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ILOG was an international software company purchased and incorporated into IBM
IBM
announced in January, 2009. It created enterprise software products for supply chain, business rule management, visualization and optimization. The main product line for Business Rules Management Systems (BRMS) has been rebranded as IBM
IBM
Operational Decision Manager (ODM). Many of the related components retain the ILOG brand as a part of their name. The software developed by the ILOG software company supports several software platforms, including COBOL, C++, C#, .NET, Java, AJAX
AJAX
and Adobe Flex
Adobe Flex
/ AIR. Founded in 1987 in Paris, France, ILOG had its main headquarters in Gentilly, France, and Sunnyvale, California. It also had main offices in Australia, China, Germany, Japan, Singapore and the United Kingdom. Through its acquisition of CPLEX Optimization Inc. in 1997, ILOG became the owner of the CPLEX mathematical programming software, and ILOG's acquisition of LogicTools in 2007 made ILOG the owner of a line of supply chain applications. The CPLEX and other tools also had some minor rebranding under the IBM
IBM
Optimization Suite of tools.

Contents

1 Products 2 Company 3 History 4 Recent developments 5 Customers 6 References 7 External links

Products[edit] ILOG's main products:

IBM
IBM
WebSphere ILOG JRules, a business rule management system (BRMS) that enables both business and IT users to write and maintain the logic applied by applications that automatically implement decisions. IBM
IBM
ILOG Views, a visualization development system and toolkit based on C++
C++
with add ons for charts, maps and reactive graphic objects. This product still exists as Rogue Wave Software
Rogue Wave Software
Views. IBM
IBM
ILOG CPLEX, optimization software for mathematical programming IBM
IBM
ILOG JViews, a visualization development system based on Java and supported with add-ons for Gantt charts, graphs, maps and diagrams IBM
IBM
ILOG Elixir component sets for Adobe AIR
Adobe AIR
and Adobe Flex
Adobe Flex
platforms IBM
IBM
ILOG Supply Chain Apps ILOG Solver was considered the market leader in commercial constraint programming software as of 2006.[1]

Company[edit] ILOG was an international software company. It developed, marketed, sold and supported BRMS, optimization and visualization software components, as well as supply chain applications. ILOG had business locations in nine countries, but it had two principal locations incorporated into IBM:

France: Gentilly, a small town just outside Paris United States: Sunnyvale, California, in Silicon Valley
Silicon Valley
south of San Francisco

History[edit] The name ILOG is an abbreviation of the combination of two French words: "Intelligence" and "Logiciel". These words can be translated as "Intelligent Software."[2] In 1987, ILOG began licensing software components to companies developing software applications. These customers licensed the components in order to add new functionality to their software applications. The software components were initially developed in the LISP programming language, and transitioned to C++
C++
in 1992 in order to follow the technical evolution of the software industry. ILOG introduced two new products in 1993: ILOG Views and ILOG Solver. ILOG customers use them to make visualization interfaces (Views) and resources allocation applications (Solver). Until 1995, ILOG sales were concentrated in Europe, particularly in France. In 1995, the company started to expand globally by establishing a major sales presence in the United States and Asia. In 1997 Apr 19, it acquired CPLEX Optimization, Inc. (CPLEX), located in Incline Village, Nevada, which provided linear-based optimization software products for the supply chain industry. In the late 1990s, ILOG started to introduce Java versions of its products to follow once again the software industry’s technical evolution. It also introduced a business rule management system (BRMS) product in 1996, which gives software engineers the ability to better manage the rules operating their applications. The financial services sector has been the primary market for ILOG's BRMS products, for use in developing, for example, online trading or credit decision making applications. ILOG's BRMS product line is currently the company's largest product line. ILOG also introduced a C# version of some of its visualization products in fiscal year 2004 and of their BRMS products in fiscal year 2005. Until ILOG's initial public offering in 1997 on the NASDAQ National Market (which subsequently became the Nasdaq Stock Market on August 1, 2006), ILOG was financed through a combination of retained earnings, venture capital funding and interest free loans from French government agencies and the European Union. This initial public offering enabled ILOG to acquire CPLEX. In 1998, SAP A.G. invested in ILOG. The financing from SAP was part of the partnership that has made SAP ILOG's biggest customer every year to date. This partnership, along with others, made ILOG a player in the supply chain management market. In 1998, ILOG listed on the Nouveau marché of Euronext Paris
Paris
and in 2005 transferred to Eurolist by Euronext Paris. Recent developments[edit] On October 26, 2006, ILOG acquired 35% of the capital and voting rights of the Chinese company Shanghai FirstTech Co., Ltd. (FirstTech). FirstTech is a systems integrator that develops and markets manufacturing and insurance solutions in the Chinese market. On November 20, 2006, ILOG acquired one-third of the capital and voting rights of Prima Solutions (Prima), a Paris-based supplier of software platforms for the insurance sector. On April 11, 2007, ILOG completed the acquisition of LogicTools, a Chicago-based provider of supply chain planning applications specializing in network design and inventory optimization. LogicTools’ applications are based on the ILOG CPLEX optimization product. On July 28, 2008, IBM
IBM
and ILOG announced an agreement regarding a proposed acquisition by IBM
IBM
of ILOG. On January 6, 2009, the acquisition of ILOG by IBM
IBM
was[3] completed. On July 1, 2009, the "Transfer of Business" letter[4] was issued that confirmed that ILOG was effectively integrated within IBM. This coincided with a fresh release of the ILOG products,[5] which is now branded as an IBM
IBM
ILOG company. Customers[edit] As of 2009, more than 1,000 universities use ILOG Optimization for research and teaching, and more than 1,000 commercial customers, including over 160 of the Global 500, use ILOG Optimization in some of their most important planning and scheduling applications.[6] References[edit]

^ Francesca Rossi; Peter Van Beek; Toby Walsh (2006). Handbook of constraint programming. Elsevier. p. 157 and 517. ISBN 978-0-444-52726-4.  ^ " IBM
IBM
Impact Blog". Blogs.ilog.com. 2012-02-24. Retrieved 2014-07-07.  ^ " IBM
IBM
News room - 2009-01-06 IBM
IBM
Completes Acquisition of ILOG - United States". 304.ibm.com. Retrieved 2014-07-07.  ^ " IBM
IBM
- BRMS - Business Rules Management System IBM". Ilog.com. Retrieved 2014-07-07.  ^ " IBM
IBM
- ILOG is now part of IBM". Ilog.com. Retrieved 2014-07-07.  ^ " IBM
IBM
- Decision Optimization". Ilog.com. Retrieved 2014-07-07. 

External links[edit]

Official ILOG Web site Official IBM
IBM
ODB Web site

v t e

IBM

History

History of IBM Mergers and acquisitions Think (motto) Operating Systems

Products

Cell microprocessor Mainframe Personal Computer IBM
IBM
Power Systems Information Management Software Lotus Software Rational Software SPSS ILOG Tivoli Software: Service Automation Manager WebSphere alphaWorks Criminal Reduction Utilising Statistical History Mashup Center PureQuery Redbooks FlashSystem Fortran Connections

Business entities

Center for The Business of Government Cloud computing Global Services International subsidiaries jStart Kenexa Research The Weather Company
The Weather Company
(Weather Underground)

Facilities

Towers

1250 René-Lévesque, Montreal, QC One Atlantic Center, Atlanta, GA

Software Labs

Rome Software Lab Toronto Software Lab

IBM
IBM
Buildings

330 North Wabash, Chicago, IL Johannesburg Seattle

Research Labs

Africa Almaden Austin Laboratory Australia Brazil China Laboratory Haifa Laboratory India Laboratory Ireland Thomas J. Watson
Thomas J. Watson
Center, New York Tokyo Zurich Laboratory

Facilities

Hakozaki Facility Yamato Facility

Cambridge Scientific Center IBM
IBM
Hursley Canada Head Office Building IBM
IBM
Rochester Somers Office Complex

Initiatives

Academy of Technology Centers for Advanced Studies: CASCON Deep Thunder IBM
IBM
Fellow Pulse conference The Great Mind Challenge DeveloperWorks: Develothon Linux Technology Center IBM
IBM
Virtual Universe Community Smarter Planet World Community Grid

Inventions

Automated teller machine Electronic keypunch Hard disk drive Floppy disk DRAM Relational model Selectric typewriter Financial swaps Universal Product Code Magnetic stripe card Sabre airline reservation system Scanning tunneling microscope

Terminology

Globally Integrated Enterprise Commercial Processing Workload Consumability e-business

CEOs

Thomas J. Watson
Thomas J. Watson
(1914–1956) Thomas Watson Jr.
Thomas Watson Jr.
(1956–1971) T. Vincent Learson
T. Vincent Learson
(1971–1973) Frank T. Cary (1973–1981) John R. Opel (1981–1985) John Fellows Akers (1985–1993) Louis V. Gerstner Jr.
Louis V. Gerstner Jr.
(1993–2002) Samuel J. Palmisano
Samuel J. Palmisano
(2002–2011) Ginni Rometty
Ginni Rometty
(2012–present)

Board of directors

Alain Belda William R. Brody Kenneth Chenault Michael L. Eskew David Farr Shirley Ann Jackson Andrew N. Liveris James McNerney James W. Owens Samuel J. Palmisano Virginia M. Rometty Joan E. Spero Sidney Taurel Lorenzo Zambrano

Other

A Boy and His Atom Common Public License/ IBM
IBM
Public License Customer engineer Deep Blue Deep Thought Dynamic infrastructure GUIDE International IBM
IBM
and the Holocaust IBM
IBM
international chess tournament Lucifer cipher Mathematica IBM
IBM
Plex SHARE computing ScicomP Watson

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