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The Info List - John Volpe


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John Anthony Volpe (/ˈvoʊlpi/; December 8, 1908 – November 11, 1994) was an American diplomat, politician and member of the Republican Party who served as the 61st and 63rd Governor of Massachusetts
Massachusetts
from 1961 to 1963 and 1965 to 1969, as the United States Secretary of Transportation from 1969 to 1973 and as the United States Ambassador to Italy
Italy
from 1973 to 1977.[1]

Contents

1 Early life and education 2 Early career 3 Governor of Massachusetts 4 Presidential campaign 5 Secretary of Transportation 6 Ambassador to Italy 7 Death and legacy 8 References

Early life and education[edit] Volpe was born on December 8, 1908 in Wakefield, Massachusetts.[2] He was the son of Italian immigrants Vito and Filomena (Benedetto), who had come from Abruzzo
Abruzzo
to Boston's North End on the SS Canopic
SS Canopic
in 1905; his father was in the construction business. Volpe attended the Wentworth Institute (later known as the Wentworth Institute of Technology) in Boston where he majored in architectural construction and entered the construction business, building his own firm in 1930.[3] On June 18, 1934, Volpe married the former Giovaninna Benedetto, known as Jennie, with whom he had two children, John Anthony, Jr. and Loretta Jean Volpe Rotondi. During World War II, he volunteered to serve stateside as a United States Navy Seabees training officer. Early career[edit] In 1953, he was appointed as the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Commissioner of Public Works, and in 1956 he was appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as the first administrator of the Federal Highway Administration. Governor of Massachusetts[edit] In 1960, Volpe was elected Governor of Massachusetts, defeating Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Secretary of the Commonwealth Joseph D. Ward. He served as governor from 1961 to 1963. In 1962, Volpe was narrowly defeated for reelection, losing to former Governor's Councillor Endicott Peabody. Peabody had been a close friend of then President John F. Kennedy. In 1964, Volpe ran again for governor and was able to capitalize on fratricide within the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Democratic Party when then Lieutenant Governor Francis X. Bellotti defeated Peabody for the Democratic nomination for governor. Despite the Democratic landslide nationwide that year, Volpe defeated Bellotti in a close race. In 1966, Volpe was elected to the first four-year term in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
history, defeating former Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Attorney General Edward J. McCormack, Jr. During his administration, Governor Volpe signed legislation to ban racial imbalances in education, reorganize the state's Board of Education, liberalize birth control laws, and increase public housing for low-income families. Governor Volpe also raised revenues by his long, and ultimately successful, fight to institute a three percent state sales tax. He served as president of the National Governors Association from 1967 to 1968. Presidential campaign[edit] In 1968, Governor Volpe ran unsuccessfully as a "Favorite son" candidate for the Republican presidential nomination. He was defeated in the state presidential primary by a spontaneous write-in campaign for New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller. It was widely believed that he was hoping to be chosen as his party's candidate for Vice President. Secretary of Transportation[edit] Following the election of President Richard M. Nixon, Volpe was named Secretary of Transportation. He resigned as governor to assume the cabinet post, and served in that position from 1969 to 1973. During his tenure as Secretary of Transportation, Amtrak
Amtrak
was created. Volpe was the second to serve in this role following the position becoming a Cabinet-level appointment. He received the Award of Excellence in 1970 from Engineering News-Record
Engineering News-Record
for his service as Secretary of Transportation.[4] Ambassador to Italy[edit] In 1973, Volpe was nominated by President Nixon and confirmed by the United States
United States
Senate as United States
United States
Ambassador to Italy, a position he held until 1977. Death and legacy[edit] Volpe died in Nahant, Massachusetts
Nahant, Massachusetts
on November 11, 1994, at the age of 85.[1] He was buried at Forest Glade Cemetery in Wakefield, Massachusetts.[5] The John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center
in Cambridge was named in his memory, as well as the Governor John A. Volpe Library at Wakefield High School in Wakefield. The papers of John A. Volpe are in the Archives and Special
Special
Collections of the Northeastern University Libraries, in Boston.[6] Terminal E at Logan International Airport
Logan International Airport
is also dedicated in his honor. References[edit]

^ a b Jennifer Steinhauer (November 13, 1994). "John A. Volpe, Nixon Supporter And Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Governor, 85". New York Times. Retrieved 2014-11-11. John Anthony Volpe, a former Governor of Massachusetts, Ambassador to Italy
Italy
and United States
United States
Secretary of Transportation, died on Friday night. He was 85 and lived in Nahunt, Mass. The Nahant police attributed his death to natural causes. ...  ^ "John Volpe, The Life of An Immigrant's Son", Kathleen Kilgore, Yankee Books, 1987, pages 19-20 ^ "Biography: John A. Volpe" Archived 2012-11-22 at the Wayback Machine., US Department of Transportation ^ Lewis, Scott (April 20, 2015), "ENR Marks 50 Years of Excellence", Engineering News-Record, New York: Dodge Data & Analytics, vol. 274 no. 11, pp. 42–56, ISSN 0891-9526  ^ John Anthony Volpe at Find a Grave ^ John A. Volpe Papers - Northeastern University
Northeastern University
Library

Party political offices

Preceded by Charles Gibbons Republican nominee for Governor of Massachusetts 1960, 1962, 1964, 1966 Succeeded by Francis W. Sargent

Political offices

Preceded by Foster Furcolo Governor of Massachusetts 1961–1963 Succeeded by Endicott Peabody

Preceded by Endicott Peabody Governor of Massachusetts 1965–1969 Succeeded by Francis W. Sargent

Preceded by William L. Guy Chair of the National Governors Association 1967–1968 Succeeded by Buford Ellington

Preceded by Alan Boyd United States
United States
Secretary of Transportation 1969–1973 Succeeded by Claude Brinegar

Diplomatic posts

Preceded by Graham Martin United States
United States
Ambassador to Italy 1973–1977 Succeeded by Richard N. Gardner

v t e

United States
United States
Secretaries of Transportation

Boyd Volpe Brinegar Coleman Adams Goldschmidt Lewis Dole Burnley Skinner Card Peña Slater Mineta Peters LaHood Foxx Chao

v t e

Governors of Massachusetts

Colony (1629–86)

Endecott Winthrop T. Dudley Haynes Vane Winthrop T. Dudley Bellingham Winthrop Endecott T. Dudley Winthrop Endecott T. Dudley Endecott Bellingham Endecott Bellingham Leverett Bradstreet

Dominion (1686–89)

J. Dudley Andros Bradstreet

Province (1692–1776)

W. Phips Stoughton Bellomont Stoughton Governor's Council J. Dudley Governor's Council J. Dudley Tailer Shute Dummer Burnet Dummer Tailer Belcher Shirley S. Phips Shirley S. Phips Governor's Council Pownall Hutchinson Bernard Hutchinson Gage

Commonwealth (since 1776)

Hancock Cushing Bowdoin Hancock Adams Sumner Gill Governor's Council Strong Sullivan Lincoln Sr. Gore Gerry Strong Brooks Eustis Morton Lincoln Jr. Davis Armstrong Everett Morton Davis Morton Briggs Boutwell Clifford E. Washburn Gardner Banks Andrew Bullock Claflin W. Washburn Talbot Gaston Rice Talbot Long Butler Robinson Ames Brackett Russell Greenhalge Wolcott Crane Bates Douglas Guild Draper Foss Walsh McCall Coolidge Cox Fuller Allen Ely Curley Hurley Saltonstall Tobin Bradford Dever Herter Furcolo Volpe Peabody Volpe Sargent Dukakis King Dukakis Weld Cellucci Swift Romney Patrick Baker

Italics indicate acting officeholders

v t e

Chairs of the National Governors Association

Willson McGovern Walsh Spry Capper Harrington Allen Sproul Cox Trinkle Brewster McMullen Dern Case Pollard Rolph McNutt Peery Cochran Stark Vanderbilt Stassen O'Conor Saltonstall Maw Martin Caldwell Hildreth Hunt Lane Carlson Lausche Peterson Shivers Thornton Kennon Langlie Stanley Stratton Collins Boggs McNichols Powell Rosellini Anderson Sawyer Reed Guy Volpe Ellington Love Hearnes Moore Mandel Evans Rampton Ray Andrus Askew Milliken Carroll Bowen Busbee Snelling Matheson J. Thompson Carlin Alexander Clinton Sununu Baliles Branstad Gardner Ashcroft Romer Campbell Dean T. Thompson Miller Voinovich Carper Leavitt Glendening Engler Patton Kempthorne Warner Huckabee Napolitano Pawlenty Rendell Douglas Manchin Gregoire Heineman Markell Fallin Hickenlooper Herbert McAuliffe Sandoval

v t e

United States
United States
Ambassadors to Italy
Italy

Kingdom of the Two Sicilies

Chargé d'affaires

Nelson Throop Boulware Polk Rowan Morris

Minister Resident

Owen Chandler

Kingdom of Sardinia

Chargé d'affaires

Rogers Baber Wickliffe Niles Kinney Daniel

Minister Resident

Daniel

Kingdom of Italy

Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary

Marsh Astor Stallo Porter Potter

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary

MacVeagh Draper Meyer White Griscom Leishman O'Brien Page Johnson Child Fletcher Garrett Long W. Phillips Wadsworth (chargé d'affaires) Kirk

Italian Republic

Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary

Dunn Bunker Luce Zellerbach Reinhardt Ackley Martin Volpe Gardner Rabb Secchia Bartholomew Foglietta Sembler Spogli Thorne J. Phillips Eisenberg

v t e

Cabinet of President Richard Nixon
Richard Nixon
(1969–74)

Vice President

Spiro T. Agnew (1969–73) None (1973) Gerald R. Ford (1973–74)

Secretary of State

William P. Rogers
William P. Rogers
(1969–73) Henry A. Kissinger (1973–74)

Secretary of the Treasury

David M. Kennedy
David M. Kennedy
(1969–71) John B. Connally (1971–72) George P. Shultz
George P. Shultz
(1972–74) William E. Simon
William E. Simon
(1974)

Secretary of Defense

Melvin R. Laird (1969–73) Elliot L. Richardson (1973) James R. Schlesinger
James R. Schlesinger
(1973–74)

Attorney General

John N. Mitchell
John N. Mitchell
(1969–72) Richard G. Kleindienst (1972–73) Elliot L. Richardson (1973) William B. Saxbe
William B. Saxbe
(1974)

Postmaster General

Winton M. Blount
Winton M. Blount
(1969–71)

Secretary of the Interior

Walter J. Hickel (1969–70) Rogers C. B. Morton (1970–74)

Secretary of Agriculture

Clifford M. Hardin
Clifford M. Hardin
(1969–71) Earl L. Butz (1971–74)

Secretary of Commerce

Maurice H. Stans (1969–72) Peter G. Peterson (1972–73) Frederick B. Dent
Frederick B. Dent
(1973–74)

Secretary of Labor

George P. Shultz
George P. Shultz
(1969–70) James D. Hodgson (1970–73) Peter J. Brennan
Peter J. Brennan
(1973–74)

Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare

Robert H. Finch (1969–70) Elliot L. Richardson (1970–73) Caspar W. Weinberger (1973–74)

Secretary of Housing and Urban Development

George W. Romney
George W. Romney
(1969–73) James T. Lynn (1973–74)

Secretary of Transportation

John Volpe
John Volpe
(1969–73) Claude S. Brinegar (1973–74)

v t e

(1964 ←)    United States
United States
presidential election, 1968    (→ 1972)

United States
United States
elections, 1968

Republican Party

Convention Primaries

Nominee

Richard Nixon

campaign

VP nominee

Spiro Agnew

Candidates

Frank Carlson Clifford P. Case Hiram Fong John Lindsay Ronald Reagan Jim Rhodes Nelson Rockefeller Winthrop Rockefeller George W. Romney

campaign

Harold Stassen John Volpe

Democratic Party

Convention Primaries

Protests

Nominee

Hubert Humphrey

campaign

VP nominee

Edmund Muskie

Candidates

Roger D. Branigin John G. Crommelin Paul C. Fisher Lyndon B. Johnson Robert F. Kennedy
Robert F. Kennedy
(campaign) Thomas C. Lynch Eugene McCarthy (campaign) George McGovern Dan K. Moore Channing E. Phillips George Smathers Stephen M. Young

American Independent Party

Nominee

George Wallace

campaign

VP nominee

Curtis LeMay

Other third party and independent candidates

Communist Party

Nominee

Charlene Mitchell

VP nominee

Michael Zagarell

Peace and Freedom Party

Nominee

Eldridge Cleaver

VP nominee

Douglas Fitzgerald Dowd

Prohibition Party

Nominee

E. Harold Munn

Socialist Labor Party

Nominee

Henning A. Blomen

Socialist Workers Party

Nominee

Fred Halstead

VP nominee

Paul Boutelle

Independents and other candidates

Dick Gregory Pat Paulsen Pigasus

Other 1968 elections: House Senate Gubernatorial

v t e

Engineering News-Record
Engineering News-Record
Award of Excellence

1966–1980

Lyman Dwight Wilbur (1966) Vinton W. Bacon (1967) Edgar Kaiser, Sr (1968) Ezra Ehrenkrantz (1969) John Volpe
John Volpe
(1970) Ray Monti (1971) Fazlur Rahman Khan
Fazlur Rahman Khan
(1972) J. Leon Altemose (1973) Stephen Bechtel Jr. (1974) Saul Horowitz Jr. (1975) Frank Moolin Jr.
Frank Moolin Jr.
(1976) John W. Morris
John W. Morris
(1977) Wallace L. Chawick (1978) H. Edgar Lore (1979) J. Robert Fluor (1980)

1981–2000

Robert A. Boyd (1981) Thomas D. Larson (1982) Charles D. Brown (1983) William B. Derrickson (1984) James Rouse (1985) Marwan M. Sadat (1986) John W. Fisher (1987) James W. Poirot (1988) Leslie E. Robertson (1989) Vitelmo Bertero (1990) Jack Lemley (1991) Terry Farley (1992) Leo P. Duffy (1993) Ginger S. Evans (1994) Michael Virlogeux (1995) Sherry Plaster Carter (1996) Robert A. Tinstman (1997) Dennis G. Majors (1998) John G. Voeller (1999) Robert M. Thompson (2000)

2001–present

Charles H. Thornton (2001) Michael Burton (2002) Kathi Littmann (2003) Gregg Martin (2004) Joe Maloney (2005) Dwayne McAninch (2006) Lewis E. Link Jr. (2007) Clyde N. Baker Jr. (2008) Bernard Amadei (2009) John Hillman (2010) Jeffrey Baker (2011) Theodore Zoli (2012) Wayne E. Jones (2013) Stephen Selkowitz
Stephen Selkowitz
(2014) HT Tran (2015) Jason F. McLennan (2016) Marc Edwards (2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 70402829 LCCN: n86007

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