HOME
        TheInfoList






Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

Related lists

References

Notes

  1. ^ 1,000 lb was the nominal weight of these Medium Capacity bombs[citation needed]

Citations

  1. ^ Gobel, Greg. "DH Venom / DH Sea Vixen." vectorsite.net, 1 April 2009. Retrieved: 15 August 2019.
  2. ^ Hartley, Keith (28 November 2014). The Political Economy of Aerospace Industries: A Key Driver of Growth and International Competitiveness?. Edward Elgar Publishing. ISBN 978-1-78254-496-8.
  3. ^ Gunston 1981, p. 52.
  4. ^ a b c Fredriksen 2001, p. 91.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Birtles 1999, p. 61.
  6. ^ Thetford 1962, p. 186.
  7. ^ Birtles Air Pictorial July 1971, p. 242.
  8. ^ a b c d Birtles 1999, p. 63.
  9. ^ a b Birtles 1999, p. 64.
  10. ^ Birtles Air Pictorial July 1971, p. 243.
  11. ^ a b Birtles 1999, p. 72.
  12. ^ Birtles Air Pictorial August 1971, pp. 281–282.
  13. ^ Birtles 1999, pp. 72–73.
  14. ^ Birtles 1999, pp. 73, 75.
  15. ^ Birtles 1999, p. 75.
  16. ^ a b Birtles 1999, pp. 75–76.
  17. ^ Birtles Air Pictorial July 1971, p. 244.
  18. ^ a b The British Fighter since 1912 p. 363.
  19. ^ a b Aircraft of the Royal Air Force since 1918 pp. 235–236.
  20. ^ a b Pilot's Notes Venom FB Mk 4: 2nd edition A.P.4335D pp. 9, 37.
  21. ^ a b c Birtles 1999, p. 67.
  22. ^ a b c Polish Aviation Museum (PAL) has British-built Sea Venom, which was used for experiments at de Havilland and Aeroplane and Armament Experimental Establishment, and then was transferred to Imperial War Museum, which sold it to PAL in 2013.[73]

    Although the Venom was, for a time, a popular and cheap warbird the number of airworthy aircraft is dwindling. Currently there are two in the UK that fly regularly, along with a single example in Switzerland, that flew from 1988 until 2011, when it went to New Zealand. World Heritage Air Museum fleet owns 1 Venom (tail number N202DM) and operated an additional Venom (tail number N747J). N747J crashed on 20 July 2018, while preparing for the EAA AirVenture Show, killing the pilot, World Heritage Aviation Museum co-founder, Martin J. Tibbits.[74] All are licence-built Swiss examples.[citation needed]

    Data from Fighters of the Fifties,[75] International Warplanes[4]

    General characteristics

    • Crew: 1
    • Length: 31 ft 10 in (9.70 m)
    • Wingspan: 41 ft 8 in (12.70 m)
    • Height: 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
    • Wing area: 279 sq ft (25.9 m2)
    • Empty weight: 9,202 lb (4,174 kg)
    • Gross weight: 15,400 lb (6,985 kg)
    • Powerplant: 1 × de Havilland Ghost 103 centrifugal-flow turbojet engine, 4,850 lbf (21.6 kN) thrust

    Performance

    • Maximum speed: 640 mph (1,030 km/h, 560 kn)
    • Range: 1,080 mi (1,740 km, 940 nmi)
    • Service ceiling: 39,400 ft (12,000 m)
    • Rate of climb: 9,000 ft/min (46 m/s)
    • Wing loading: 56.17 lb/sq ft (274.2 kg/m2)
    • Thrust/weight: 0.41

    Armament

    See also

    Notes

    1. ^ 1,000 lb was the nominal weight of these Medium Capacity bombs[citation needed]

    Citations