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First Great Western declined a contractual option to continue the Greater Western franchise beyond 2013, citing a desire for a longer-term contract due to the impending upgrade to the Great Western Main Line.[40] The franchise was put out to tender,[48][49][50] but the process was halted and later scrapped due to the fallout from the collapse of the InterCity West Coast franchise competition.[51] A two-year franchise extension until September 2015 was agreed in October 2013,[52][53] and subsequently extended until March 2019.[54][55][56] The CrossCountry franchise is also due to expire in 2019.[57]

The line through Filton Abbey Wood was due to have been electrified by 2017 as part of the Great Western Main Line electrification project, however this has been postponed indefinitely.[58][59][60] The Cross Country Route, the Bristol to Exeter line and the Heart of Wessex Line were not set to be electrified, so services at Filton Abbey Wood would still have been provided by diesel trains; however many "Sprinter" units have been replaced by Class 165 and 166 "Turbo" units.[61][62] The group Friends of Suburban Bristol Railways supports the electrification continuing beyond the main lines,[63][64] as does MP for Weston-super-Mare John Penrose.[65][66] The electrification scheme also included the four-tracking of the line through Filton to allow more services between Bristol Parkway and Bristol Temple Meads and to separate fast inter-city services from local stopping services, which was completed in November 2018.[67][68][69] A fourth platform has been added in November 2018 as part of the project.[70][71]

Filton Abbey Wood is on the Weston-super-Mare/Yate corridor, one of the main axes of the Greater Bristol Metro, a rail transport plan which aims to enhance transport capacity in the Bristol area. The plan will also see the reopening of the Henbury Loop Line and the opening of a new station at Ashley Hill between Filton and Stapleton Road.[72][73][74]

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f There is some ambiguity about exactly when the first Filton railway station closed and the second opened. Butt's 1995 book[21] states 1886, but Oakley[22] and Maggs[23] both state 1903. 1903 would tie in with the new station being built as a junction for the GWR's Badminton Line, whereas 1886 would mean an entirely new station was built only months after the original station had a second platform built.
  2. ^ a b c d Railways in the United Kingdom are, for historical reasons, measured in miles and chains. There are 80 chains to the mile.
  3. ^ Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Filton Abbey Wood, from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b OS Landranger Map 172 – Bristol & Bath. Southampton: [5][note 2] There were two platforms, each 108 metres (118 yd) long, separated by two running lines.[6] A ramped footbridge connected the platforms at the north end, and each platform had ground-level access from the sides: the eastern, southbound platform from MoD Abbey Wood; the western, northbound platform via a footpath from the car park to the north. There were metal and glass shelters on each platform and a small, rarely used booking office on the southbound platform.[22]

    Initial services at the station included local stopping services from Bristol to South Wales, and services between Gloucester and Westbury. Services towards Bath were of particular importance to the MoD, as many of their staff had been based there prior to the construction of MoD Abbey Wood.[22] South Gloucestershire council provided a subsidy for half-hourly services to Bath.[32] The station proved popular with MoD workers, local residents commuting into central Bristol, and also students and staff at the University of the West of England.[22]

    When the railway was privatised in 1997, local services were franchised to Wales & West,[33] which was succeeded by Wessex Trains in 2001.[34] The line through Filton closed for two weeks in June 2004 to enable the construction of a new platform and third running line on the west side of the station, separating trains towards Bristol Parkway from trains towards Wales before the station, and so allowing through-trains to pass stopping trains.[6][35] The project cost £16 million,[36] and caused the complete suspension of Severn Beach Line services to allow longer-distance services to use it as a diversion.[37]

    The Wessex franchise was amalgamated with the Great Western franchise into the Greater Western franchise from 2006, and responsibility passed to First Great Western which was subsequently rebranded as Great Western Railway in 2015.[38][39][40][41] First introduced new services between Bristol Parkway and Weston-super-Mare, and between Cardiff Central and Taunton, each calling at Filton Abbey Wood.[42][43] From December 2006, Virgin CrossCountry began operating a single daily service Newcastle to Cardiff Central via Bristol Temple Meads and Filton Abbey Wood.[44][45] This service was taken over by Arriva CrossCountry when the CrossCountry franchise changed hands in 2007,[46] and then replaced by a daily service each direction between Cardiff Central and Manchester Piccadilly.[47] A three-week closure of the line and station in late October & early/mid November 2018 saw all trains replaced by buses between Bristol Parkway and Bristol Temple Meads and on the Severn Beach branch whilst the four track layout between Dr Day's Junction and Filton Junction was reinstated, also bringing a new fourth platform at Filton Abbey Wood into use and short extensions to the southern ends of the other three platforms to fully accommodate 5 carriage 23 metre vehicle trains.

    First Great Western declined a contractual option to continue the Greater Western franchise beyond 2013, citing a desire for a longer-term contract due to the impending upgrade to the Great Western Main Line.[40] The franchise was put out to tender,[48][49][50] but the process was halted and later scrapped due to the fallout from the collapse of the InterCity West Coast franchise competition.[51] A two-year franchise extension until September 2015 was agreed in October 2013,[52][53] and subsequently extended until March 2019.[54][55][56] The CrossCountry franchise is also due to expire in 2019.[57]

    The line through Filton Abbey Wood was due to have been electrified by 2017 as part of the Great Western Main Line electrification project, however this has been postponed indefinitely.[58][59][60] The Cross Country Route, the Bristol to Exeter line and the Heart of Wessex Line were not set to be electrified, so services at Filton Abbey Wood would still have been provided by diesel trains; however many "Sprinter" units have been replaced by Class 165 and 166 "Turbo" units.[61][62] The group Friends of Suburban Bristol Railways supports the electrification continuing beyond the main lines,[63][64] as does MP for Weston-super-Mare John Penrose.[65][66] The electrification scheme also included the four-tracking of the line through Filton to allow more services between Bristol Parkway and Bristol Temple Meads and to separate fast inter-city services from local stopping services, which was completed in November 2018.[67][68][69] A fourth platform has been added in November 2018 as part of the project.[70][71]

    Filton Abbey Wood is on the Weston-super-Mare/Yate corridor, one of the main axes of the Greater Bristol Metro, a rail transport plan which aims to enhance transport capacity in the Bristol area. The plan will also see the reopening of the Henbury Loop Line and the opening of a new station at Ashley Hill between Filton and Stapleton Road.[72][73][74]

    Notes

    1. ^ a b c d e f There is some ambiguity about exactly when the first Filton railway station closed and the second opened. Butt's 1995 book[21] states 1886, but Oakley[22] and Maggs[23] both state 1903. 1903 would tie in with the new station being built as a junction for the GWR's Badminton Line, whereas 1886 would mean an entirely new station was built only months after the original station had a second platform built.
    2. ^ a b c d Railways in the United Kingdom are, for historical reasons, measured in miles and chains. There are 80 chains to the mile.
    3. ^ Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Filton Abbey Wood, from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year. The line through Filton Abbey Wood was due to have been electrified by 2017 as part of the Great Western Main Line electrification project, however this has been postponed indefinitely.[58][59][60] The Cross Country Route, the Bristol to Exeter line and the Heart of Wessex Line were not set to be electrified, so services at Filton Abbey Wood would still have been provided by diesel trains; however many "Sprinter" units have been replaced by Class 165 and 166 "Turbo" units.[61][62] The group Friends of Suburban Bristol Railways supports the electrification continuing beyond the main lines,[63][64] as does MP for Weston-super-Mare John Penrose.[65][66] The electrification scheme also included the four-tracking of the line through Filton to allow more services between Bristol Parkway and Bristol Temple Meads and to separate fast inter-city services from local stopping services, which was completed in November 2018.[67][68][69] A fourth platform has been added in November 2018 as part of the project.[70][71]

      Filton Abbey Wood is on the Weston-super-Mare/Yate corridor, one of the main axes of the Greater Bristol Metro, a rail transport plan which aims to enhance transport capacity in the Bristol area. The plan will also see the reopening of the Henbury Loop Line and the opening of a new station at Ashley Hill between Filton and Stapleton Road.[72][73][74]