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Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(born Julie Anne Smith; December 3, 1960) is an American actress, prolific in films since the early 1990s. She is particularly known for her portrayals of emotionally troubled women in both independent and Hollywood
Hollywood
films, and has received many accolades, including the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Actress. After studying theatre at Boston University, Moore began her career with a series of television roles. From 1985 to 1988, she was a regular in the soap opera As the World Turns, earning a Daytime Emmy for her performance. Her film debut was in Tales from the Darkside: The Movie (1990), and she continued to play small roles for the next four years – including in the thriller The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992). Moore first received critical attention with Robert Altman's Short Cuts
Short Cuts
(1993), and successive performances in Vanya on 42nd Street (1994) and Safe (1995) continued this acclaim. Starring roles in the blockbusters Nine Months
Nine Months
(1995) and The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) established her as a leading actress in Hollywood. Moore received considerable recognition in the late 1990s and early 2000s, earning Oscar nominations for Boogie Nights
Boogie Nights
(1997), The End of the Affair (1999), Far from Heaven
Far from Heaven
(2002) and The Hours (2002). In the first of these, she played a 1970s pornographic actress, while the other three featured her as an unhappy, mid-20th century housewife. She also had success with the films The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski
(1998), Magnolia (1999), Hannibal (2001), Children of Men
Children of Men
(2006), A Single Man
A Single Man
(2009), The Kids Are All Right (2010), and Crazy, Stupid, Love
Crazy, Stupid, Love
(2011), and won several awards for her portrayal of Sarah Palin
Sarah Palin
in the television film Game Change (2012). The year 2014 was key for Moore, as she gave an Oscar-winning performance as an Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's
patient in Still Alice, was named Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
for Maps to the Stars, and joined the lucrative Hunger Games series. In addition to acting, Moore has written a series of children's books about a character named "Freckleface Strawberry". She is married to director Bart Freundlich, with whom she has two children.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Acting career

2.1 Early roles (1985–93) 2.2 Rise to prominence (1993–97) 2.3 Widespread recognition (1997–2002) 2.4 Established actress (2003–09) 2.5 Television and comedy (2010–13) 2.6 Awards success and film series (2014–present)

3 Reception and acting style 4 Writing 5 Personal life 6 Filmography 7 Awards and nominations 8 Published works 9 References 10 External links

Early life[edit] Moore was born Julie Anne Smith on December 3, 1960,[1] at the Fort Bragg army installation in North Carolina, the oldest of 3 siblings.[2] Her father, Peter Moore Smith,[3] was a paratrooper in the United States Army during the Vietnam War, who later attained the rank of colonel and became a military judge.[4][5] Her Scottish mother, Anne (née Love; 1940–2009),[6] was a psychologist and social worker from Greenock, Scotland, who immigrated to the United States in 1951 with her family.[3][7] Moore has a younger sister, Valerie, and a younger brother, the novelist Peter Moore Smith.[3][8][9] As Moore is half-Scottish, she claimed British citizenship in 2011 to honor her deceased mother.[2][10]

The theater of Boston University, where Moore trained to be an actress

Moore frequently moved around the United States as a child, due to her father's occupation. She was close to her family as a result, but has said she never had the feeling of coming from one particular place.[1][5] The family lived in multiple locations, including Alabama, Georgia, Texas, Panama, Nebraska, Alaska, New York, and Virginia, and Moore attended nine different schools.[11] The constant relocating made her an insecure child, and she struggled to establish friendships.[2][5] Despite these difficulties, Moore later remarked that an itinerant lifestyle was beneficial to her future career: "When you move around a lot, you learn that behavior is mutable. I would change, depending on where I was ... It teaches you to watch, to reinvent, that character can change."[12] When Moore was 16, the family moved from Falls Church, Virginia, where Moore had been attending J.E.B. Stuart High School, to Frankfurt, Germany, where she attended Frankfurt
Frankfurt
American High School.[5][11] She was clever and studious, a self-proclaimed "good girl", and she planned to become a doctor.[4] She had never considered performing, or even attended the theatre,[11] but she was an avid reader and it was this hobby that led her to begin acting at the school.[1][13] She appeared in several plays, including Tartuffe
Tartuffe
and Medea, and with the encouragement of her English teacher she chose to pursue a theatrical career.[14] Moore's parents supported her decision, but asked that she train at university to provide the added security of a college degree.[4] She was accepted to Boston University
Boston University
and graduated with a BFA in Theatre in 1983.[14] Acting career[edit] Early roles (1985–93)[edit]

"There was already a Julie Smith, a Julie Anne Smith, there was everything. My father's middle name is Moore; my mother's name is Anne. So I just slammed the Anne onto the Julie. That way, I could use both of their names and not hurt anyone's feelings. But it's horrible to change your name. I'd been Julie Smith my whole life, and I didn't want to change it."

—Moore explaining why and how she adopted her stage name[15]

Moore moved to New York City
New York City
after graduating, and worked as a waitress.[16] After registering her stage name with Actors' Equity,[15] she began her career in 1985 with off-Broadway theatre.[17] Her first screen role came in 1985, in an episode of the soap opera The Edge of Night.[18] Her break came the following year, when she joined the cast of As the World Turns. Playing the dual roles of half-sisters Frannie and Sabrina Hughes, she found this intensive work to be an important learning experience, and she said of it fondly: "I gained confidence and learned to take responsibility."[14] Moore performed on the show until 1988, when she won a Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Ingenue in a Drama Series.[19][20] Before leaving As the World Turns, she had a role in the 1987 CBS
CBS
miniseries I'll Take Manhattan.[11] Once she had finished the soap opera, she turned to the stage to play Ophelia
Ophelia
in a Guthrie Theater
Guthrie Theater
production of Hamlet
Hamlet
opposite Željko Ivanek.[15][21][22] The actress returned intermittently to television over the next three years, appearing in the TV movies Money, Power, Murder (1989), The Last to Go (1991), and Cast a Deadly Spell (1991).[23] In 1990, Moore began working with stage director Andre Gregory on a workshop theatre production of Chekhov's Uncle Vanya. Described by Moore as "one of the most fundamentally important acting experiences I ever had",[11] the group spent four years exploring the text and giving intimate performances to friends.[24] Also in 1990, Moore made her cinematic debut as a mummy's victim in Tales from the Darkside: The Movie, a low-budget horror that she later described as "terrible".[25][26] Her next film role, in 1992, introduced her to a wide audience. The thriller The Hand That Rocks the Cradle—in which she played the main character's ill-fated friend—was number one at the US box office, and Moore caught the attention of several critics with her performance.[15][27] She followed it the same year with the crime comedy The Gun in Betty Lou's Handbag, appearing as the protagonist's kooky sister. Moore continued to play supporting roles throughout 1993, first featuring in the erotic thriller Body of Evidence as Madonna's love rival. The film was a failure and widely mocked, and she later regretted her involvement.[15][28] She had greater success in a 1993 romantic comedy with Johnny Depp. In Benny & Joon, she played a gentle waitress who falls for Aidan Quinn's character, Benny. Moore also appeared briefly as a doctor in one of the year's biggest hits, the Harrison Ford
Harrison Ford
thriller The Fugitive.[15][29] Rise to prominence (1993–97)[edit]

Robert Altman, who gave Moore her breakthrough in Short Cuts
Short Cuts
(1993)

The filmmaker Robert Altman
Robert Altman
saw Moore in the Uncle Vanya
Uncle Vanya
production, and was sufficiently impressed to cast her in his next project: the ensemble drama Short Cuts
Short Cuts
(1993), based on short stories by Raymond Carver. Moore was pleased to work with him, as his film 3 Women
3 Women
(1977) gave her a strong appreciation for cinema when she saw it in college.[30] Playing artist Marian Wyman was an experience she found difficult, as she was a "total unknown" surrounded by established actors, but this proved to be Moore's breakout role.[25][31] Variety magazine described her as "arresting" and noted that her monologue, delivered naked from the waist down, would "no doubt be the most discussed scene" of the film.[32] Short Cuts
Short Cuts
was critically acclaimed, and received awards for Best Ensemble Cast at the Venice Film Festival and the Golden Globe Awards. Moore received an individual nomination for Best Supporting Female at the Independent Spirit Awards, and the monologue scene earned her a degree of notoriety.[33][34] Short Cuts
Short Cuts
was one of a trio of successive film appearances that boosted Moore's reputation.[14] It was followed in 1994 with Vanya on 42nd Street, a filmed version of her ongoing Uncle Vanya
Uncle Vanya
workshop production, directed by Louis Malle.[24] Moore's performance of Yelena was described as "simply outstanding" by Time Out,[35] and she won the Boston Society of Film Critics award for Best Actress.[36] Following this, Moore was given her first leading role, playing an unhappy suburban housewife who develops multiple chemical sensitivity in Todd Haynes' low-budget film Safe (1995). She had to lose a substantial amount of weight for the role, which made her ill, and she vowed never to change her body for a film again.[37] In their review, Empire magazine writes that Safe "first established [Moore's] credentials as perhaps the finest actress of her generation."[38] The film historian David Thomson later described it as "one of the most arresting, original and accomplished films of the 1990s,"[4] and the performance earned Moore an Independent Spirit Award nomination for Best Actress.[39] Reflecting on these three roles, Moore has said, "They all came out at once, and I suddenly had this profile. It was amazing."[14] Moore's next appearance was a supporting role in the comedy–drama Roommates (1995), playing the wife of Peter Falk. Her following film, Nine Months
Nine Months
(1995), was crucial in establishing her as a leading lady in Hollywood.[2] The romantic comedy, directed by Chris Columbus and co-starring Hugh Grant, was poorly reviewed but a box office success; it remains one of her highest-grossing films.[40][41][42] Her next release was also a Hollywood
Hollywood
production, as Moore appeared alongside Sylvester Stallone
Sylvester Stallone
and Antonio Banderas
Antonio Banderas
in the thriller Assassins (1995). Despite negativity from critics, the film earned $83.5 million worldwide.[43][44] Moore's only appearance of 1996 came in the Merchant Ivory film Surviving Picasso, where she played the artist Dora Maar opposite Anthony Hopkins. The period drama met with poor reviews.[45] A key point in Moore's career came when she was cast by Steven Spielberg to star as paleontologist Dr. Sarah Harding in The Lost World: Jurassic Park—the sequel to his 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park.[2] Filming the big-budget production was a new experience for Moore, and she has said she enjoyed herself "tremendously".[10] It was a physically demanding role, with the actress commenting, "There was so much hanging everywhere. We hung off everything available, plus we climbed, ran, jumped off things ... it was just non-stop."[46] The Lost World (1997) finished as one of the ten highest-grossing films in history to that point,[37] and was pivotal in making Moore a sought-after actress: "Suddenly I had a commercial film career," she said.[2] The Myth of Fingerprints
The Myth of Fingerprints
was her second film released in 1997. During its production she met her future husband in director Bart Freundlich.[1] Later that year, Moore made a cameo appearance in the dark comedy Chicago Cab.[47] Widespread recognition (1997–2002)[edit] The late 1990s and early 2000s saw Moore achieve significant industry recognition. Her first Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination came for the critically acclaimed[48] Boogie Nights
Boogie Nights
(1997), which centers on a group of individuals working in the 1970s pornography industry. Director Paul Thomas Anderson
Paul Thomas Anderson
was not a well-known figure before its production, with only one feature credit to his name, but Moore agreed to the film after being impressed with his "exhilarating" script.[1][11] The ensemble piece featured Moore as Amber Waves, a leading porn actress and mother-figure who longs to be reunited with her real son. Martyn Glanville of the BBC
BBC
commented that the role required a mixture of confidence and vulnerability, and was impressed with Moore's effort.[49] Time Out called the performance "superb",[50] while Janet Maslin of The New York Times
The New York Times
found it "wonderful".[51] Alongside her Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actress, Moore was nominated at the Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild awards, and several critics groups named her a winner.

Moore played Maude Lebowski in the cult Coen brothers
Coen brothers
film The Big Lebowski (1998). She is seen here with co-star Jeff Bridges
Jeff Bridges
at the 2011 Lebowski Fest.

Moore followed her success in Boogie Nights
Boogie Nights
with a role in the Coen brothers' dark comedy The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski
(1998). The film was not a hit at the time of release but subsequently became a cult classic.[52] Her role was Maude Lebowski, a feminist artist and daughter of the eponymous character who becomes involved with "The Dude" (Jeff Bridges, the film's star). At the end of 1998, Moore had a flop with Gus Van Sant's Psycho, a remake of the classic Alfred Hitchcock
Alfred Hitchcock
film of the same name.[26] She played Lila Crane
Lila Crane
in the film, which received poor reviews[53] and is described by The Guardian
The Guardian
as one of her "pointless" outings.[37] The review in Boxoffice magazine regretted that "a group of enormously talented people wasted several months of their lives" on the film.[54] After reuniting with Robert Altman
Robert Altman
for the dark comedy Cookie's Fortune (1999), Moore starred in An Ideal Husband—Oliver Parker's adaptation of the Oscar Wilde
Oscar Wilde
play. Set in London at the end of the 19th century, her performance of Mrs. Laura Cheverly earned a Golden Globe nomination for Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy. She was also nominated in the Drama category that year for her work in The End of the Affair (1999). Based on the novel by Graham Greene, Moore played opposite Ralph Fiennes
Ralph Fiennes
as an adulterous wife in 1940s Britain. The critic Michael Sragow was full of praise for her work, writing that her performance was "the critical element that makes [the film] necessary viewing."[55] Moore received her second Academy Award nomination for the role—her first for Best Actress—as well as nominations at the British Academy (BAFTA) and Screen Actors Guild (SAG) awards. In between her two Golden Globe-nominated performances, Moore was seen in A Map of the World, supporting Sigourney Weaver, as a bereaved mother.[23] Her fifth and final film of 1999 was the acclaimed drama Magnolia,[56] a "giant mosaic" chronicling the lives of multiple characters over one day in Los Angeles.[57] Paul Thomas Anderson, in his follow-up to Boogie Nights, wrote a role specifically for Moore. His primary objective was to "see her explode", and he cast her as a morphine-addicted wife.[57] Moore has said it was a particularly difficult role, but she was rewarded with a SAG nomination.[11][39] She was subsequently named Best Supporting Actress of 1999 by the National Board of Review, in recognition of her three performances in Magnolia, An Ideal Husband, and A Map of the World.[58] Apart from a cameo role in the comedy The Ladies Man, Moore's only other appearance in 2000 was in a short-film adaptation of Samuel Beckett's play Not I.[59] In early 2001, she appeared as FBI Agent Clarice Starling
Clarice Starling
in Hannibal, a sequel to the Oscar winning film The Silence of the Lambs. Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
had declined to reprise the role, and director Ridley Scott
Ridley Scott
eventually cast Moore, over Angelina Jolie, Cate Blanchett, Gillian Anderson, and Helen Hunt.[15] The change in actress received considerable attention from the press, but Moore claimed she was not interested in upstaging Foster.[15] Despite mixed reviews,[60][61] Hannibal earned $58 million in its opening weekend and finished as the tenth-highest-grossing film of the year.[62][63] Moore starred in three more 2001 releases: with David Duchovny
David Duchovny
in the science fiction–comedy Evolution, in her husband's dramatic film World Traveler, and with Kevin Spacey, Judi Dench, and Cate Blanchett in The Shipping News. All three films were poorly received.[64][65][66] The year 2002 marked a high point in Moore's career,[67] as she became the ninth performer to be nominated for two Academy Awards in the same year.[68] She received a Best Actress nomination for the melodrama Far from Heaven, in which she played a 1950s housewife whose world is shaken when her husband reveals he is gay. The role was written specifically for her by Todd Haynes, the first time the pair had worked together since Safe, and Moore described it as "a very, very personal project ... such an incredible honor to do."[69] David Rooney of Variety praised her "beautifully gauged performance" of a desperate woman "buckling under social pressures and putting on a brave face".[70] Manohla Dargis of the Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles Times
wrote, "what Moore does with her role is so beyond the parameters of what we call great acting that it nearly defies categorization."[71] The role won Moore the Best Actress award from 19 different organizations, including the Venice Film Festival
Venice Film Festival
and the National Board of Review. Moore's second Oscar nomination that year came for The Hours, which she co-starred in with Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
and Meryl Streep. She again played a troubled 1950s housewife, prompting Kenneth Turan to write that she was "essentially reprising her Far from Heaven
Far from Heaven
role".[72] Moore said it was an "unfortunate coincidence" that the similar roles came at the same time, and claimed that the characters had differing personalities.[73] Peter Travers
Peter Travers
of Rolling Stone
Rolling Stone
called the performance "wrenching",[74] while Peter Bradshaw of The Guardian praised a "superbly controlled, humane performance".[75] The Hours was nominated for nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture. Moore also received BAFTA and SAG Award nominations for Best Supporting Actress, and was jointly awarded the Silver Bear for Best Actress
Silver Bear for Best Actress
with Kidman and Streep at the Berlin Film Festival. Established actress (2003–09)[edit]

Moore at a festival for Jerrold Nadler
Jerrold Nadler
in 2007

Moore did not make any screen appearances in 2003, but returned in 2004 with three films. There was no success in her first two ventures of the year: Marie and Bruce, a dark comedy co-starring Matthew Broderick, did not get a cinematic release;[76] Laws of Attraction followed, where she played opposite Pierce Brosnan
Pierce Brosnan
in a courtroom-based romantic comedy, but the film was panned by critics.[77] Commercial success returned to Moore with The Forgotten, a psychological thriller in which she played a mother who is told her dead son never existed. Although the film was unpopular with critics, it opened as the US box office number one.[78][79] In 2005, Moore worked with her husband for the third time in the comedy Trust the Man,[16] and starred in the true story of a 1950s housewife, The Prize Winner of Defiance, Ohio.[80] Her first release of 2006 was Freedomland, a mystery co-starring Samuel L. Jackson. The response was overwhelmingly negative[81] but her follow-up, Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men
Children of Men
(2006), was highly acclaimed.[82] Moore had a supporting role in the dystopian drama, playing the leader of an activist group. It is listed on Rotten Tomatoes
Rotten Tomatoes
as one of the best reviewed films of her career, and was named by Peter Travers
Peter Travers
as the second best film of the decade.[83][84] Moore made her Broadway debut in the world premiere of David Hare's play The Vertical Hour. The production, directed by Sam Mendes
Sam Mendes
and co-starring Bill Nighy, opened in November 2006. Moore played the role of Nadia, a former war correspondent who finds her views on the 2003 invasion of Iraq challenged.[85] Ben Brantley of The New York Times was unenthusiastic about the production, and described Moore as miscast: in his opinion, she failed to bring the "tough, assertive" quality that Nadia required.[86] David Rooney of Variety criticized her "lack of stage technique", adding that she appeared "stiffly self-conscious".[85] Moore later confessed that she found performing on Broadway difficult and had not connected with the medium, but was glad to have experimented with it.[10] The play closed in March 2007 after 117 performances.[87] Moore played an FBI agent for the second time in Next (2007), a science fiction action film co-starring Nicolas Cage
Nicolas Cage
and Jessica Biel. Based on a short story by Philip K. Dick, the response from critics was highly negative.[88] Manhola Dargis wrote, "Ms. Moore seems terribly unhappy to be here, and it's no wonder."[89] The actress has since described it as her worst film.[8] Next was followed by Savage Grace (2007), the true story of Barbara Daly Baekeland—a high-society mother whose Oedipal relationship with her son ended in murder. Moore was fascinated by the role.[31] Savage Grace
Savage Grace
had a limited release, and received predominantly negative reviews.[90][91] Peter Bradshaw, however, called it a "coldly brilliant and tremendously acted movie."[92]

Moore at the 66th Venice Film Festival, 2009, with A Single Man co-star Colin Firth

I'm Not There
I'm Not There
(2007) saw Moore work with Todd Haynes
Todd Haynes
for the third time. The film explored the life of Bob Dylan, with Moore playing a character based on Joan Baez.[93] In 2008, she starred with Mark Ruffalo in Blindness, a dystopian thriller from the director Fernando Meirelles. The film was not widely seen, and critics were generally unenthusiastic.[94][95] Moore was not seen on screen again until late 2009, with three new releases. She had a supporting role in The Private Lives of Pippa Lee, and then starred in the erotic thriller Chloe with Amanda Seyfried
Amanda Seyfried
and Liam Neeson.[23] Shortly afterwards, she appeared in the well-received drama A Single Man.[96] Set in 1960s Los Angeles, the film starred Colin Firth
Colin Firth
as a homosexual professor who wishes to end his life. Moore played his best friend, "a fellow English expat and semi-alcoholic divorcee",[97] a character that Tom Ford, the film's writer–director, created with her in mind.[10] Leslie Felperin of Variety commented that it was Moore's best role in "some time", and was impressed by the "extraordinary emotional nuance" of the performance.[98] A Single Man
A Single Man
was named one of the 10 best films of the year by the American Film Institute,[99] and Moore received a fifth Golden Globe nomination for her work.[39] Television and comedy (2010–13)[edit] Moore returned to television for the first time in 18 years when she played a guest role in the fourth season of 30 Rock. She appeared in five episodes of the Emmy-winning comedy, playing Nancy Donovan, a love interest for Alec Baldwin's character Jack Donaghy.[100] She later appeared in the series finale in January 2013.[101] She also returned to As the World Turns, making a cameo appearance as Frannie Hughes at the end of the show's run in 2010.[14] Her first big-screen appearance of the new decade was Shelter (2010), a film described as "heinous" by Tim Robey of The Telegraph.[102] The psychological thriller received negative reviews and did not have a US release until 2013 (retitled 6 Souls).[103] Moore next starred with Annette Bening
Annette Bening
in the independent film[104] The Kids Are All Right (2010), a comedy–drama about a lesbian couple whose teenage children locate their sperm donor. The role of Jules Allgood was written for her by writer–director Lisa Cholodenko, who felt that Moore was the right age, adept at both drama and comedy, and confident with the film's sexual content.[105] The actress was drawn to the film's "universal" depiction of married life, and committed to the project in 2005.[105] The Kids Are All Right was widely acclaimed, eventually garnering an Oscar nomination for Best Picture.[106] The critic Betsy Sharkey praised Moore's performance of Jules, who she called an "existential bundle of unrealized need and midlife uncertainty", writing, "There are countless moments when the actress strips bare before the camera—sometimes literally, sometimes emotionally ... and Moore plays every note perfectly."[107] The Kids Are All Right earned Moore a sixth Golden Globe Award nomination and a second BAFTA nomination for Best Actress.

"I read her biography, books that were written about her and the election, listened to her voice endlessly on my iPod and worked with a vocal coach. I basically immersed myself in the study of her, and attempted to authenticate her as completely as possible ... It was tremendously challenging to represent someone so very well-known and idiosyncratic, and so recently in the public eye."

—Moore discussing her portrayal of Sarah Palin
Sarah Palin
in Game Change[108]

For her next project, Moore actively looked for another comedy.[109] She had a supporting role in Crazy, Stupid, Love, playing the estranged wife of Steve Carell, which was favorably reviewed and earned $142.8 million worldwide.[110][111] Moore was not seen on screens again until March 2012, with a performance that received considerable praise and recognition. She starred in the HBO
HBO
television film Game Change, a dramatization of Sarah Palin's 2008 campaign to become Vice President. Portraying a well-known figure was something she found challenging; in preparation, she conducted extensive research and worked with a dialect coach for two months.[112] Although the response to the film was mixed, critics were highly appreciative of Moore's performance.[113] For the first time in her career, she received a Golden Globe, a Primetime Emmy, and a SAG Award. Moore made two film appearances in 2012. The drama Being Flynn, in which she supported Robert De Niro, had a limited release.[114] Greater success came for What Maisie Knew, the story of a young girl caught in the middle of her parents' divorce. Adapted from Henry James's novel and updated to the 21st century, the drama earned near-universal critical praise.[115] The role of Susanna, Maisie's rock-star mother, required Moore to sing on camera, which was a challenge she embraced despite finding it embarrassing.[116] She called Susanna a terrible parent, but said the role did not make her uncomfortable as she fully compartmentalized the character: "I know that that's not me".[116][117] Following her well-received performance in What Maisie Knew,[115] Moore began 2013 with a supporting role in Joseph Gordon-Levitt's comedy Don Jon, playing an older woman who helps the title character to appreciate his relationships. Reviews for the film were favorable,[118] and Mary Pols of Time magazine wrote that Moore was a key factor in its success.[119] Her next appearance was a starring role in the comedy The English Teacher (2013), but this outing was poorly received and earned little at the box office.[120] In October 2013, she played the demented mother Margaret White in Carrie, an adaptation of Stephen King's horror novel.[121] Coming 37 years after Brian De Palma's well-known take on the book,[122] Moore stated that she wanted to make the role her own. By drawing on King's writing rather than the 1976 film,[123] Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle wrote that she managed to "[suggest] a history – one never told, just hinted at – of serious damage in [Margaret's] past."[121] The film was a box office success, but was generally considered an unsuccessful and unnecessary adaptation.[124][125] Awards success and film series (2014–present)[edit]

Moore at the 2014 Cannes Film Festival, where she won the Best Actress prize for Maps to the Stars

At 53 years old, Moore enjoyed a considerable degree of critical and commercial success in 2014. Her first release of the year came alongside Liam Neeson
Liam Neeson
in the action–thriller Non-Stop, set aboard an airplane. The response to the film was mixed but it earned $223 million worldwide.[126][127] She followed this by winning the Best Actress award at the Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
for her portrayal of Havana Segrand, an ageing actress receiving psychotherapy in David Cronenberg's black comedy Maps to the Stars.[128] Described by The Guardian as a "grotesque, gaudy and ruthless" character, Moore based her role on "an amalgam of Hollywood
Hollywood
casualties she ha[d] encountered" and drew upon her early experiences in the industry.[129] Peter Debruge of Variety criticized the film but found Moore to be "incredible" and "fearless" in it.[130] Moore's success at Cannes made her the second actress in history, after Juliette Binoche, to win at the "Big Three" film festivals (Cannes, Venice, and Berlin).[131] She also received a Golden Globe nomination for the performance.[132] Moore played the supporting role of President Alma Coin, the leader of a rebellion against The Capitol, in the third installment of the lucrative Hunger Games film series, Mockingjay – Part 1. The film ranks as her highest-grossing to date.[42] Her final appearance of 2014 was one of the most acclaimed of her career. In the drama Still Alice, Moore played the leading role of a linguistics professor diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's
disease.[133] She spent four months training for the film, by watching documentaries on the disease and interacting with patients at the Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's
Association.[134] Critic David Thomson wrote that Moore was "extraordinary at revealing the gradual loss of memory and confidence", while according to Kenneth Turan she was "especially good at the wordless elements of this transformation, allowing us to see through the changing contours of her face what it is like when your mind empties out."[135][136] Several critics commented that it was her finest performance to date,[137] and Moore was awarded with the Oscar, Golden Globe, SAG and BAFTA for Best Actress. Moore began 2015 by appearing as an evil queen in Seventh Son, a poorly received fantasy–adventure film co-starring Jeff Bridges.[138] She also appeared opposite Ellen Page
Ellen Page
in Freeheld, a drama based on a true story about a detective and her same-sex partner,[139] and in the romantic comedy Maggie's Plan, with Greta Gerwig and Ethan Hawke. Both films were presented at the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival in September 2015.[140] In Maggie's Plan, Moore played a pretentious Danish professor, a comic role which critic Richard Lawson of Vanity Fair deemed as the film's "chief pleasure".[141] Later that year, she reprised her role as Alma Coin in The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2, the final film of the series.[142]

Moore at an event for Suburbicon in 2017

After a one-year absence from the screen, Moore had three film releases in 2017. She appeared in a dual role in Wonderstruck, a film adaptation of Brian Selznick's historical children's novel of the same name, which reteamed her with Todd Haynes. Her parts were of a silent movie star in the 1920s and a deaf librarian in the 1970s; in preparation, she studied sign language and watched the films of Lillian Gish.[143][144] Richard Lawson considered her to be "eminently watchable" despite her limited screen time.[145] Moore portrayed a dual role for the second time that year in Suburbicon, a satirical thriller written by the Coen brothers
Coen brothers
and directed by George Clooney. She was cast opposite Matt Damon
Matt Damon
as twin sisters in 1950s America, named Rose and Margaret, who become embroiled in a local crime.[143] The film received negative reviews, with critics saying it failed to effectively portray American racism, but Geoffrey Macnab of The Independent praised Moore for giving "a perfectly judged comic performance as a Barbara Stanwyck-like femme fatale".[146][147] Moore's final release of the year was the sequel to the 2015 spy film Kingsman: The Secret Service, subtitled The Golden Circle, co-starring Colin Firth, Taron Egerton, Channing Tatum
Channing Tatum
and Halle Berry.[148] She played the part of the villainous entrepreneur Poppy Adams, who runs a drug cartel. Despite her character's actions, Moore played the part to make Poppy seem "strange but reasonable".[143] Peter Debruge described the film as "outlandish" and wrote that Moore had played her part "as Martha Stewart
Martha Stewart
crossed with a demonic 1950s housewife".[149] The film earned over $400 million worldwide.[150] As of December 2017, Moore will star in Bel Canto, a thriller based on Ann Patchett’s novel of the same name about the Japanese embassy hostage crisis.[151] She has also committed to play the titular character in Gloria, a remake of the Chilean film of the same name, about a middle-aged divorcée's quest for love, and will star as the feminist icon Gloria Steinem
Gloria Steinem
in the biopic My Life on the Road.[152][153] Reception and acting style[edit] Moore has been described in the media as one of the most talented and accomplished actresses of her generation.[1][4][38] As a woman in her 50s, she is unusual in being an older actress who continues to work regularly and in prominent roles.[154] She enjoys the variety of appearing in both low-budget independent films and large-scale Hollywood
Hollywood
productions.[10][37] In 2004, an IGN
IGN
journalist wrote of this "rare ability to bounce between commercially viable projects like Nine Months
Nine Months
to art house masterpieces like Safe unscathed", adding, "She is respected in art houses and multiplexes alike."[155] She is noted for playing in a range of material,[4][37][156] and the director Ridley Scott, who worked with Moore on Hannibal, has praised her versatility.[15] In October 2013, Moore was honored with a star on the Hollywood
Hollywood
Walk of Fame.[13] She has been included in People magazine's annual beauty lists on four occasions (1995, 2003, 2008, 2013).[157] In 2015, Time magazine named Moore one of the 100 most influential people in the world on the annual Time 100
Time 100
list.[158]

"I never care that [my characters] are 'strong'. I never care that they're even affirmative. I look for that thing that's human and recognizable and emotional. You know, we're not perfect, we're not heroic, we're not in control. We're our own worst enemies sometimes, we cause our own tragedies ... that's the stuff that I think is really compelling."

—Moore explaining why she is drawn to playing troubled women[11]

Moore is particularly known for playing troubled women, and specializes in "ordinary women who suppress powerful emotions".[1][156] Oliver Burkeman
Oliver Burkeman
of The Guardian
The Guardian
writes that her characters are typically "struggling to maintain a purchase on normality in the face of some secret anguish or creeping awareness of failure".[16] Suzie Mackenzie, also of The Guardian, has identified a theme of "characters in a state of alienation ... women who have forgotten or lost themselves. People whose identity is a question."[4] Her performances often include small hints at emotional turmoil, until there comes a point when the character breaks.[5][16][159] The journalist Kira Cochrane
Kira Cochrane
has identified this as a "trademark moment" in many of her best films,[5] while it has led Burkeman to call her the "queen of the big-screen breakdown".[16] "When she does finally crack," writes journalist Simon Hattenstone, "it's a sight to behold: nobody sobs from the soul quite like Moore."[8] Ben Brantley of The New York Times has praised Moore's ability to subtly reveal the inner-turmoil of her characters, writing that she is "peerless" in her "portraits of troubled womanhood."[159] When it comes to more authoritative roles, Brantley believes she is "a bit of a bore".[159] "Emotional nakedness is Ms. Moore's specialty," he says, "and it's here that you sense the magic she is capable of."[86] An interest in portraying "actual human drama" has led Moore to these roles.[10][11] She is particularly moved by the concept of an individual repressing their troubles and striving to maintain dignity.[1] Parts where the character achieves an amazing feat are of little interest to her, because "we're just not very often in that position in our lives."[16] Early in her career, Moore established a reputation for pushing boundaries,[5] and she continues to be praised for her "fearless" performances and for taking on difficult roles.[10][160] When asked if there are any roles she has avoided, she replied, "Nothing within the realm of human behaviour."[5] She is known for her willingness to perform nude and appear in sex scenes,[8][12] although she has said she will only do so if she feels it fits the role.[10][160] Regarding her approach to acting, Moore said in a 2002 interview that she leaves 95 percent of the performance to be discovered on set: "I want to have a sense of who a character is, and then I want to get there and have it happen to me on camera." The aim, she said, is to "try to get yourself in a position to let the emotion [happen] to you, that you don't bring the emotion to it ... and when it happens, there's nothing better or more exciting or more rewarding."[11] Writing[edit]

Moore at the 2008 Tribeca Film Festival

Alongside her acting work, Moore has established a career as a children's author. Her first book, Freckleface Strawberry, was published in October 2007 and became a New York Times Best Seller.[161][162] Described by Time Out as a "simple, sweet and semi-autobiographical narrative", it tells the story of a girl who wishes to be rid of her freckles but eventually accepts them.[163] Moore decided to write the book when her young son began disliking aspects of his appearance; she was reminded of her own childhood, when she was teased for having freckles and called "Freckleface Strawberry" by other children.[164] The book has turned into a series with six follow-ups as of 2016[update]: Freckleface Strawberry and the Dodgeball Bully was published in 2009, and Freckleface Strawberry: Best Friends Forever in 2011.[165] Both carry the message that children can overcome their own problems.[166] Freckleface Strawberry: Backpacks!, Freckleface Strawberry: Lunch, or What's That? and Feckleface Strawberry: Loose Tooth! were released as part of Random House publishers' "Step Into Reading" program.[167][168] These were followed by Freckleface Strawberry and the Really Big Voice in summer 2016.[169] Freckleface Strawberry has been adapted into a musical, written by Rose Caiola and Gary Kupper, which premiered at the New World Stages, New York, in October 2010.[170] Moore had an input in the production, particularly through requesting that it retain the book's young target audience.[171] The show has since been licensed and performed at several venues, which she calls "extremely gratifying and extremely flattering".[166] Moore has written one children's book separate from the Freckleface Strawberry series. Released in 2013, My Mom is a Foreigner, But Not to Me is based on her experiences of growing up with a mother from another country.[172][173] The book had a negative reception from Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly
and Kirkus Reviews; while recognizing it as well-intentioned, Moore's use of verse and rhyme was criticised.[174] Personal life[edit]

Moore at the 2008 Toronto International Film Festival

Actor and stage director John Gould Rubin was Moore's first husband, whom she met in 1984 and married two years later.[14] They separated in 1993,[4] and their divorce was finalized in August 1995.[4][14] "I got married too early and I really didn't want to be there", she has since explained.[2] Moore began a relationship with Bart Freundlich, her director on The Myth of Fingerprints, in 1996.[1] The couple have a son, Caleb (born December 1997) and a daughter, Liv (born April 2002).[175] They wed in August 2003 and live in Greenwich Village, New York City.[14] Moore has commented, "We have a very solid family life, and it is the most satisfying thing I have ever done."[31] She tries to keep her family close when working and picks material that is practical for her as a parent.[1][5] Moore is politically liberal[8] and supported Barack Obama
Barack Obama
at the 2008 and 2012 presidential elections.[31][176] She is a pro-choice activist and sits on the board of advocates for Planned Parenthood.[16][31] She is also a campaigner for gay rights[5] and gun control,[17] and since 2008 she has been an Artist Ambassador for Save the Children.[177] Moore is an atheist;[17] when asked on Inside the Actors Studio
Inside the Actors Studio
what God might say to her upon arrival at heaven, she gave God's response as, "Well I guess you were wrong, I do exist."[11] Filmography[edit] Main article: Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
filmography As of October 2017[update], Moore has appeared in 62 feature films, four television movies, and four television series. Her most acclaimed films, according to review-aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes, include:[83]

Short Cuts
Short Cuts
(1993) Vanya on 42nd Street
Vanya on 42nd Street
(1994) Safe (1995) Boogie Nights
Boogie Nights
(1997) The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski
(1998) Magnolia (1999) The Hours (2002) Far from Heaven
Far from Heaven
(2002) Children of Men
Children of Men
(2006) A Single Man
A Single Man
(2009) The Kids Are All Right (2010) What Maisie Knew
What Maisie Knew
(2012) Still Alice
Still Alice
(2014)

Her films that have earned the most at the box office are:[42]

The Hand That Rocks the Cradle (1992) The Fugitive (1993) Nine Months
Nine Months
(1995) The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) Hannibal (2001) The Forgotten (2004) Crazy, Stupid, Love
Crazy, Stupid, Love
(2011) Non-Stop (2014) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1 (2014) The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 (2015) Kingsman: The Golden Circle (2017)

Awards and nominations[edit] Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Julianne Moore Moore has received five Academy Award
Academy Award
nominations, nine Golden Globe nominations, seven SAG nominations, and four BAFTA nominations. From these, she has won an Academy Award, two Golden Globes, a BAFTA, and two SAG Awards; she also has a Primetime Emmy and a Daytime Emmy. In addition, she has been named Best Actress at the Cannes Film Festival, Berlin Film Festival, and Venice Film Festival – the fourth person, and second female, in history to achieve this.[131] Her recognized roles came in As the World Turns, Boogie Nights, An Ideal Husband, The End of the Affair, Magnolia, Far From Heaven, The Hours, A Single Man, The Kids Are All Right, Game Change, Maps to the Stars, and Still Alice. Published works[edit]

Moore, Julianne (2007). Freckleface Strawberry. Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Bloomsbury Juvenile US. ISBN 978-1-59990-107-7.  Moore, Julianne (2009). Freckleface Strawberry And The Dodgeball Bully. Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Bloomsbury Juvenile US. ISBN 978-1-59990-316-3.  Moore, Julianne (2011). Freckleface Strawberry Best Friends Forever. Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Bloomsbury Juvenile US. ISBN 978-1-59990-782-6.  Moore, Julianne (2013). My Mom Is a Foreigner, But Not to Me. Illustrated by Meilo So. San Francisco: Chronicle Books. ISBN 978-1-4521-0792-9.  Moore, Julianne (2015). Freckleface Strawberry: Backpacks! (Step into Reading). Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers. ISBN 978-0-385-39194-8.  Moore, Julianne (2015). Freckleface Strawberry: Lunch, or What's That? (Step into Reading). Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers. ISBN 978-0-385-39191-7.  Moore, Julianne (2016). Freckleface Strawberry: Loose Tooth! (Step into Reading). Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers. ISBN 978-0385391979.  Moore, Julianne (2016). Freckleface Strawberry and the Really Big Voice. Illustrated by LeUyen Pham. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers. ISBN 978-0385392037. 

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Boards Adaptation of 'Alice' Novel". Variety. Retrieved November 28, 2013.  ^ Smith, Nigel M. (December 12, 2014). "How Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Pulled Off Her Devastating Performance in 'Still Alice'". Indiewire. Retrieved December 13, 2014.  ^ Thomson, David (December 3, 2014). "'Still Alice' Isn't the Year's Best Film But It May Be the Most Important". New Republic. Retrieved January 18, 2015.  ^ Turan, Kenneth (December 4, 2014). "'Still Alice' powerfully presents a mind falling to Alzheimer's". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved January 18, 2015.  ^ Young, Deborah (August 9, 2014). "'Still Alice': Toronto Review". The Hollywood
Hollywood
Reporter. Retrieved February 7, 2015.  Ehrlich, David (December 2, 2014). "Still Alice". Time Out. Retrieved February 7, 2015.  Lacey, Liam (January 23, 2014). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
masters Alzheimer's disappearing act in Still Alice". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved February 7, 2015.  ^ "Seventh Son". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved February 7, 2015.  ^ Lee, Benjamin (July 23, 2015). "First trailer for Oscar-tipped Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
gay rights drama Freeheld". The Guardian. Retrieved September 11, 2015.  ^ Fleming Jr, Mike (January 15, 2014). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
To Star With Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
In Rebecca Miller-Helmed 'Maggie's Plan'". Deadline. Retrieved January 19, 2014.  ^ Lawson, Richard (September 13, 2015). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Shows Off Her Delightful Comedy Chops in Maggie's Plan". Vanity Fair. Retrieved January 27, 2016.  ^ Goldblatt, Daniel (September 13, 2013). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Cast in 'The Hunger Games: Mockingjay'". Variety. Retrieved September 13, 2013.  ^ a b c Ray, Leigh Beltz. "The Woman of Many Faces". InStyle. Retrieved September 9, 2017.  ^ Keegan, Rebecca (May 18, 2017). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
on the "Incredible Privilege" of Playing a Deaf Role in Wonderstruck". Vanity Fair. Retrieved September 9, 2017.  ^ Lawson, Richard (May 18, 2017). "Wonderstruck Is a Beautiful, Twee Children's Art Film". Vanity Fair. Retrieved September 9, 2017.  ^ " Suburbicon (2017)". Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved September 9, 2017.  ^ Macnab, Geoffrey (September 3, 2017). "Suburbicon, Venice Film Festival review: The darker the storytelling becomes, the funnier the movie gets". The Independent. Retrieved September 9, 2017.  ^ Mendelson, Scott (April 14, 2016). "Why 'Kingsman: The Golden Circle' Could Be The Next 'Dark Knight'-Style Breakout Sequel". Forbes. Retrieved April 20, 2016.  ^ Debruge, Peter (September 18, 2017). "Film Review: 'Kingsman: The Golden Circle'". Variety. Retrieved September 19, 2017.  ^ "Kingsman: The Golden Circle (2017)". Box Office Mojo. Retrieved January 13, 2018.  ^ "Berlin: Bloom's 'Bel Canto' Adds Trio to Drama's Cast". Variety. February 8, 2017. Retrieved March 31, 2017.  ^ Ramos, Dino-Ray (November 29, 2017). "Sean Astin Joins Julianne Moore In 'Gloria'". Deadline.com. Retrieved December 3, 2017.  ^ Fisher, Lauren Alexis (November 2, 2017). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
To Play Gloria Steinem
Gloria Steinem
In Upcoming Biopic". Harper's Bazaar. Retrieved December 3, 2017.  ^ Lipworth, Elaine (September 19, 2011). "Julianne Moore: marriage is really hard". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved March 10, 2013.  ^ Otto, Jeff (April 29, 2004). "Interview: Julianne Moore". IGN. Archived from the original on August 26, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2013.  ^ a b Sgura, Giampaolo (August 16, 2013). "Exclusive Peek: Julianne Moore Opens Up on Fashion, Fame and Family in October InStyle". InStyle. Archived from the original on September 24, 2013. Retrieved September 24, 2013.  ^ "Most Beautiful—Julianne Moore". People. May 8, 1995. Retrieved August 17, 2014.  Tauber, Michelle (May 12, 2003). "50 Most Beautiful People". People. Retrieved August 17, 2014.  "World's Most Beautiful People—Julianne Moore". People. April 30, 2008. Retrieved August 17, 2014.  "Most Beautiful 2013". People. April 18, 2013. Retrieved August 17, 2014.  ^ http://time.com/3822884/julianne-moore-2015-time-100/ ^ a b c Brantley, Ben (March 9, 2003). "OSCAR FILMS: The Housewife and the Butcher; In the Art of Julianne Moore, Serenity Masks the Panic". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 26, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2013.  ^ a b Iley, Chrissy (July 6, 2008). "Red Alert". The Observer. Archived from the original on February 16, 2013. Retrieved July 15, 2013.  ^ "Freckleface Strawberry, Musical". Joseph Weinberger Ltd. Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2013.  ^ Moore, Julianne (2007). Freckleface Strawberry. Bloomsbury. ISBN 978-1-59990-107-7.  ^ Snook, Raven (August 18, 2012). "Freckleface Strawberry the Musical". Time Out. Archived from the original on August 26, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2013.  ^ Hammel, Sara (October 21, 2007). "Julianne Moore's Old Nickname: Freckleface Strawberry". People. Archived from the original on January 17, 2013. Retrieved July 15, 2013.  ^ "Freckleface Strawberry". Bloomsbury Publishing. Retrieved March 3, 2013.  ^ a b Ellis, Kori (March 22, 2013). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
dishes on motherhood and Freckleface Strawberry". Sheknows. Archived from the original on August 25, 2013. Retrieved August 25, 2013.  ^ Davis, Jennifer (May 29, 2015). "Cue the Aww's! Julianne Moore's Latest Freckleface Strawberry Book Hits Stands". In Style. Retrieved September 10, 2015.  ^ "Books". Freckleface Strawberry. Retrieved September 10, 2015.  ^ "Freckleface Strawberry and the Really Big Voice". Good Reads. Retrieved September 24, 2016.  ^ Graeber, Laurel (October 19, 2010). "An Ugly Duckling Gets Her Ginger Up Over Fitting In". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 26, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2013.  ^ Itzkoff, Dave (July 20, 2010). "Julianne Moore's New Musical Is All Right for the Kids". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 16, 2013. Retrieved August 22, 2013.  ^ Cericola, Rachel (March 18, 2013). " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
on Work, Being a Mom, and Freckleface Strawberry". Wired. Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2013.  ^ " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
Recommends These Books for You". Redbook. Archived from the original on August 25, 2013. Retrieved August 25, 2013.  ^ "My Mom Is a Foreigner, But Not to Me". Barnes & Noble. Retrieved September 13, 2013.  ^ "Julianne Moore". Us Weekly. Archived from the original on May 16, 2012. Retrieved July 30, 2012.  ^ Harp, Justin (October 2, 2012). "Beyoncé, Jennifer Lopez support Barack Obama
Barack Obama
in campaign video – watch". Digital Spy. Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved April 2, 2013.  ^ "Look Who's Helping Save the Children". Save the Children. Archived from the original on October 22, 2012. Retrieved March 9, 2013. 

United States portal

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Julianne Moore.

Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
on IMDb Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
at the Internet Off-Broadway Database Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
at AllMovie " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
collected news and commentary". The New York Times.  " Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
collected news and commentary". The Guardian.  Freckleface Strawberry. Official website for Moore's book series.

Awards for Julianne Moore

v t e

Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Actress

1928–1950

Janet Gaynor
Janet Gaynor
(1928) Mary Pickford
Mary Pickford
(1929) Norma Shearer
Norma Shearer
(1930) Marie Dressler
Marie Dressler
(1931) Helen Hayes
Helen Hayes
(1932) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1933) Claudette Colbert
Claudette Colbert
(1934) Bette Davis
Bette Davis
(1935) Luise Rainer
Luise Rainer
(1936) Luise Rainer
Luise Rainer
(1937) Bette Davis
Bette Davis
(1938) Vivien Leigh
Vivien Leigh
(1939) Ginger Rogers
Ginger Rogers
(1940) Joan Fontaine
Joan Fontaine
(1941) Greer Garson
Greer Garson
(1942) Jennifer Jones
Jennifer Jones
(1943) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1944) Joan Crawford
Joan Crawford
(1945) Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland
(1946) Loretta Young
Loretta Young
(1947) Jane Wyman
Jane Wyman
(1948) Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland
(1949) Judy Holliday
Judy Holliday
(1950)

1951–1975

Vivien Leigh
Vivien Leigh
(1951) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1952) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
(1953) Grace Kelly
Grace Kelly
(1954) Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
(1955) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1956) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1957) Susan Hayward
Susan Hayward
(1958) Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
(1959) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1960) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
(1961) Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
(1962) Patricia Neal
Patricia Neal
(1963) Julie Andrews
Julie Andrews
(1964) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(1965) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1966) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1967) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
/ Barbra Streisand
Barbra Streisand
(1968) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1969) Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson
(1970) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1971) Liza Minnelli
Liza Minnelli
(1972) Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson
(1973) Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
(1974) Louise Fletcher
Louise Fletcher
(1975)

1976–2000

Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
(1976) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(1977) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1978) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1979) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(1980) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1981) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1982) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1983) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1984) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1985) Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
(1986) Cher
Cher
(1987) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1988) Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
(1989) Kathy Bates
Kathy Bates
(1990) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1991) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1994) Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1995) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt
(1997) Gwyneth Paltrow
Gwyneth Paltrow
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000)

2001–present

Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2001) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(2004) Reese Witherspoon
Reese Witherspoon
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2011) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Emma Stone
Emma Stone
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

AACTA International Award for Best Actress

Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2011) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2015) Emma Stone
Emma Stone
(2016) Margot Robbie
Margot Robbie
(2017)

v t e

BAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role

1952–1967

Vivien Leigh
Vivien Leigh
British, Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
Foreign (1952) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
British, Leslie Caron
Leslie Caron
Foreign (1953) Yvonne Mitchell
Yvonne Mitchell
British, Cornell Borchers
Cornell Borchers
Foreign (1954) Katie Johnson British, Betsy Blair
Betsy Blair
Foreign (1955) Virginia
Virginia
McKenna British, Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
Foreign (1956) Heather Sears
Heather Sears
British, Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
Foreign (1957) Irene Worth
Irene Worth
British, Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
Foreign (1958) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
British, Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
Foreign (1959) Rachel Roberts British, Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
Foreign (1960) Dora Bryan
Dora Bryan
British, Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
Foreign (1961) Leslie Caron
Leslie Caron
British, Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
Foreign (1962) Rachel Roberts British, Patricia Neal
Patricia Neal
Foreign (1963) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
British, Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
Foreign (1964) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
British, Patricia Neal
Patricia Neal
Foreign (1965) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
British, Jeanne Moreau
Jeanne Moreau
Foreign (1966) Edith Evans
Edith Evans
British, Anouk Aimée
Anouk Aimée
Foreign (1967)

1968–present

Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1968) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1969) Katharine Ross
Katharine Ross
(1970) Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson
(1971) Liza Minnelli
Liza Minnelli
(1972) Stéphane Audran (1973) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1974) Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
(1975) Louise Fletcher
Louise Fletcher
(1976) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(1977) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1978) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1979) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1980) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1981) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1982) Julie Walters
Julie Walters
(1983) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1984) Peggy Ashcroft
Peggy Ashcroft
(1985) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1986) Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
(1987) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(1988) Pauline Collins
Pauline Collins
(1989) Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
(1990) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1991) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Brenda Blethyn
Brenda Blethyn
(1996) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(1997) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(1998) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(2001) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2002) Scarlett Johansson
Scarlett Johansson
(2003) Imelda Staunton
Imelda Staunton
(2004) Reese Witherspoon
Reese Witherspoon
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Carey Mulligan
Carey Mulligan
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2011) Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Emma Stone
Emma Stone
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

Boston Society of Film Critics Award for Best Actress

Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1980) Marília Pêra
Marília Pêra
(1981) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1982) Rosanna Arquette
Rosanna Arquette
(1983) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1984) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1985) Chloe Webb
Chloe Webb
(1986) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1987) Melanie Griffith
Melanie Griffith
(1988) Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
(1989) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1990) Geena Davis
Geena Davis
(1991) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(1994) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(1995) Brenda Blethyn
Brenda Blethyn
(1996) Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter
(1997) Samantha Morton
Samantha Morton
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
(2000) Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
(2001) Maggie Gyllenhaal
Maggie Gyllenhaal
(2002) Scarlett Johansson
Scarlett Johansson
(2003) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(2004) Reese Witherspoon
Reese Witherspoon
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2008) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Michelle Williams (2011) Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2014) Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling
(2015) Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2016) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2017)

v t e

Cannes Film Festival
Cannes Film Festival
Award for Best Actress

1946–1975

Michèle Morgan
Michèle Morgan
(1946) Isa Miranda
Isa Miranda
(1949) Bette Davis
Bette Davis
(1951) Lee Grant
Lee Grant
(1952) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1953) cast of Bolshaya Semya (1955) Susan Hayward
Susan Hayward
(1956) Giulietta Masina
Giulietta Masina
(1957) Bibi Andersson
Bibi Andersson
/ Eva Dahlbeck
Eva Dahlbeck
/ Barbro Hiort af Ornäs / Ingrid Thulin (1958) Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
(1959) Melina Mercouri
Melina Mercouri
/ Jeanne Moreau
Jeanne Moreau
(1960) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
(1961) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
/ Rita Tushingham
Rita Tushingham
(1962) Marina Vlady
Marina Vlady
(1963) Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
/ Barbara Barrie
Barbara Barrie
(1964) Samantha Eggar
Samantha Eggar
(1965) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1966) Pia Degermark
Pia Degermark
(1967) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1969) Ottavia Piccolo
Ottavia Piccolo
(1970) Kitty Winn (1971) Susannah York
Susannah York
(1972) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1973) Marie-José Nat
Marie-José Nat
(1974) Valerie Perrine
Valerie Perrine
(1975)

1976–2000

Dominique Sanda
Dominique Sanda
/ Mari Törőcsik
Mari Törőcsik
(1976) Shelley Duvall
Shelley Duvall
/ Monique Mercure (1977) Jill Clayburgh
Jill Clayburgh
/ Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(1978) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1979) Anouk Aimée
Anouk Aimée
(1980) Isabelle Adjani
Isabelle Adjani
(1981) Jadwiga Jankowska-Cieślak
Jadwiga Jankowska-Cieślak
(1982) Hanna Schygulla
Hanna Schygulla
(1983) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(1984) Norma Aleandro
Norma Aleandro
/ Cher
Cher
(1985) Barbara Sukowa
Barbara Sukowa
/ Fernanda Torres
Fernanda Torres
(1986) Barbara Hershey
Barbara Hershey
(1987) Barbara Hershey
Barbara Hershey
/ Jodhi May / Linda Mvusi
Linda Mvusi
(1988) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1989) Krystyna Janda
Krystyna Janda
(1990) Irène Jacob
Irène Jacob
(1991) Pernilla August
Pernilla August
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Virna Lisi
Virna Lisi
(1994) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(1995) Brenda Blethyn
Brenda Blethyn
(1996) Kathy Burke (1997) Élodie Bouchez
Élodie Bouchez
/ Natacha Régnier
Natacha Régnier
(1998) Séverine Caneele
Séverine Caneele
/ Émilie Dequenne
Émilie Dequenne
(1999) Björk
Björk
(2000)

2001–present

Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2001) Kati Outinen (2002) Marie-Josée Croze
Marie-Josée Croze
(2003) Maggie Cheung
Maggie Cheung
(2004) Hana Laszlo
Hana Laszlo
(2005) Penélope Cruz
Penélope Cruz
/ Carmen Maura
Carmen Maura
/ Lola Dueñas
Lola Dueñas
/ Chus Lampreave
Chus Lampreave
/ Blanca Portillo / Yohana Cobo
Yohana Cobo
(2006) Jeon Do-yeon
Jeon Do-yeon
(2007) Sandra Corveloni (2008) Charlotte Gainsbourg
Charlotte Gainsbourg
(2009) Juliette Binoche
Juliette Binoche
(2010) Kirsten Dunst
Kirsten Dunst
(2011) Cristina Flutur / Cosmina Stratan (2012) Bérénice Bejo
Bérénice Bejo
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Emmanuelle Bercot
Emmanuelle Bercot
/ Rooney Mara
Rooney Mara
(2015) Jaclyn Jose (2016) Diane Kruger
Diane Kruger
(2017)

v t e

Critics' Choice Movie Award for Best Actress

Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(1995) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter
(1997) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(2004) Reese Witherspoon
Reese Witherspoon
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(2007) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
/ Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2008) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
/ Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Viola Davis
Viola Davis
(2011) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

Critics' Choice Television Award for Best Actress in a Movie/Miniseries

Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2012) Elisabeth Moss
Elisabeth Moss
(2013) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(2014) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2015) Kirsten Dunst
Kirsten Dunst
(2016) Sarah Paulson
Sarah Paulson
(2016) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2017)

v t e

Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Younger Actress in a Drama Series

Tracey E. Bregman (1985) Ellen Wheeler (1986) Martha Byrne
Martha Byrne
(1987) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(1988) Kimberly McCullough (1989) Cady McClain
Cady McClain
(1990) Anne Heche
Anne Heche
(1991) Tricia Cast
Tricia Cast
(1992) Heather Tom
Heather Tom
(1993) Melissa Hayden (1994) Sarah Michelle Gellar
Sarah Michelle Gellar
(1995) Kimberly McCullough (1996) Sarah Joy Brown (1997) Sarah Joy Brown (1998) Heather Tom
Heather Tom
(1999) Camryn Grimes (2000) Adrienne Frantz (2001) Jennifer Finnigan
Jennifer Finnigan
(2002) Jennifer Finnigan
Jennifer Finnigan
(2003) Jennifer Finnigan
Jennifer Finnigan
(2004) Eden Riegel
Eden Riegel
(2005) Jennifer Landon (2006) Jennifer Landon (2007) Jennifer Landon (2008) Julie Berman (2009) Julie Berman (2010) Brittany Allen
Brittany Allen
(2011) Christel Khalil (2012) Kristen Alderson (2013) Hunter King (2014) Hunter King (2015) True O'Brien (2016) Lexi Ainsworth (2017)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Judith Anderson
Judith Anderson
(1954) Mary Martin
Mary Martin
(1955) Claire Trevor
Claire Trevor
(1956) Polly Bergen
Polly Bergen
(1957) Julie Harris (1959) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1960) Judith Anderson
Judith Anderson
(1961) Julie Harris (1962) Kim Stanley
Kim Stanley
(1963) Shelley Winters
Shelley Winters
(1964) Lynn Fontanne
Lynn Fontanne
(1965) Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
(1966) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1967) Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton
(1968) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1969) Patty Duke
Patty Duke
(1970) Lee Grant
Lee Grant
(1971) Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson
(1972) Susan Hampshire
Susan Hampshire
/ Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1973) Cicely Tyson
Cicely Tyson
/ Mildred Natwick
Mildred Natwick
(1974) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
/ Jessica Walter
Jessica Walter
(1975) Susan Clark
Susan Clark
/ Rosemary Harris
Rosemary Harris
(1976) Sally Field
Sally Field
/ Patty Duke
Patty Duke
(1977) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
/ Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1978) Bette Davis
Bette Davis
(1979) Patty Duke
Patty Duke
(1980) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1981) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1982) Barbara Stanwyck
Barbara Stanwyck
(1983) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1984) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1985) Marlo Thomas
Marlo Thomas
(1986) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1987) Jessica Tandy
Jessica Tandy
(1988) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1989) Barbara Hershey
Barbara Hershey
(1990) Lynn Whitfield
Lynn Whitfield
(1991) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Kirstie Alley
Kirstie Alley
(1994) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(1995) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(1996) Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
(1997) Ellen Barkin
Ellen Barkin
(1998) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(1999) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2000) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(2001) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2002) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(2003) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2004) S. Epatha Merkerson
S. Epatha Merkerson
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2007) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2008) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(2009) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(2010) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2011) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2012) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2013) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(2014) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2015) Sarah Paulson
Sarah Paulson
(2016) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in a Motion Picture – Drama

Jennifer Jones
Jennifer Jones
(1943) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1944) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1945) Rosalind Russell
Rosalind Russell
(1946) Rosalind Russell
Rosalind Russell
(1947) Jane Wyman
Jane Wyman
(1948) Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland
(1949) Gloria Swanson
Gloria Swanson
(1950) Jane Wyman
Jane Wyman
(1951) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1952) Audrey Hepburn
Audrey Hepburn
(1953) Grace Kelly
Grace Kelly
(1954) Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
(1955) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1956) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1957) Susan Hayward
Susan Hayward
(1958) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1959) Greer Garson
Greer Garson
(1960) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1961) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1962) Leslie Caron
Leslie Caron
(1963) Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
(1964) Samantha Eggar
Samantha Eggar
(1965) Anouk Aimée
Anouk Aimée
(1966) Edith Evans
Edith Evans
(1967) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1968) Geneviève Bujold
Geneviève Bujold
(1969) Ali MacGraw
Ali MacGraw
(1970) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1971) Liv Ullmann
Liv Ullmann
(1972) Marsha Mason
Marsha Mason
(1973) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1974) Louise Fletcher
Louise Fletcher
(1975) Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
(1976) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1977) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1978) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1979) Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore
(1980) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1981) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1982) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1983) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1984) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1985) Marlee Matlin
Marlee Matlin
(1986) Sally Kirkland
Sally Kirkland
(1987) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
/ Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
/ Sigourney Weaver
Sigourney Weaver
(1988) Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
(1989) Kathy Bates
Kathy Bates
(1990) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1991) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1994) Sharon Stone
Sharon Stone
(1995) Brenda Blethyn
Brenda Blethyn
(1996) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(1997) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(2001) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(2004) Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2011) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

Golden Globe Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

Jane Seymour (1981) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1982) Ann-Margret
Ann-Margret
(1983) Ann-Margret
Ann-Margret
(1984) Liza Minnelli
Liza Minnelli
(1985) Loretta Young
Loretta Young
(1986) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1987) Ann Jillian
Ann Jillian
(1988) Christine Lahti
Christine Lahti
(1989) Barbara Hershey
Barbara Hershey
(1990) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1991) Laura Dern
Laura Dern
(1992) Bette Midler
Bette Midler
(1993) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1994) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1995) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(1996) Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
(1997) Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
(1998) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(1999) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(2000) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(2001) Uma Thurman
Uma Thurman
(2002) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2003) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(2004) S. Epatha Merkerson
S. Epatha Merkerson
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Queen Latifah
Queen Latifah
(2007) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2008) Drew Barrymore
Drew Barrymore
(2009) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(2010) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2011) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2012) Elisabeth Moss
Elisabeth Moss
(2013) Maggie Gyllenhaal
Maggie Gyllenhaal
(2014) Lady Gaga
Lady Gaga
(2015) Sarah Paulson
Sarah Paulson
(2016) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2017)

v t e

Hasty Pudding Woman of the Year

1951–1975

Gertrude Lawrence
Gertrude Lawrence
(1951) Barbara Bel Geddes
Barbara Bel Geddes
(1952) Mamie Eisenhower
Mamie Eisenhower
(1953) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1954) Debbie Reynolds
Debbie Reynolds
(1955) Peggy Ann Garner
Peggy Ann Garner
(1956) Carroll Baker
Carroll Baker
(1957) Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1958) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1959) Carol Lawrence
Carol Lawrence
(1960) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1961) Piper Laurie
Piper Laurie
(1962) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1963) Rosalind Russell
Rosalind Russell
(1964) Lee Remick
Lee Remick
(1965) Ethel Merman
Ethel Merman
(1966) Lauren Bacall
Lauren Bacall
(1967) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1968) Carol Burnett
Carol Burnett
(1969) Dionne Warwick
Dionne Warwick
(1970) Carol Channing
Carol Channing
(1971) Ruby Keeler
Ruby Keeler
(1972) Liza Minnelli
Liza Minnelli
(1973) Faye Dunaway
Faye Dunaway
(1974) Valerie Harper
Valerie Harper
(1975)

1976–2000

Bette Midler
Bette Midler
(1976) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1977) Beverly Sills
Beverly Sills
(1978) Candice Bergen
Candice Bergen
(1979) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1980) Mary Tyler Moore
Mary Tyler Moore
(1981) Ella Fitzgerald
Ella Fitzgerald
(1982) Julie Andrews
Julie Andrews
(1983) Joan Rivers
Joan Rivers
(1984) Cher
Cher
(1985) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1986) Bernadette Peters
Bernadette Peters
(1987) Lucille Ball
Lucille Ball
(1988) Kathleen Turner
Kathleen Turner
(1989) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(1990) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(1991) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1992) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1993) Meg Ryan
Meg Ryan
(1994) Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
(1995) Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1996) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(1997) Sigourney Weaver
Sigourney Weaver
(1998) Goldie Hawn
Goldie Hawn
(1999) Jamie Lee Curtis
Jamie Lee Curtis
(2000)

2001–present

Drew Barrymore
Drew Barrymore
(2001) Sarah Jessica Parker
Sarah Jessica Parker
(2002) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(2003) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
(2004) Catherine Zeta-Jones
Catherine Zeta-Jones
(2005) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2006) Scarlett Johansson
Scarlett Johansson
(2007) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2008) Renée Zellweger
Renée Zellweger
(2009) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2010) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2011) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(2012) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2013) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2014) Amy Poehler
Amy Poehler
(2015) Kerry Washington
Kerry Washington
(2016) Octavia Spencer
Octavia Spencer
(2017) Mila Kunis
Mila Kunis
(2018)

v t e

Independent Spirit Award for Best Female Lead

Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1985) Isabella Rossellini
Isabella Rossellini
(1986) Sally Kirkland
Sally Kirkland
(1987) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1988) Andie MacDowell
Andie MacDowell
(1989) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1990) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1991) Fairuza Balk
Fairuza Balk
(1992) Ashley Judd
Ashley Judd
(1993) Linda Fiorentino (1994) Elisabeth Shue
Elisabeth Shue
(1995) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(1997) Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
(2000) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Catalina Sandino Moreno
Catalina Sandino Moreno
(2004) Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
(2005) Shareeka Epps (2006) Ellen Page
Ellen Page
(2007) Melissa Leo
Melissa Leo
(2008) Gabourey Sidibe
Gabourey Sidibe
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Michelle Williams (2011) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

London Film Critics' Circle Award for Actress of the Year

Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1991) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Linda Fiorentino (1994) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(1995) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(1997) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(1998) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2001) Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
(2002) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2003) Imelda Staunton
Imelda Staunton
(2004) Naomi Watts
Naomi Watts
(2005) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Mo'Nique
Mo'Nique
(2009) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(2010) Anna Paquin
Anna Paquin
/ Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2011) Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling
(2015) Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Actress

Florinda Bolkan
Florinda Bolkan
(1975) Liv Ullmann
Liv Ullmann
(1976) Shelley Duvall
Shelley Duvall
(1977) Jane Fonda
Jane Fonda
(1978) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1979) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(1980) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1981) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1982) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1983) Kathleen Turner
Kathleen Turner
(1984) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1985) Sandrine Bonnaire
Sandrine Bonnaire
(1986) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
/ Sally Kirkland
Sally Kirkland
(1987) Christine Lahti
Christine Lahti
(1988) Andie MacDowell
Andie MacDowell
/ Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
(1989) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1990) Mercedes Ruehl
Mercedes Ruehl
(1991) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1994) Elisabeth Shue
Elisabeth Shue
(1995) Brenda Blethyn
Brenda Blethyn
(1996) Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter
(1997) Fernanda Montenegro
Fernanda Montenegro
/ Ally Sheedy
Ally Sheedy
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Naomi Watts
Naomi Watts
(2003) Imelda Staunton
Imelda Staunton
(2004) Vera Farmiga
Vera Farmiga
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2008) Yolande Moreau
Yolande Moreau
(2009) Kim Hye-ja (2010) Yoon Jeong-hee (2011) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
/ Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
/ Adèle Exarchopoulos
Adèle Exarchopoulos
(2013) Patricia Arquette
Patricia Arquette
(2014) Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling
(2015) Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2016) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2017)

v t e

Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Supporting Actress

Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1977) Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton
/ Mona Washbourne
Mona Washbourne
(1978) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1979) Mary Steenburgen
Mary Steenburgen
(1980) Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton
(1981) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(1982) Linda Hunt
Linda Hunt
(1983) Peggy Ashcroft
Peggy Ashcroft
(1984) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1985) Cathy Tyson / Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1986) Olympia Dukakis
Olympia Dukakis
(1987) Geneviève Bujold
Geneviève Bujold
(1988) Brenda Fricker
Brenda Fricker
(1989) Lorraine Bracco
Lorraine Bracco
(1990) Jane Horrocks (1991) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1992) Anna Paquin
Anna Paquin
/ Rosie Perez
Rosie Perez
(1993) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1994) Joan Allen
Joan Allen
(1995) Barbara Hershey
Barbara Hershey
(1996) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(1997) Joan Allen
Joan Allen
(1998) Chloë Sevigny
Chloë Sevigny
(1999) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2000) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2001) Edie Falco
Edie Falco
(2002) Shohreh Aghdashloo
Shohreh Aghdashloo
(2003) Virginia
Virginia
Madsen (2004) Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
(2005) Luminița Gheorghiu (2006) Amy Ryan
Amy Ryan
(2007) Penélope Cruz
Penélope Cruz
(2008) Mo'Nique
Mo'Nique
(2009) Jacki Weaver
Jacki Weaver
(2010) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2011) Amy Adams
Amy Adams
(2012) Lupita Nyong'o
Lupita Nyong'o
(2013) Agata Kulesza
Agata Kulesza
(2014) Alicia Vikander
Alicia Vikander
(2015) Lily Gladstone (2016) Laurie Metcalf
Laurie Metcalf
(2017)

v t e

National Board of Review
National Board of Review
Award for Best Actress

Joan Crawford
Joan Crawford
(1945) Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
(1946) Celia Johnson
Celia Johnson
(1947) Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland
(1948) Gloria Swanson
Gloria Swanson
(1950) Jan Sterling
Jan Sterling
(1951) Shirley Booth
Shirley Booth
(1952) Jean Simmons
Jean Simmons
(1953) Grace Kelly
Grace Kelly
(1954) Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
(1955) Dorothy McGuire
Dorothy McGuire
(1956) Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1957) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1958) Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
(1959) Greer Garson
Greer Garson
(1960) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1961) Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
(1962) Patricia Neal
Patricia Neal
(1963) Kim Stanley
Kim Stanley
(1964) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(1965) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1966) Edith Evans
Edith Evans
(1967) Liv Ullmann
Liv Ullmann
(1968) Geraldine Page
Geraldine Page
(1969) Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson
(1970) Irene Papas
Irene Papas
(1971) Cicely Tyson
Cicely Tyson
(1972) Liv Ullmann
Liv Ullmann
(1973) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1974) Isabelle Adjani
Isabelle Adjani
(1975) Liv Ullmann
Liv Ullmann
(1976) Anne Bancroft
Anne Bancroft
(1977) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1978) Sally Field
Sally Field
(1979) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(1980) Glenda Jackson
Glenda Jackson
(1981) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1982) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1983) Peggy Ashcroft
Peggy Ashcroft
(1984) Whoopi Goldberg
Whoopi Goldberg
(1985) Kathleen Turner
Kathleen Turner
(1986) Lillian Gish
Lillian Gish
/ Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1987) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1988) Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
(1989) Mia Farrow
Mia Farrow
(1990) Geena Davis
Geena Davis
/ Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1991) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1992) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1993) Miranda Richardson
Miranda Richardson
(1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Helena Bonham Carter
Helena Bonham Carter
(1997) Fernanda Montenegro
Fernanda Montenegro
(1998) Janet McTeer
Janet McTeer
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(2003) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(2004) Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(2007) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2008) Carey Mulligan
Carey Mulligan
(2009) Lesley Manville
Lesley Manville
(2010) Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
(2011) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2012) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Amy Adams
Amy Adams
(2016) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2017)

v t e

National Board of Review
National Board of Review
Award for Best Supporting Actress

Nina Foch
Nina Foch
(1954) Marjorie Rambeau
Marjorie Rambeau
(1955) Debbie Reynolds
Debbie Reynolds
(1956) Sybil Thorndike
Sybil Thorndike
(1957) Kay Walsh
Kay Walsh
(1958) Edith Evans
Edith Evans
(1959) Shirley Jones
Shirley Jones
(1960) Ruby Dee
Ruby Dee
(1961) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1962) Margaret Rutherford
Margaret Rutherford
(1963) Edith Evans
Edith Evans
(1964) Joan Blondell
Joan Blondell
(1965) Vivien Merchant (1966) Marjorie Rhodes
Marjorie Rhodes
(1967) Virginia
Virginia
Maskell (1968) Pamela Franklin
Pamela Franklin
(1969) Karen Black
Karen Black
(1970) Cloris Leachman
Cloris Leachman
(1971) Marisa Berenson
Marisa Berenson
(1972) Sylvia Sidney
Sylvia Sidney
(1973) Valerie Perrine
Valerie Perrine
(1974) Ronee Blakley
Ronee Blakley
(1975) Talia Shire
Talia Shire
(1976) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(1977) Angela Lansbury
Angela Lansbury
(1978) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1979) Eva Le Gallienne
Eva Le Gallienne
(1980) Mona Washbourne
Mona Washbourne
(1981) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(1982) Linda Hunt
Linda Hunt
(1983) Sabine Azéma
Sabine Azéma
(1984) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1985) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1986) Olympia Dukakis
Olympia Dukakis
(1987) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1988) Mary Stuart Masterson
Mary Stuart Masterson
(1989) Winona Ryder
Winona Ryder
(1990) Kate Nelligan (1991) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1992) Winona Ryder
Winona Ryder
(1993) Rosemary Harris
Rosemary Harris
(1994) Mira Sorvino
Mira Sorvino
(1995) Juliette Binoche
Juliette Binoche
/ Kristin Scott Thomas
Kristin Scott Thomas
(1996) Anne Heche
Anne Heche
(1997) Christina Ricci
Christina Ricci
(1998) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(1999) Lupe Ontiveros
Lupe Ontiveros
(2000) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2001) Kathy Bates
Kathy Bates
(2002) Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
(2003) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2004) Gong Li
Gong Li
(2005) Catherine O'Hara
Catherine O'Hara
(2006) Amy Ryan
Amy Ryan
(2007) Penélope Cruz
Penélope Cruz
(2008) Anna Kendrick
Anna Kendrick
(2009) Jacki Weaver
Jacki Weaver
(2010) Shailene Woodley
Shailene Woodley
(2011) Ann Dowd
Ann Dowd
(2012) Octavia Spencer
Octavia Spencer
(2013) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2014) Jennifer Jason Leigh
Jennifer Jason Leigh
(2015) Naomie Harris
Naomie Harris
(2016) Laurie Metcalf
Laurie Metcalf
(2017)

v t e

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Supporting Actress

Marjorie Rhodes
Marjorie Rhodes
(1967) Billie Whitelaw
Billie Whitelaw
(1968) Siân Phillips
Siân Phillips
/ Delphine Seyrig
Delphine Seyrig
(1969) Lois Smith
Lois Smith
(1970) Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
(1971) Jeannie Berlin (1972) Valentina Cortese
Valentina Cortese
(1973) Bibi Andersson
Bibi Andersson
(1974) Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
(1975) Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1976) Ann Wedgeworth (1977) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1978) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(1979) Mary Steenburgen
Mary Steenburgen
(1980) Maureen Stapleton
Maureen Stapleton
(1981) Jessica Lange
Jessica Lange
(1982) Sandra Bernhard
Sandra Bernhard
(1983) Melanie Griffith
Melanie Griffith
(1984) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1985) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1986) Kathy Baker
Kathy Baker
(1987) Mercedes Ruehl
Mercedes Ruehl
(1988) Anjelica Huston
Anjelica Huston
(1989) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(1990) Jane Horrocks (1991) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(1992) Madeleine Stowe
Madeleine Stowe
(1993) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(1994) Joan Allen
Joan Allen
(1995) Barbara Hershey
Barbara Hershey
(1996) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(1997) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(1998) Chloë Sevigny
Chloë Sevigny
(1999) Elaine May
Elaine May
(2000) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2001) Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
(2002) Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
(2003) Virginia
Virginia
Madsen (2004) Amy Adams
Amy Adams
(2005) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2006) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2007) Hanna Schygulla
Hanna Schygulla
(2008) Mo'Nique
Mo'Nique
(2009) Olivia Williams
Olivia Williams
(2010) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2011) Amy Adams
Amy Adams
(2012) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2013) Patricia Arquette
Patricia Arquette
(2014) Kristen Stewart
Kristen Stewart
(2015) Michelle Williams (2016) Laurie Metcalf
Laurie Metcalf
(2017)

v t e

San Diego Film Critics Society Award for Best Actress

1990s

Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Pam Grier
Pam Grier
/ Bai Ling
Bai Ling
(1997) Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1998) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(1999)

2000s

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
/ Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Thora Birch
Thora Birch
(2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Naomi Watts
Naomi Watts
(2003) Imelda Staunton
Imelda Staunton
(2004) Joan Allen
Joan Allen
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Michelle Monaghan
Michelle Monaghan
(2009)

2010s

Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2010) Brit Marling
Brit Marling
(2011) Michelle Williams (2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Sônia Braga
Sônia Braga
(2016) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2017)

v t e

Satellite Award for Best Actress – Motion Picture

Musical or Comedy (1996–2010, retired)

Gwyneth Paltrow
Gwyneth Paltrow
(1996) Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt
(1997) Christina Ricci
Christina Ricci
(1998) Janet McTeer
Janet McTeer
(1999) Renée Zellweger
Renée Zellweger
(2000) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2001) Jennifer Westfeldt
Jennifer Westfeldt
(2002) Diane Keaton
Diane Keaton
(2003) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(2004) Reese Witherspoon
Reese Witherspoon
(2005) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2006) Ellen Page
Ellen Page
(2007) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2008) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2009) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2010)

Motion Picture Drama (1996–2010, retired)

Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(1997) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(1998) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(1999) Ellen Burstyn
Ellen Burstyn
(2000) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(2001) Diane Lane
Diane Lane
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(2004) Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
(2008) Shohreh Aghdashloo
Shohreh Aghdashloo
(2009) Noomi Rapace
Noomi Rapace
(2010)

Motion Picture (2011–present)

Viola Davis
Viola Davis
(2011) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Saoirse Ronan
Saoirse Ronan
(2015) Isabelle Huppert‎ / Ruth Negga
Ruth Negga
(2016) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
/ Diane Kruger
Diane Kruger
(2017)

v t e

Satellite Award for Best Supporting Actress – Motion Picture

Musical or Comedy (1996–2005, retired)

Debbie Reynolds
Debbie Reynolds
(1996) Joan Cusack
Joan Cusack
(1997) Joan Allen
Joan Allen
(1998) Catherine Keener
Catherine Keener
(1999) Kate Hudson
Kate Hudson
(2000) Maggie Smith
Maggie Smith
(2001) Tovah Feldshuh
Tovah Feldshuh
(2002) Patricia Clarkson
Patricia Clarkson
(2003) Regina King
Regina King
(2004) Rosario Dawson
Rosario Dawson
(2005)

Motion Picture Drama (1996–2005, retired)

Courtney Love
Courtney Love
(1996) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(1997) Kimberly Elise
Kimberly Elise
(1998) Chloë Sevigny
Chloë Sevigny
(1999) Jennifer Ehle
Jennifer Ehle
/ Rosemary Harris
Rosemary Harris
(2000) Jennifer Connelly
Jennifer Connelly
(2001) Edie Falco
Edie Falco
(2002) Maria Bello
Maria Bello
(2003) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(2004) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2005)

Motion Picture (2006–present)

Jennifer Hudson
Jennifer Hudson
(2006) Amy Ryan
Amy Ryan
(2007) Rosemarie DeWitt
Rosemarie DeWitt
(2008) Mo'Nique
Mo'Nique
(2009) Jacki Weaver
Jacki Weaver
(2010) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2011) Anne Hathaway
Anne Hathaway
(2012) June Squibb (2013) Patricia Arquette
Patricia Arquette
(2014) Alicia Vikander
Alicia Vikander
(2015) Naomie Harris
Naomie Harris
(2016) Lois Smith
Lois Smith
(2017)

v t e

Satellite Award for Best Actress – Miniseries or Television Film

Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(1996) Jennifer Beals
Jennifer Beals
(1997) Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
(1998) Linda Hamilton
Linda Hamilton
(1999) Jill Hennessy
Jill Hennessy
(2000) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(2001) Vanessa Williams
Vanessa Williams
(2002) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2003) Dianne Wiest
Dianne Wiest
(2004) Kristen Bell
Kristen Bell
(2005) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(2006) Samantha Morton
Samantha Morton
(2007) Judi Dench
Judi Dench
(2008) Drew Barrymore
Drew Barrymore
(2009) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(2010) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2011) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2012) Elisabeth Moss
Elisabeth Moss
(2013) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2014) Sarah Hay (2015) Sarah Paulson
Sarah Paulson
(2016) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2017)

v t e

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

Jodie Foster
Jodie Foster
(1994) Susan Sarandon
Susan Sarandon
(1995) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(1996) Helen Hunt
Helen Hunt
(1997) Gwyneth Paltrow
Gwyneth Paltrow
(1998) Annette Bening
Annette Bening
(1999) Julia Roberts
Julia Roberts
(2000) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2001) Renée Zellweger
Renée Zellweger
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Hilary Swank
Hilary Swank
(2004) Reese Witherspoon
Reese Witherspoon
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Julie Christie
Julie Christie
(2007) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2008) Sandra Bullock
Sandra Bullock
(2009) Natalie Portman
Natalie Portman
(2010) Viola Davis
Viola Davis
(2011) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Emma Stone
Emma Stone
(2016) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2017)

v t e

Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Miniseries or Television Movie

Joanne Woodward
Joanne Woodward
(1994) Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
(1995) Kathy Bates
Kathy Bates
(1996) Alfre Woodard
Alfre Woodard
(1997) Angelina Jolie
Angelina Jolie
(1998) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(1999) Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(2000) Judy Davis
Judy Davis
(2001) Stockard Channing
Stockard Channing
(2002) Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2003) Glenn Close
Glenn Close
(2004) S. Epatha Merkerson
S. Epatha Merkerson
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Queen Latifah
Queen Latifah
(2007) Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2008) Drew Barrymore
Drew Barrymore
(2009) Claire Danes
Claire Danes
(2010) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2011) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2012) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2013) Frances McDormand
Frances McDormand
(2014) Queen Latifah
Queen Latifah
(2015) Sarah Paulson
Sarah Paulson
(2016) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
(2017)

v t e

Silver Bear for Best Actress

Elsa Martinelli
Elsa Martinelli
(1956) Yvonne Mitchell
Yvonne Mitchell
(1957) Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
(1958) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1959) Juliette Mayniel (1960) Anna Karina
Anna Karina
(1961) Rita Gam
Rita Gam
/ Viveca Lindfors
Viveca Lindfors
(1962) Bibi Andersson
Bibi Andersson
(1963) Sachiko Hidari
Sachiko Hidari
(1964) Madhur Jaffrey
Madhur Jaffrey
(1965) Lola Albright
Lola Albright
(1966) Edith Evans
Edith Evans
(1967) Stéphane Audran (1968) Simone Signoret
Simone Signoret
/ Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1971) Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth Taylor
(1972) Kinuyo Tanaka (1975) Jadwiga Barańska
Jadwiga Barańska
(1976) Lily Tomlin
Lily Tomlin
(1977) Gena Rowlands
Gena Rowlands
(1978) Hanna Schygulla
Hanna Schygulla
(1979) Renate Krößner (1980) Barbara Grabowska (1981) Katrin Sass
Katrin Sass
(1982) Yevgeniya Glushenko (1983) Inna Churikova
Inna Churikova
(1984) Jo Kennedy (1985) Charlotte Valandrey
Charlotte Valandrey
/ Marcélia Cartaxo (1986) Ana Beatriz Nogueira (1987) Holly Hunter
Holly Hunter
(1988) Isabelle Adjani
Isabelle Adjani
(1989) Victoria Abril
Victoria Abril
(1991) Maggie Cheung
Maggie Cheung
(1992) Michelle Pfeiffer
Michelle Pfeiffer
(1993) Crissy Rock (1994) Josephine Siao (1995) Anouk Grinberg
Anouk Grinberg
(1996) Juliette Binoche
Juliette Binoche
(1997) Fernanda Montenegro
Fernanda Montenegro
(1998) Juliane Köhler
Juliane Köhler
(1999) Bibiana Beglau
Bibiana Beglau
(2000) Kerry Fox
Kerry Fox
(2001) Halle Berry
Halle Berry
(2002) Nicole Kidman
Nicole Kidman
/ Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
/ Meryl Streep
Meryl Streep
(2003) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
/ Catalina Sandino Moreno
Catalina Sandino Moreno
(2004) Julia Jentsch
Julia Jentsch
(2005) Sandra Hüller
Sandra Hüller
(2006) Nina Hoss
Nina Hoss
(2007) Sally Hawkins
Sally Hawkins
(2008) Birgit Minichmayr
Birgit Minichmayr
(2009) Shinobu Terajima
Shinobu Terajima
(2010) Sareh Bayat
Sareh Bayat
/ Sarina Farhadi / Leila Hatami
Leila Hatami
/ Kimia Hosseini (2011) Rachel Mwanza
Rachel Mwanza
(2012) Paulina García
Paulina García
(2013) Haru Kuroki
Haru Kuroki
(2014) Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling
(2015) Trine Dyrholm
Trine Dyrholm
(2016) Kim Min-hee (2017)

v t e

Vancouver Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actress

Laura Linney
Laura Linney
(2000) Sissy Spacek
Sissy Spacek
(2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Charlize Theron
Charlize Theron
(2003) Imelda Staunton
Imelda Staunton
(2004) Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard
(2007) Kate Winslet
Kate Winslet
(2008) Carey Mulligan
Carey Mulligan
(2009) Jennifer Lawrence
Jennifer Lawrence
(2010) Elizabeth Olsen
Elizabeth Olsen
(2011) Jessica Chastain
Jessica Chastain
(2012) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2013) Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
(2014) Brie Larson
Brie Larson
(2015) Isabelle Huppert
Isabelle Huppert
(2016)

v t e

Volpi Cup
Volpi Cup
for Best Actress

1934–1968

Katharine Hepburn
Katharine Hepburn
(1934) Paula Wessely
Paula Wessely
(1935) Annabella (1936) Bette Davis
Bette Davis
(1937) Norma Shearer
Norma Shearer
(1938) Luise Ullrich
Luise Ullrich
(1941) Kristina Söderbaum
Kristina Söderbaum
(1942) Anna Magnani
Anna Magnani
(1947) Jean Simmons
Jean Simmons
(1948) Olivia de Havilland
Olivia de Havilland
(1949) Eleanor Parker
Eleanor Parker
(1950) Vivien Leigh
Vivien Leigh
(1951) Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1952) Lilli Palmer
Lilli Palmer
(1953) Maria Schell
Maria Schell
(1956) Dzidra Ritenberga (1957) Sophia Loren
Sophia Loren
(1958) Madeleine Robinson (1959) Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1960) Suzanne Flon
Suzanne Flon
(1961) Emmanuelle Riva
Emmanuelle Riva
(1962) Delphine Seyrig
Delphine Seyrig
(1963) Harriet Andersson
Harriet Andersson
(1964) Annie Girardot
Annie Girardot
(1965) Natalya Arinbasarova
Natalya Arinbasarova
(1966) Shirley Knight
Shirley Knight
(1967) Laura Betti
Laura Betti
(1968)

1983–present

Darling Légitimus
Darling Légitimus
(1983) Pascale Ogier
Pascale Ogier
(1984) Valeria Golino
Valeria Golino
(1986) Kang Soo-yeon (1987) Isabelle Huppert/ Shirley MacLaine
Shirley MacLaine
(1988) Peggy Ashcroft/ Geraldine James (1989) Gloria Münchmeyer
Gloria Münchmeyer
(1990) Tilda Swinton
Tilda Swinton
(1991) Gong Li
Gong Li
(1992) Juliette Binoche/ Anna Bonaiuto
Anna Bonaiuto
(1993) Maria de Medeiros/ Vanessa Redgrave
Vanessa Redgrave
(1994) Sandrine Bonnaire/Isabelle Huppert/ Isabella Ferrari
Isabella Ferrari
(1995) Victoire Thivisol (1996) Robin Tunney
Robin Tunney
(1997) Catherine Deneuve
Catherine Deneuve
(1998) Nathalie Baye
Nathalie Baye
(1999) Rose Byrne
Rose Byrne
(2000) Sandra Ceccarelli (2001) Julianne Moore
Julianne Moore
(2002) Katja Riemann
Katja Riemann
(2003) Imelda Staunton
Imelda Staunton
(2004) Giovanna Mezzogiorno
Giovanna Mezzogiorno
(2005) Helen Mirren
Helen Mirren
(2006) Cate Blanchett
Cate Blanchett
(2007) Dominique Blanc
Dominique Blanc
(2008) Kseniya Rappoport
Kseniya Rappoport
(2009) Ariane Labed
Ariane Labed
(2010) Deanie Ip (2011) Hadas Yaron
Hadas Yaron
(2012) Elena Cotta
Elena Cotta
(2013) Alba Rohrwacher
Alba Rohrwacher
(2014) Valeria Golino
Valeria Golino
(2015) Emma Stone
Emma Stone
(2016) Charlotte Rampling
Charlotte Rampling
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 117361625 LCCN: no97011133 ISNI: 0000 0001 0938 9014 GND: 133541495 SUDOC: 059205857 BNF: cb14027878z (data) BIBSYS: 99020849 BNE: XX1271

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