Goole
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Goole is a
port A port is a facility comprising one or more or loading areas, where ships load and discharge and passengers. Although usually situated on a sea coast or estuary, ports can also be found far inland, such as , and ; these access t ...
,
market Market may refer to: *Market (economics) *Market economy *Marketplace, a physical marketplace or public market Geography *Märket, an island shared by Finland and Sweden Art, entertainment, and media Films *Market (1965 film), ''Market'' (1965 ...
town and
civil parish In England, a civil parish is a type of Parish (administrative division), administrative parish used for Local government in England, local government. It is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts ...
in the
East Riding of Yorkshire The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a county in Northern England Northern England, also known as the North of England or simply the North, is the second most northern area of Great Britain Grea ...
, England. The town was
historically History (from Ancient Greek, Greek , ''historia'', meaning "inquiry; knowledge acquired by investigation") is the study of the past. Events occurring before the History of writing#Inventions of writing, invention of writing systems are considered ...
within the
West Riding of Yorkshire The West Riding of Yorkshire is one of three historic subdivisions of Yorkshire Yorkshire (; abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England Northern England, also known as the North ...
. Goole lies on the River Ouse, south of
York York is a cathedral city with Roman origins at the confluence of the rivers River Ouse, Yorkshire, Ouse and River Foss, Foss in North Yorkshire, England. It is the historic county town of Yorkshire. The city has long-standing buildings and str ...

York
and west of
Hull Hull may refer to: Structures * Chassis, of an armored fighting vehicle * Fuselage, of an aircraft * Hull (botany), the outer covering of seeds * Hull (watercraft), the body or frame of a ship * Submarine hull Mathematics * Affine hull, in affin ...
. According to the
2011 UK census A Census in the United Kingdom, census of the population of the United Kingdom is taken every ten years. The 2011 census was held in all countries of the UK on 27 March 2011. It was the first UK census which could be completed online via the Intern ...
, Goole parish had a population of 19,518, an increase on the 2001 UK census figure of 17,600. The port, which is the UK's furthest
inland port An inland port is a on an inland , such as a , , or , which may or may not be connected to the sea. The term "inland port" is also used to refer to a . Examples The publishes biannually a list of such locations and for this purpose states th ...
, is highly versatile and capable of handling nearly 2 million tonnes of cargo per annum, making it one of the most important ports on the east coast of England. Goole is twinned with Złotów in Poland. Goole was informally twinned with
Gibraltar ) , anthem = "God Save the Queen" , song = "Gibraltar Anthem" , image_map = Gibraltar location in Europe.svg , map_alt = Location of Gibraltar in Europe , map_caption = United Kingdom shown in pale green , mapsize = 290px , image_map2 = ...

Gibraltar
in the 1960s; at that time, Gibraltar Court was named in Goole and Goole Court was named in Gibraltar.


Etymology

Unusually for an English place-name 'Goole' has its origins in
Middle English Middle English (abbreviated to ME) was a form of the English language English is a West Germanic languages, West Germanic language first spoken in History of Anglo-Saxon England, early medieval England, which has eventually become the Wor ...
. It derives from the word ''goule'', meaning 'stream' or 'channel', or possibly 'outlet drain'. Not recorded in the ''
Domesday Book Domesday Book () – the spelling of "Doomsday Book" – is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of William I, known as . Domesday has long been associated with the Latin p ...
'', its first mention was in 1362 as ''Gulle''.


History


Background

The Dutch civil engineer
Cornelius Vermuyden Sir Cornelius Vermuyden ( Sint-Maartensdijk, 1595 – London London is the capital city, capital and List of urban areas in the United Kingdom, largest city of England and the United Kingdom. The city stands on the River Thames in the sou ...

Cornelius Vermuyden
diverted the River Don northwards to the River Ouse in 1626–1629 in order to drain the marshland of
Hatfield Chase Hatfield Chase is a low-lying area in South Yorkshire and North Lincolnshire, England, which was often flooded. It was a royal hunting ground until Charles I of England, Charles I appointed the Dutch engineer Cornelius Vermuyden to drain it in 16 ...
at the behest of
King Charles I of the King of the Romans (variant used in the early modern period) File:Nezahualpiltzintli.jpg, Aztec King Nezahualpiltzintli of Texcoco King is the title given to a male monarch in a variety of contexts. The female equivalent is queen re ...

King Charles I
. It made the new lower Don – known as the Dutch River – navigable for
barge A barge is a - , built mainly for and transport of bulk goods. Originally barges were towed by draft horses on an adjacent . Barges have changed throughout time. From 1967-1983 barges were considered a flat bottom boat that was nineteen feet ...

barge
s so that
coal Coal is a black or brownish-black , formed as called . Coal is mostly with variable amounts of other , chiefly , , , and . Coal is formed when dead decays into and is converted into coal by the heat and pressure of deep burial over mill ...

coal
from the
South Yorkshire Coalfield The South Yorkshire Coalfield is so named from its position within Yorkshire. It covers most of South Yorkshire, West Yorkshire and a small part of North Yorkshire. The exposed coalfield outcrops in the Pennines, Pennine foothills and dips under Pe ...
could be transported to the new confluence for transfer to seagoing vessels. There the engineers built a new wooden bridge – rebuilt in iron in the 1890s and now known as the Dutch River Bridge – to the east of which a new village called 'Goole' formed.


Development

In the 1820s the
Aire and Calder Navigation The Aire and Calder Navigation is the canalised River engineering is the process of planned human intervention in the course, characteristics, or flow of a river with the intention of producing some defined benefit. People have intervened in t ...
company proposed development of a new canal to transport coal from the existing broad canal from
Knottingley Knottingley is a town within the City of Wakefield The City of Wakefield is a Local government in England, local government district in West Yorkshire, England, with the status of a City status in the United Kingdom, city and metropolitan bo ...
in the northern sector of the coalfield in 1826. Once it reached Goole the company proposed development of a new
floating dock Floating may refer to: * a type of dental work performed on horse teeth * use of an isolation tank * the guitar-playing technique where chords are sustained rather than scratched * Floating (play), ''Floating'' (play), by Hugh Hughes * Floating (ps ...
capable of handling larger sea-going vessels. Chief engineer Thomas Hamond Bartholomew was instructed to build the canal, docks and an associated company town to house both the dock workers and visiting seamen. Bartholomew commissioned civil engineer and builder Sir Edward Banks company to construct part of the canal and the eight transshipment docks and to lay out the associated new town to the west of the existing wooden bridge. The Banks Arms Hotel on Aire Street – today known as the Lowther Hotel - was in 1824 the first building constructed in what was known as New Goole; ''The Macintosh Arms'' public house on the same street took its name from engineer Hugh McIntosh (civil engineer), Hugh Macintosh. When Goole opened as a port on 20 July 1826 it was a new community of about 450 people. Now it is a town with about 18,000 inhabitants.


Docks

Three locks keep the water in of floating docks at a constant depth of by preventing the level from rising and falling with the tides in the River Ouse. Once ships are within the complex, eight docks provide a total quayside of . Beside the docks are transit sheds where cargo is stored, many of them equipped with overhead cranes. Unlike many ports every one of the eight docks has been in full commercial operation since its construction in the period from 1826 to 1912. William Hamond Bartholomew succeeded his father T. H. Bartholomew in 1853 and in 1863 introduced the Tom Pudding system of compartment boats, which could carry around of coal. On reaching the docks the barges were lifted by large hoists, from which they could be discharged direct into seagoing ships, a system so successful that it competed against rail until 1985. For most of its life the port was most associated with the shipment of coal and associated cargoes, including the importation of pit props. With the demise of mining the former Timber Pond became a marina, trading under the name Goole Boathouse. It has berths for 150 boats. After a period of decline commodities were replaced by containers, the export of steel and the import of timber from north-eastern Europe. Today the Port of Goole has regular cargo liner services to Norway, Sweden, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Spain, Morocco and South Africa and a transshipment route to Europoort, Europort, Rotterdam.


Present

Glass is produced in Goole, which is also the centre of an agricultural district. The town's former large employer was a clothing manufacture for the big multiples but it closed in the late 2000s. Goole has a modestly sized town centre with many high street shops, independent retailers and public houses. The main shopping area is Wesley Square, off Boothferry Road (which has been pedestrianised around the main shopping area). There is a modern retail development in the town centre, a leisure centre next to the Dock (maritime), docks and the Goole and District Hospital, to the north of the town. A theatre and cinema, 'Junction', opened in 2009. Goole has several primary schools and a Goole High School, High School with a sixth-form college attached to it. Goole College is affiliated with Hull College. There are Further Education colleges in Selby,
York York is a cathedral city with Roman origins at the confluence of the rivers River Ouse, Yorkshire, Ouse and River Foss, Foss in North Yorkshire, England. It is the historic county town of Yorkshire. The city has long-standing buildings and str ...

York
, Scunthorpe and Bishop Burton. Goole College runs a scheme for showing the older students at the High School (in year 10 and above) what opportunities the college offers them.


Transport

The Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway built a line from Pontefract and Wakefield in 1848 and the North Eastern Railway connected the port with Doncaster and
Hull Hull may refer to: Structures * Chassis, of an armored fighting vehicle * Fuselage, of an aircraft * Hull (botany), the outer covering of seeds * Hull (watercraft), the body or frame of a ship * Submarine hull Mathematics * Affine hull, in affin ...
in 1870. The prosperity from the coal and general cargo trade with the West Riding of Yorkshire, West Riding industrial area continued for 150 years after the opening of the canal. Today Goole railway station is at the junction of the Hull and Doncaster Branch and the Pontefract Line. Service is provided to Hull Paragon Interchange, Doncaster railway station, Doncaster, Sheffield railway station, Sheffield, Leeds railway station, Leeds and the commuter stations in between. Goole is south of the M62 motorway, M62 linking it with Kingston upon Hull in the east and Leeds and the West Yorkshire urban belt in the west. To the north the A63 road via Howden provides local access to the A19 road to Selby and
York York is a cathedral city with Roman origins at the confluence of the rivers River Ouse, Yorkshire, Ouse and River Foss, Foss in North Yorkshire, England. It is the historic county town of Yorkshire. The city has long-standing buildings and str ...

York
. The M18 motorway (Great Britain), M18 runs west of the town, connecting it with South Yorkshire, the South of England, South and the English Midlands, Midlands. Bus services to surrounding towns and villages are provided by East Yorkshire Motor Services, Stagecoach in Hull and Arriva Yorkshire.


Governance

Before the reform of local government in 1974, brought about by the Local Government Act 1972, Goole was in the
West Riding of Yorkshire The West Riding of Yorkshire is one of three historic subdivisions of Yorkshire Yorkshire (; abbreviated Yorks), formally known as the County of York, is a historic county of Northern England Northern England, also known as the North ...
. It was then placed in the Boothferry (district), Boothferry district of the county of Humberside until that was abolished in 1996. Since 1996 Goole has been in the
East Riding of Yorkshire The East Riding of Yorkshire, or simply East Riding or East Yorkshire, is a county in Northern England Northern England, also known as the North of England or simply the North, is the second most northern area of Great Britain Grea ...
. It is represented by four councillors on the East Riding of Yorkshire Council. Goole is in the parliamentary constituency of Brigg and Goole (UK Parliament constituency), Brigg and Goole, which has been represented in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom, House of Commons since 2010 United Kingdom general election, 2010 by Andrew Percy, a Conservative Party (UK), Conservative.


Landmarks

Goole's most prominent landmarks are its twin water towers, nicknamed 'salt' and 'pepper'. The new white water-tower was the largest in Europe at the time of construction. In the winter months Goole's gas holder on Anderson Road is visible across the north of the town. Many of the Hoist (device), hoists and Crane (machine), cranes on the dockside can be seen across the town. The Steeple (architecture), steeple of Goole Parish Church is tall enough to be seen across the town. The townscape is made up mostly of utility and industrial structures. There is a clock tower in the main shopping district of the town on a roundabout on the site of the former open-air marketplace. West Park, Goole, West Park is an Edwardian park in the town.


Plans

Goole's industrial park, Capitol Park / Goole36, has attracted two large employers: Guardian Industries, which built a glass-manufacturing plant, and Tesco, which built a distribution centre. The arrival of these employers resulted in the creation of hundreds of new jobs. A new Morrisons store opened in Goole on 2 August 2010, on land previously occupied by Timms Mill on Boothferry Road. A new railway Siemens Goole, rolling stock factory was built at the same location during 2018/2019. The plant, owned and operated by Siemens, builds the new tube trains for the Piccadilly line in London.


Sport

Goole Town Cricket Club supports local cricket teams. Of its three teams, the first team plays in the club cricket York & District Senior League. A new clubhouse was constructed in 1996 providing facilities and a bar. Rugby Union is played close to the cricket club at Westfield Banks, sharing facilities with Goole Tennis Club and Goole Viking Striders running club. Goole RUFC currently fields two teams, the first team playing in Yorkshire Division Two. Goole Tennis Centre is a nine-court tennis club on the Westfield Banks site. Goole has two Association football, football teams - Goole A.F.C. and Goole United A.F.C. They currently play in the Northern Premier League Division One South and the Humber Premier League, Humber Premier League Division One respectively. They both play at the Victoria Pleasure Grounds on Marcus Street. The nearest professional teams are Rotherham United F.C., Rotherham United, Doncaster Rovers F.C., Doncaster Rovers, Grimsby Town F.C., Grimsby Town, Hull City A.F.C., Hull City, Leeds United F.C., Leeds United, Barnsley F.C., Barnsley, Scunthorpe United, Sheffield Wednesday F.C., Sheffield Wednesday, Sheffield United F.C., Sheffield United and York City F.C., York City. Goole used to have two golf clubs. The early course, founded in 1900, was at Rawcliffe Park. The later course was at Airmyn Park from 1911 to the Second World War. Currently Goole's nearest golf clubs are the Boothferry Golf Club in Spaldington and Drax Golf Club in Drax, North Yorkshire, Drax.


Media

Radio Medica is a hospital radio, not-for-profit radio station broadcast from the Goole And District Hospital. The town is served by a weekly tabloid (newspaper format), tabloid newspaper, ''Goole Times, The Goole Times'', published since 1853 and sold in Goole and neighbouring parts of the East Riding of Yorkshire.


Notable people

* Roy Clarke, iconic comedy writer, lives in Goole * Sandra's Wedding, a four-piece alternative rock band from Goole * Adi Vines, bassist for the band Swervedriver, born in Goole * Betty, Hazel and Julie Dunderdale, who performed professionally as The Dale Sisters, a human voice, vocal trio (music), trio that had limited record chart, chart success in the early 1960s * Gavin Bryars, composer and double bassist, born in Goole * Nigel Adams, Member of Parliament for Selby and Ainsty, born in Goole Hospital * Anne Greaves (1889–) was the first woman to become a member of the Institute of Quarrying and created artificial stone through her quarrying company


Gallery

File:Gatesby Road, Goole - geograph.org.uk - 1776354.jpg, Gatesby Road File:Goole Town, Windmill and Methodist Church (geograph 2083907).jpg, Goole Town, Windmill and Methodist Church File:View over Kingsway Bridge.jpg, View over Kingsway Bridge after snowfall


References


General

* *


External links


Goole Town Council

Goole Civic Society
{{authority control Goole, Ports and harbours of Yorkshire Port cities and towns of the North Sea Civil parishes in the East Riding of Yorkshire Towns in the East Riding of Yorkshire