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John Houston Stockton (born March 26, 1962) is an American retired professional basketball player. He spent his entire professional playing career as a point guard for the Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
of the National Basketball
Basketball
Association (NBA), from 1984 to 2003. Stockton is regarded as one of the best point guards of all time,[1] holding the NBA records for most career assists and steals by considerable margins.[2][3] He is a ten-time NBA All-Star, and a two-time Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame inductee (in 2009 for his individual career, and in 2010 as a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team "Dream Team").[4] Stockton was previously an assistant coach for the Montana State University
Montana State University
women's basketball team. [5]

Contents

1 Early years 2 College career 3 NBA draft 4 NBA career 5 Player profile 6 Personal life

6.1 Post-retirement

7 NBA career statistics

7.1 Regular season 7.2 Playoffs

8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Early years[edit] Stockton was born in Spokane, Washington, to Clementine Frei and Jack Stockton, Stockton's ancestry is Irish and Swiss German.[6][7] He attended grade school at St. Aloysius and moved on to high school at Gonzaga Prep and graduated in 1980, after breaking the city record for points scored in a single basketball season.[8][9] College career[edit] After considering offers from Don Monson at Idaho and Mike Montgomery at Montana, both in the Big Sky Conference, Stockton decided to stay in Spokane and play college basketball for Dan Fitzgerald at Gonzaga University.[10] He became the third generation in his family at GU; grandfather Houston Stockton was a well-known football player for the Bulldogs in the 1920s.[10] Fitzgerald was also the athletic director; he stepped away from coaching for four years after Stockton's freshman year and promoted assistant Jay Hillock to head coach.[11] During his senior year for the Bulldogs in 1984, Stockton averaged 20.9 points per game, shooting 57% from the field. The Zags posted a 17–11 record, their best in 17 years, and Stockton led the West Coast Athletic Conference in scoring, assists, and steals.[12] He was one of 74 college seniors invited to the spring tryouts for the 1984 U.S. Olympic team, coached by Bob Knight.[13][14] Stockton made the initial cut in April to the final twenty, but was one of four released in May (with Charles Barkley, Terry Porter, and Maurice Martin) in the penultimate cut to 16 players.[15] Though not selected, the experience led him to meet his future teammate and friend, Karl Malone.[16] NBA draft[edit] In June, Stockton was selected by the Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
in the first round of the 1984 NBA draft
NBA draft
with the 16th overall pick.[17] A relative unknown during his college career, his stock rose significantly in the months before the draft.[18] The announcement of his selection to the thousands of Jazz fans gathered at the Salt Palace on draft day was met with a stunned silence.[17] NBA career[edit]

John Stockton
John Stockton
spent his entire NBA career with the Utah Jazz, from 1984 to 2003.

Stockton averaged a career double-double, with 13.1 points and 10.5 assists per game. He holds the NBA's record for most career assists (15,806) by a margin of more than 3,000, as well as the record for most career steals (3,265). He had five of the top six assists seasons in NBA history (the other belonging to Isiah Thomas). He held the NBA record for the most games and consecutive games played with one team, and is third in total games played, behind Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
and Robert Parish. He had previously held the record for most seasons played with one team until the 2015–16 NBA season, when that record was broken by Kobe Bryant. He missed only 22 games during his career, 18 of them in one season. He played in 38 games where he tallied 20 or more assists. On February 1, 1995, Stockton broke Magic Johnson's record of 9,921 career assists in a game in Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
against the Denver Nuggets with 6:22 left in the first half with a bounce pass to Karl Malone, ending up with 9,927 in a 129-98 win; it was his 860th game, vs. 874 for Johnson.

A 10-time All-Star, Stockton led the NBA in assists nine times and steals twice.

Stockton appeared in 10 All-Star games, and was named co- MVP of the game in 1993 with Jazz teammate Karl Malone, which was held in Salt Lake City. He played with the 1992 and 1996 US Olympic basketball teams,[19] the first Olympic squads to feature NBA players, keeping the game ball from both gold medal games. He was selected to the All-NBA First Team
All-NBA First Team
twice, the All-NBA Second Team
All-NBA Second Team
six times, the All-NBA Third Team three times, and the NBA All-Defensive Second Team five times. He was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA history in 1996. Stockton's career highlight came in Game 6 of the 1997 Western Conference Finals. Stockton scored the last 9 points for the Jazz, including a buzzer-beating 3-point shot over the Houston Rockets' Charles Barkley, to send the Jazz to the first of its two consecutive NBA Finals
NBA Finals
appearances. In both of these appearances, Stockton's Jazz team was defeated by the Chicago Bulls. In Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals, Stockton made a three-pointer with 41.9 seconds left to give the Jazz an 86–83 lead, but Bulls guard Michael Jordan made two field goals to put his team ahead 87–86, the second one after stealing from Jazz forward Karl Malone. Stockton missed a three-point attempt with 5.2 seconds left and said in a post-game interview that he felt confident that the shot would go in.[20] For many years, he and Malone were the Jazz's one-two punch. The two played a record 1,412 regular-season games together as teammates (by comparison, only four other NBA players besides Stockton and Malone have reached 1,412 NBA games played). Many of Stockton's assists resulted from passes to Malone. Stockton earned the "old school" tag for his physical play; surveys of athletes and fans alike often judged him among the toughest players in the NBA, usually just behind teammate Karl Malone. His patented "short shorts" became known as "Stocktons"—since he continued to wear the style long after the rest of the league had adopted a baggier look. On May 2, 2003, Stockton announced his retirement with a released statement instead of the customary news conference. The Jazz later held a retirement ceremony for him, in which Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
renamed the street in front of the venue then known as Delta Center
Delta Center
(now Vivint Smart Home Arena), where the Jazz play, John Stockton Drive.[21] Stockton would later declare that despite being still content with the game and how well he was playing, his growing family made him feel that "sitting in the hotel room waiting for games wasn't making up for what I was missing at home".[16] His number 12 jersey was retired by the Jazz during a game on November 22, 2004. A statue of Stockton can be seen in front of the Vivint Smart Home Arena; an accompanying statue of Karl Malone
Karl Malone
was placed nearby on March 23, 2006. The Malone and Stockton statues stand on a bronze plaque commemorating their achievements together. Stockton was announced as a member of the 2009 class of inductees to the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame on April 6, 2009; he was formally inducted on September 11. Stockton chose 2000 inductee and fellow point guard Isiah Thomas
Isiah Thomas
to present him at the induction ceremony.[22] Stockton has also been inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame along with the rest of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team in 2010. Along with his teammate Karl Malone, Stockton is considered one of the best players who never won an NBA championship.[23] Player profile[edit] Stockton, a 10-time NBA All-Star, holds a commanding lead for the NBA record for career assists with 15,806 (10.5 per game). Stockton also holds the record for assists-per-game average over one season (14.5 in 1990) and is one of three players who have logged more than 1,000 assists in one season, joining Kevin Porter (1,099 in 1979) and Isiah Thomas (1,123 in 1985) in the exclusive list. Stockton did this seven times, with season totals of 1,164, 1,134, 1,128, 1,126, 1,118, 1,031 and 1,011 assists.[24] He and Karl Malone
Karl Malone
are regarded by many as the quintessential pick and roll duo. Apart from his passing skill, Stockton was also a capable scorer (13.1 points per game career average and a 51.5 career shooting percentage) with a reliable three-point shot (38.4% lifetime average). He is 41st on the all-time NBA scoring list with 19,711 career points.[25] Despite the fact that he had never pulled down more than 9 rebounds (or recorded more than 9 steals) during a regular season game, he finally recorded his first career triple double, at age 39, in a playoff game against the Dallas Mavericks
Dallas Mavericks
on April 28, 2001. He scored 12 points, pulled down 11 rebounds and had 10 assists.[26] On defense, Stockton holds the NBA record for career steals with 3,265. In second place is Jason Kidd, with 2,684.[27] Stockton was known for his unassuming, no-nonsense approach to the game, hard-nosed defense, and fanatical work-ethic in preparation, which resulted in his extreme durability. He played 1,504 of 1,526 possible games in his 19-season career. In his first 13 seasons, he missed only four games (all in the 1989–90 season) until he missed the first 18 games of the 1997–98 season due to an injured MCL in his left knee sustained in the preseason. That was the only major injury in his career, and he never missed another game after returning from that injury. Stockton's tenacity also earned him a reputation among some in the league as being a dirty player, as evidenced by a poll Sports Illustrated conducted in 1997 where he was voted as the second dirtiest player in the league behind Dennis Rodman.[28] Stockton's career also notable for its consistency and longevity. He maintained a high level of play to the very end of his career, and remained a starting NBA player until age 41. Stockton's Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
made the NBA playoffs in 18 of his 19 seasons in the league. During the 2000–01 NBA season, when he was 38, Stockton led the league in the "advanced stats" of true shooting percentage (a measure of points per shot attempt that factors in three pointers and free throws), offensive rating (a measure of points per 100 possessions a player's team scores while he is on the floor), and assist percentage (which measures the percentage of teammates' field goals a player assists while on the floor). Stockton led the league in assist percentage 15 times, including his last season (2002–03).[29] Stockton has a 3.56:1 assist to turnover ratio (1839 assists to 517 turnovers) in his playoff career. This is the highest playoff assist to turnover ratio of any player with a career average of 8.5 or more assists per game. Stockton avoided most endorsements, and stayed loyal to Utah despite being offered more money by other teams. In 1996, he agreed to a deal that made salary-cap space available so the team could improve, but in exchange, he insisted on guaranteed Delta Center
Delta Center
ice time for his son's hockey team.[30] On May 11, 2006, ESPN.com named Stockton the 4th best point guard of all time.[31] In 1,504 NBA games (the all-time record for a player who played for only one team and games with a single team), of which Stockton started 1,300 (third all-time since starts became an official statistic beginning with the 1981–82 season), Stockton averaged a double-double in points and assists along with 2.2 steals and 31:45 of floor time per game, and he holds other scoring accuracy records as noted above. As of December 2017, Stockton held third place on the list of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career games played leaders. He missed only 22 games during his entire career, yielding the highest percentage of attended games of all players with more than 1000 games per career (98.6 percent). Personal life[edit] Hust Stockton, Stockton's grandfather (also named John Houston Stockton) played professional football for the nascent National Football League, for the Frankford Yellow Jackets
Frankford Yellow Jackets
in the 1920s, including the Yellow Jackets' 1926 NFL Championship team.[32][33] Stockton and his wife, the former Nada Stepovich (of Serbian ancestry and the daughter of Matilda and Mike Stepovich, the last territorial governor of Alaska), reside in Spokane, Washington, and have two daughters, Lindsay and Laura, and four sons, Houston, Michael, David and Samuel. Houston Stockton played college football as a defensive back for the University of Montana
University of Montana
Grizzlies.[34][35] In 2011, Michael Stockton, who played basketball at Salt Lake City's Westminster College,[34][36] signed with BG Karlsruhe
BG Karlsruhe
in Germany's second basketball division.[37] In 2017, Michael signed with BG Göttingen
BG Göttingen
in Germany's first basketball division, the Basketball
Basketball
Bundesliga.[38] David Stockton
David Stockton
completed his college basketball career at Gonzaga in 2014 and after playing for the Reno Bighorns
Reno Bighorns
in the NBA's Development League played for the NBA's Sacramento Kings
Sacramento Kings
and is currently playing for the Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
as well.[39] David's first NBA game was with Sacramento against the Los Angeles Clippers on February 21, 2015. Daughter Lindsay Stockton graduated from Montana State University
Montana State University
and daughter Laura Stockton currently plays at Gonzaga University. Stockton has a brother and three nephews who have played college basketball. Steve Stockton, his brother, played for the University of Washington Huskies;[34] his oldest son, Steve Stockton, Jr., formerly played at Whitworth College;[34] and another son, Shawn Stockton, finished his college basketball career at Montana in the 2011–12 season.[34][40] Steve's youngest son, Riley, played for Seattle Pacific.[41] Stockton and his family are devout Roman Catholics. Post-retirement[edit] Following his retirement, Stockton started coaching in youth teams, being "an assistant on seven or eight teams at once" in 2003.[16] The Jazz also invited Stockton to train both Deron Williams
Deron Williams
and Trey Burke.[42] Stockton also became involved in various businesses.[16] In 2013, Stockton released his autobiography Assisted, written with the assistance of his junior high school coach Kerry L. Pickett. Karl Malone wrote the foreword.[43] Stockton was on the Jazz's long list of coaching candidates to replace Tyrone Corbin, before the selection of Quin Snyder.[44] On October 27, 2015, Stockton joined Montana State University's women's basketball program as an assistant coach to replace Kellee Barney.[5] Barney left the program to pursue a career in business, and Stockton had previously coached four of the players on the MSU women's team during Amateur Athletic Union
Amateur Athletic Union
leagues.[5] NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw
Free throw
percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

* Led the league

NBA record

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1984–85 Utah 82 5 18.2 .471 .182 .736 1.3 5.1 1.3 0.1 5.6

1985–86 Utah 82 38 23.6 .489 .133 .839 2.2 7.4 1.9 0.1 7.7

1986–87 Utah 82 2 22.7 .499 .179 .782 1.8 8.2 2.2 0.2 7.9

1987–88 Utah 82 79 34.7 .574 .358 .840 2.9 13.8* 3.0 0.2 14.7

1988–89 Utah 82 82 38.7 .538 .242 .863 3.0 13.6* 3.2* 0.2 17.1

1989–90 Utah 78 78 37.4 .514 .416 .819 2.6 14.5 2.7 0.2 17.2

1990–91 Utah 82 82 37.8 .507 .345 .836 2.9 14.2* 2.9 0.2 17.2

1991–92 Utah 82 82 36.6 .482 .407 .842 3.3 13.7* 3.0* 0.3 15.8

1992–93 Utah 82 82 34.9 .486 .385 .798 2.9 12.0* 2.4 0.3 15.1

1993–94 Utah 82 82 36.2 .528 .322 .805 3.1 12.6* 2.4 0.3 15.1

1994–95 Utah 82 82 35.0 .542 .449 .804 3.1 12.3* 2.4 0.3 14.7

1995–96 Utah 82 82 35.5 .538 .422 .830 2.8 11.2* 1.7 0.2 14.7

1996–97 Utah 82 82 35.3 .548 .422 .846 2.8 10.5 2.0 0.2 14.4

1997–98 Utah 64 64 29.0 .528 .429 .827 2.6 8.5 1.4 0.2 12.0

1998–99 Utah 50 50 28.2 .488 .320 .811 2.9 7.5 1.6 0.3 11.1

1999–00 Utah 82 82 29.7 .501 .355 .860 2.6 8.6 1.7 0.2 12.1

2000–01 Utah 82 82 29.1 .504 .462 .817 2.8 8.7 1.6 0.3 11.5

2001–02 Utah 82 82 31.3 .517 .321 .857 3.2 8.2 1.9 0.3 13.4

2002–03 Utah 82 82 27.7 .483 .363 .826 2.5 7.7 1.7 0.2 10.8

Career 1504 1300 31.8 .515 .384 .826 2.7 10.5 2.2 0.2 13.1

All-Star 10 5 19.7 .530 .333 .667 1.7 7.1 1.6 0.1 8.1

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1985 Utah 9 0 18.6 .467 .000 .743 2.8 4.3 1.1 0.2 6.8

1986 Utah 4 0 14.3 .529 1.000 .889 1.5 3.5 1.3 0.0 6.8

1987 Utah 5 2 31.4 .621 .800 .729 2.2 8.0 3.0 0.2 10.0

1988 Utah 11 11 43.5 .507 .286 .824 4.1 14.8 3.4 0.3 19.5

1989 Utah 3 3 46.3 .508 .750 .905 3.3 13.7 3.7 1.7 27.3

1990 Utah 5 5 38.8 .420 .077 .800 3.2 15.0 1.2 0.0 15.0

1991 Utah 9 9 41.4 .537 .407 .841 4.7 13.8 2.2 0.2 18.2

1992 Utah 16 16 38.9 .423 .310 .833 2.9 13.6 2.1 0.3 14.8

1993 Utah 5 5 38.6 .451 .385 .833 2.4 11.0 2.4 0.0 13.2

1994 Utah 16 16 37.3 .456 .167 .810 3.3 9.8 1.7 0.5 14.4

1995 Utah 5 5 38.6 .459 .400 .765 3.4 10.2 1.4 0.2 17.8

1996 Utah 18 18 37.7 .446 .289 .814 3.2 10.8 1.6 0.4 11.1

1997 Utah 20 20 37.0 .521 .380 .856 3.9 9.6 1.7 0.3 16.1

1998 Utah 20 20 29.8 .494 .346 .718 3.0 7.8 1.6 0.2 11.1

1999 Utah 11 11 32.0 .400 .333 .739 3.3 8.4 1.6 0.1 11.1

2000 Utah 10 10 35.0 .461 .389 .767 3.0 10.3 1.3 0.2 11.2

2001 Utah 5 5 37.2 .459 .000 .714 5.6 11.4 2.0 0.6 9.8

2002 Utah 4 4 35.3 .450 .286 .923 4.0 10.0 2.8 0.3 12.5

2003 Utah 5 5 29.8 .462 .000 1.000 3.2 5.2 1.6 0.2 11.2

Career 182 165 35.2 .473 .326 .810 3.3 10.1 1.9 0.3 13.4

See also[edit]

List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career games played leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career assists leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career steals leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career turnovers leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career free throw scoring leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career minutes played leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff assists leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff steals leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association career playoff turnovers leaders List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most assists in a game List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association players with most steals in a game List of National Basketball
Basketball
Association seasons played leaders List of NBA players who have spent their entire career with one franchise

References[edit]

^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-03-11. Retrieved 2009-06-10.  ^ "NBA All-Time Assists Leaders – National Basketball
Basketball
Association – ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "NBA All-Time Steals Leaders – National Basketball
Basketball
Association – ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-08-18. Retrieved 2010-08-14.  ^ a b c Schulz, Tom. "NBA Hall of Famer John Stockton
John Stockton
Joins Montana State Women's Basketball
Basketball
Staff". MSUbobcats.com. Montana State University. Retrieved October 27, 2015.  ^ "1". Freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ Rushin, Steve (July 27, 1992). "City of stars". Sports Illustrated. p. 62.  ^ Weaver, Dan (September 17, 1990). "Stockton: one of NBA's premier point guards sweated his way to superstar status". Spokesman-Review. p. C1.  ^ Goodwin, Dale (Feb 22, 1980). "Stockton: Slow to grow, quick to score". Spokesman-Review. p. 22.  ^ a b Goodwin, Dale (April 7, 1980). "Stockton to enroll at Gonzaga". Spokesman-Review. p. 23.  ^ "Hillock gets Gonzaga job". Spokane Daily Chronicle. March 4, 1981. p. 21.  ^ Blackwell, Dave (June 20, 1984). "Stockton pick hailed as Jazz coup". Deseret News. p. G-1.  ^ Blanchette, John (April 24, 1984). "Stockton makes Olympic cut". Spokesman-Review. p. C1.  ^ Weaver, Dan (April 30, 1984). "What's the going price of gold?". Spokane Chronicle. p. 11.  ^ Blanchette, John (May 14, 1984). " Basketball
Basketball
school is over for Stockton". Spokesman-Review. p. 13.  ^ a b c d " John Stockton
John Stockton
on Jordan, Malone and post-NBA life". CNN. November 11, 2013.  ^ a b Blackwell, Dave (June 19, 1984). "Jazz surprise by taking Stockton". Deseret News. p. D-1.  ^ Hamilton, Linda (June 20, 1984). "The more you see him, the more you like him". Deseret News. p. G-6.  ^ Genessy, Jody (August 14, 2010). "Utah Jazz: For Karl Malone, John Stockton, Dream Team erased memories". Deseret News. Retrieved July 6, 2011.  ^ Hamilton, Linda (June 15, 1998). "Stockton thought last shot was in". Deseret News. p. 1. Retrieved July 9, 2011.  ^ Buckley, Tim (2003-06-08). "The Long Goodbye". Salt Lake City: Deseret News. Archived from the original (Reprint) on 2009-01-04. Retrieved 2008-08-20.  ^ Genessy, Jody (September 9, 2009). "Utah Jazz: Stockton chooses Isiah, Sloan picks Barkley as HOF presenters". Deseret News. Retrieved May 3, 2012.  ^ McEntegart, Pete (2007-01-19). "Best Players to Never Win a Championship" (Electronic). online: ESPN.com. Retrieved 2009-02-14.  ^ "NBA Basketball
Basketball
Statistics, Draft, Awards, and History". DatabaseBasketball.com. Archived from the original on 2016-10-14. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "NBA Basketball
Basketball
Statistics, Draft, Awards, and History". DatabaseBasketball.com. Archived from the original on 2016-10-14. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ " John Stockton
John Stockton
Game By Game Stats and Performance – ESPN". Espn.go.com. 1962-03-26. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "NBA & ABA Career Leaders and Records for Steals". Basketball-Reference.com. 1970-01-01. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "The Dirtiest Player?". CNN. April 14, 1997.  ^ " John Stockton
John Stockton
NBA Stats". Basketball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "ESPN.com: NBA – Stockton let his game speak for him". Static.espn.go.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "ESPN.com – NBA – DAILY DIME: SPECIAL EDITION 10 greatest point guards ever". Sports.espn.go.com. 2006-05-11. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ McCallum, Jack (April 25, 1988). "Not a passing fancy". Sports Illustrated: 72.  ^ "Philly.com: Health and Medical News". www.philly.com. Retrieved 8 December 2017.  ^ a b c d e http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/wire?section=ncb&id=3037152 ^ MontanaGrizzlies.com :: The original source for Montana Grizzly sports since 1999 ^ The Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
Will Host The Most Utah Jazz
Utah Jazz
NBA Draft Workout Ever On Tuesday - Ridiculous Upside — "The most interesting player to show up at the workout will be Stockton, simply based on name recognition alone after playing the last four seasons for the NAIA's Westminster Griffins" ^ " Michael Stockton signs pro contract with German team". Deseret News. 2011-07-21. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-10-04. Retrieved 2013-10-04.  ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-10-05. Retrieved 2013-03-01.  ^ "Shawn Stockton Stats, Bio – ESPN". Espn.go.com. 1989-12-12. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ "Seattle Pacific University Athletics – SPU's Stockton is GNAC Player of the Week". Spufalcons.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ Josh Furlong (2013-11-15). " John Stockton
John Stockton
embarks on autobiography book tour". KSL.com. Retrieved 2016-09-10.  ^ Genessy, Jody (May 30, 2013). "Utah Jazz: John Stockton autobiography 'Assisted' to hit shelves this fall". Deseret News.  ^ Stein, Marc (May 14, 2014). "Jazz to gauge John Stockton
John Stockton
interest". ESPN. Retrieved September 6, 2016. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to John Stockton.

NBA history profile John Stockton
John Stockton
at the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
(archived April 13, 2009) at NBA.com Basketball-Reference.com: John Stockton John Stockton
John Stockton
Naismith Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame enshrinement speech on YouTube

Links to related articles

v t e

1984 NBA Draft

First round

Hakeem Olajuwon Sam Bowie Michael Jordan Sam Perkins Charles Barkley Melvin Turpin Alvin Robertson Lancaster Gordon Otis Thorpe Leon Wood Kevin Willis Tim McCormick Jay Humphries Michael Cage Terence Stansbury John Stockton Jeff Turner Vern Fleming Bernard Thompson Tony Campbell Kenny Fields Tom Sewell Earl Jones Michael Young

Second round

Devin Durrant Victor Fleming Ron Anderson Cory Blackwell Stuart Gray Steve Burtt Jay Murphy Eric Turner Steve Colter Tony Costner Othell Wilson Charles Jones Ben Coleman Charlie Sitton Danny Young Anthony Teachey Tom Sluby Willie White Greg Wiltjer Fred Reynolds Gary Plummer Jerome Kersey Ronnie Williams

v t e

United States squad – 1992 Tournament of the Americas
1992 Tournament of the Americas
– Gold medal

4 Laettner 5 Robinson 6 Ewing 7 Bird 8 Pippen 9 Jordan 10 Drexler 11 Malone 12 Stockton 13 Mullin 14 Barkley 15 Johnson Coach: Daly

v t e

United States men's basketball squad – 1992 Summer Olympics
1992 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Laettner 5 Robinson 6 Ewing 7 Bird 8 Pippen 9 Jordan 10 Drexler 11 Malone 12 Stockton 13 Mullin 14 Barkley 15 Johnson Coach: Daly

v t e

United States men's basketball squad – 1996 Summer Olympics
1996 Summer Olympics
– Gold medal

4 Barkley 5 Hill 6 Hardaway 7 Robinson 8 Pippen 9 Richmond 10 Miller 11 Malone 12 Stockton 13 O'Neal 14 Payton 15 Olajuwon Coach: Wilkens

v t e

National Basketball
Basketball
Association's 50 Greatest Players in NBA History

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Nate Archibald Paul Arizin Charles Barkley Rick Barry Elgin Baylor Dave Bing Larry Bird Wilt Chamberlain Bob Cousy Dave Cowens Billy Cunningham Dave DeBusschere Clyde Drexler Julius Erving Patrick Ewing Walt Frazier George Gervin Hal Greer John Havlicek Elvin Hayes Magic Johnson Sam Jones Michael Jordan Jerry Lucas Karl Malone Moses Malone Pete Maravich Kevin McHale George Mikan Earl Monroe Hakeem Olajuwon Shaquille O'Neal Robert Parish Bob Pettit Scottie Pippen Willis Reed Oscar Robertson David Robinson Bill Russell Dolph Schayes Bill Sharman John Stockton Isiah Thomas Nate Thurmond Wes Unseld Bill Walton Jerry West Lenny Wilkens James Worthy

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

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NBA All-Star
NBA All-Star
Game Most Valuable Player Award

1951: Macauley 1952: Arizin 1953: Mikan 1954: Cousy 1955: Sharman 1956: Pettit 1957: Cousy 1958: Pettit 1959: Baylor & Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Robertson 1962: Pettit 1963: Russell 1964: Robertson 1965: Lucas 1966: A. Smith 1967: Barry 1968: Greer 1969: Robertson 1970: Reed 1971: Wilkens 1972: West 1973: Cowens 1974: Lanier 1975: Frazier 1976: Bing 1977: Erving 1978: R. Smith 1979: Thompson 1980: Gervin 1981: Archibald 1982: Bird 1983: Erving 1984: Thomas 1985: Sampson 1986: Thomas 1987: Chambers 1988: Jordan 1989: Malone 1990: Johnson 1991: Barkley 1992: Johnson 1993: Stockton & Malone 1994: Pippen 1995: Richmond 1996: Jordan 1997: Rice 1998: Jordan 1999: No game played 2000: O'Neal & Duncan 2001: Iverson 2002: Bryant 2003: Garnett 2004: O'Neal 2005: Iverson 2006: James 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Bryant & O'Neal 2010: Wade 2011: Bryant 2012: Durant 2013: Paul 2014: Irving 2015: Westbrook 2016: Westbrook 2017: Davis

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NBA season assists leaders

1947: Calverley 1948: Dallmar 1949: Davies 1950: McGuire 1951: Phillip 1952: Phillip 1953: Cousy 1954: Cousy 1955: Cousy 1956: Cousy 1957: Cousy 1958: Cousy 1959: Cousy 1960: Cousy 1961: Robertson 1962: Robertson 1963: Rodgers 1964: Robertson 1965: Robertson 1966: Robertson 1967: Rodgers 1968: Chamberlain 1969: Robertson 1970: Wilkens 1971: Van Lier 1972: West 1973: Archibald 1974: DiGregorio 1975: Porter 1976: Watts 1977: Buse 1978: Porter 1979: Porter 1980: Richardson 1981: Porter 1982: Moore 1983: Johnson 1984: Johnson 1985: Thomas 1986: Johnson 1987: Johnson 1988: Stockton 1989: Stockton 1990: Stockton 1991: Stockton 1992: Stockton 1993: Stockton 1994: Stockton 1995: Stockton 1996: Stockton 1997: Jackson 1998: Strickland 1999: Kidd 2000: Kidd 2001: Kidd 2002: Miller 2003: Kidd 2004: Kidd 2005: Nash 2006: Nash 2007: Nash 2008: Paul 2009: Paul 2010: Nash 2011: Nash 2012: Rondo 2013: Rondo 2014: Paul 2015: Paul 2016: Rondo 2017: Harden

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NBA season steals leaders

1974: Steele 1975: Barry 1976: Watts 1977: Buse 1978: Lee 1979: Carr 1980: Richardson 1981: Johnson 1982: Johnson 1983: Richardson 1984: Green 1985: Richardson 1986: Robertson 1987: Robertson 1988: Jordan 1989: Stockton 1990: Jordan 1991: Robertson 1992: Stockton 1993: Jordan 1994: McMillan 1995: Pippen 1996: Payton 1997: Blaylock 1998: Blaylock 1999: Gill 2000: Jones 2001: Iverson 2002: Iverson 2003: Iverson 2004: Davis 2005: Hughes 2006: Wallace 2007: Davis 2008: Paul 2009: Paul 2010: Rondo 2011: Paul 2012: Paul 2013: Paul 2014: Paul 2015: Leonard 2016: Curry 2017: Green

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Naismith Memorial Basketball
Basketball
Hall of Fame Class of 2009

Players

Michael Jordan David Robinson John Stockton

Coaches

Jerry Sloan C. Vivian Stringer

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West Coast Conference Men's Basketball
Basketball
Player of the Year

1953: Sears 1954: None selected 1955: Sears 1956: Russell 1957: Farmer 1958: Farmer & Wright 1959: Doss & Wright 1960: Grote 1961: Meschery 1962: Dinnel & Gray 1963: Gray 1964: Johnson 1965: Johnson 1966: Swagerty 1967: Swagerty 1968: Adelman 1969: Awtrey 1970: Awtrey 1971: Gianelli 1972: Stewart 1973: Averitt 1974: Oleynick 1975: Sobers 1976: Leite 1977: Cartwright 1978: Cartwright 1979: Cartwright 1980: Rambis 1981: Dailey 1982: Dailey 1983: Phillips & Suttle 1984: Stockton 1985: Polee 1986: Polee 1987: Thompson 1988: Middlebrooks 1989: Gathers 1990: Kimble 1991: Christie 1992: Christie 1993: D. Jones 1994: Brown 1995: Nash 1996: Nash 1997: Garnett 1998: Hendrix 1999: Schraeder 2000: K. Jones 2001: Calvary 2002: Dickau 2003: Stepp 2004: Stepp 2005: Turiaf 2006: Morrison 2007: Denison & Raivio 2008: Pargo 2009: Bryant 2010: Bouldin 2011: McConnell 2012: Dellavedova 2013: Olynyk 2014: Haws 2015: Pangos 2016: Collinsworth 2017: Williams-Goss 2018: Landale

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Utah Jazz

Founded in 1974 Played in New Orleans
New Orleans
(1974–79) Based in Salt Lake City, Utah

Franchise

Franchise Summer League 1974 Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Records Head coaches Seasons Current season

Arenas

Loyola Field House New Orleans
New Orleans
Municipal Auditorium Louisiana Superdome Salt Palace Vivint Smart Home Arena

Personnel

Checketts Gardner Rigby

G League affiliate

Salt Lake City
Salt Lake City
Stars

Administration

Owner: Jazz Basketball
Basketball
Investors, Inc. (represented by Gail Miller, widow of Larry H. Miller) President: Steve Starks Executive VP, Basketball
Basketball
Operations: Kevin O'Connor General Manager: Dennis Lindsey Head coach: Quin Snyder

Retired numbers

1 4 7 9 12 14 32 35 53 1223 Hot Rod Hundley
Hot Rod Hundley
(Microphone)

Hall of Famers

Pete Maravich Adrian Dantley John Stockton Jerry Sloan Hot Rod Hundley Karl Malone

Western Conference Championships (2)

1997 1998

Division titles (9)

1984 1989 1992 1997 1998 2000 2007 2008 2017

Rivals

Houston Rockets

Culture and lore

Jazz Bear Dan Roberts Game 6 of the 1998 NBA Finals Celtic Pride Tiffany Coyne "Kill Gil, Volumes I & II" (The Simpsons episode)

Media

TV AT&T SportsNet Rocky Mountain (current) KJZZ-TV
KJZZ-TV
(former) Radio Radio Network

KZNS-AM KZNS-FM

Announcers Craig Bolerjack Matt Harpring David Locke Ron Boone

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 583122

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