.

^ "Uncharted 4: A Thief's End for Playstation 4 Reviews". Metacritic. Retrieved August 6, 2018.

^ Schreier, Jason (May 16, 2016). "Reviewer Targeted For Giving Uncharted 4
Uncharted 4
Negative Review". Kotaku. Retrieved May 16, 2016.

^ Tolito, Stephan (2012-01-30). "How We Will Review Games". Kotaku. Retrieved 2015-02-10.

^ Welsh, Oli (2015-02-10). " Eurogamer
Eurogamer
has dropped review scores". Eurogamer. Retrieved 2015-02-10.

^ " Metacritic
Metacritic
Bans "Bombing" Users – Bans several users only after a request by developers". Retrieved 2011-09-23.

^ " Metacritic
Metacritic
criticized by company president – Exclaims site without standards". Retrieved 2011-09-22.

^ "Best Movies of All Time". Metacritic.

External links[edit]

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