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The Info List - Coraciiformes


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For prehistoric taxa, see text.

Global distribution of the kingfisher and allies.

The Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
are a group of usually colorful birds including the kingfishers, the bee-eaters, the rollers, the motmots, and the todies. They generally have syndactyly, with three forward-pointing toes (and toes 3 & 4 fused at their base), though in many kingfishers one of these is missing. This is largely an Old World
Old World
order, with the representation in the New World limited to the dozen or so species of todies and motmots, and a mere handful of the more than a hundred species of kingfishers. The name Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
means "raven-like", which is a misnomer (ravens are passerines). Specifically, it comes from the Latin language "corax", meaning "raven" and Latin "forma", meaning "form", which is the standard ending for bird orders.[1]

Contents

1 Systematics 2 Taxonomic sequence 3 See also 4 References 5 External links

Systematics[edit]

Extinct kingfisher from the Messel Pit

This order has been seen to be something of a mixed assortment, and the Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
may be considered as including only the rollers. All the other families would then be considered to represent lineages of birds distantly related to Coraciiformes. This seems to be oversplitting, as most Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
indeed form a reasonably robust clade. Analysis of nDNA c-myc and RAG-1 exon as well as mtDNA myoglobin intron 2 sequence data demonstrates that the Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
can be divided into a basal group that is not too distantly related to the Piciformes, and a derived suborder containing mainly kingfishers (Johansson & Ericson, 2003). The cuckoo roller's true affinities appear to lie elsewhere[citation needed]. The trogons and hornbills are either very basal lineages, or might be considered distinct own orders; the latter are apparently slightly closer to the rollers than the former. The entire group (possibly excluding the cuckoo roller) and the Piciformes
Piciformes
are closely related to the Passeriformes
Passeriformes
(Johansson & Ericson 2003; see also near passerine). Several extinct coraciiform families are only known from Paleogene fossils. They probably belong to the basal group and are sometimes difficult to assign because they were even closer still to the Piciformes
Piciformes
(see also Neanis). In addition, there are some prehistoric genera which are likewise difficult to place into a family. At least the Eocoraciidae are very basal, but the Late Eocene
Eocene
(some 35 mya) Geranopteridae form a superfamily Coracioidea with the extant rollers and ground-rollers already (Mayr & Mourer-Chauviré 2000). A few prehistoric taxa of the present-day families have been described; see the family articles for details. Taxonomic sequence[edit] Unresolved

Genus
Genus
Quasisyndactylus (fossil; Middle Eocene
Middle Eocene
of Messel, Germany) - alcediniform, basal? Genus
Genus
Cryptornis (fossil; Late Eocene
Eocene
of France) – bucerotid? geranopterid? Family Primobucconidae (fossil), including Primobucco and Septencoracias Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
gen. et spp. indet. PQ 1216, QU 15640 (fossil; Late Eocene
Eocene
of Quercy, France: Mayr & Mourer-Chauviré 2000) Genus
Genus
Protornis (fossil: Oligocene of Switzerland) – basal to motmotids and meropids?

A recent study suggest that the following families may belong to a separate order called Bucerotiformes. The results still in dispute though.[2]

Family Bucorvidae
Bucorvidae
(ground hornbills) Family Bucerotidae
Bucerotidae
(hornbills) Family Upupidae
Upupidae
(hoopoe) Family Phoeniculidae
Phoeniculidae
(woodhoopoes)

The Leptosomatidae
Leptosomatidae
(cuckoo roller) probably do not belong here. The trogons are sometimes placed here as a family Trogonidae. The Late Eocene
Eocene
Palaeospizidae are sometimes also placed in the Coraciiformes, as are the Early to Middle Eocene
Middle Eocene
Primobucconidae and the Middle Eocene
Eocene
to Early Oligocene Sylphornithidae. The Primobucconidae at least indeed seem to belong here. Basal group

Family Eocoraciidae (fossil; Middle Eocene
Middle Eocene
of Messel, Germany) Family Geranopteridae (fossil; Late Eocene
Eocene
of Quercy, France – Early Miocene of Czech Republic) - includes "Nupharanassa" bohemica Family Coraciidae
Coraciidae
(rollers) Family Brachypteraciidae
Brachypteraciidae
(ground-rollers) Family Meropidae
Meropidae
(bee-eaters)

Suborder
Suborder
Alcedini

Family Todidae
Todidae
(todies) Family Momotidae
Momotidae
(motmots) Family Alcedinidae
Alcedinidae
(kingfishers)

See also[edit] List of Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
by population References[edit]

^ Amadon, with a foreword by Dean (1980). The Audubon Society encyclopedia of North American birds (1st ed.). New York: A. A. Knopf. p. 104. ISBN 0-394-46651-9.  ^ "Bucerotiformes". tolweb.org. Retrieved 31 March 2018. 

Johansson, Ulf S. & Ericson, Per G. P. (2003): Molecular support for a sister group relationship between Pici and Galbulae (Piciformes sensu Wetmore 1960). J. Avian Biol. 34(2): 185–197. doi:10.1034/j.1600-048X.2003.03103.x PDF fulltext Mayr, Gerald & Mourer-Chauviré, Cécile (2000): Rollers (Aves: Coraciiformes. s.s.) from the Middle Eocene
Middle Eocene
of Messel (Germany) and the Upper Eocene
Eocene
of the Quercy (France). J. Vertebr. Paleontol. 20(3): 533–546. DOI:10.1671/0272-4634(2000)020[0533:RACSSF]2.0.CO;2 PDF fulltext Terres, John K. (1980) The Audubon Society Encyclopedia of North American Birds. ISBN 0-394-46651-9

External links[edit]

Order Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
- Biodiversity Overview: Untamed Science Tree of Life: Coraciiformes

v t e

Birds (class: Aves)

Anatomy

Bird
Bird
anatomy Flight Eggs Feathers Plumage Beak Vision Dactyly Preen gland

Behaviour

Singing Intelligence Migration Sexual selection Lek mating Seabird
Seabird
breeding Incubation Brood parasites Nesting Hybrids

Evolution

Origin of birds Origin of flight Evolution
Evolution
of birds Darwin's finches Seabirds

Fossil
Fossil
birds

Archaeopteryx Omnivoropterygiformes Confuciusornithiformes Enantiornithes Chaoyangiiformes Patagopterygiformes Ambiortiformes Songlingornithiformes Apsaraviformes Gansuiformes Ichthyornithiformes Hesperornithes Lithornithiformes Dinornithiformes Aepyornithiformes Gastornithiformes

Human interaction

Ringing Ornithology Bird
Bird
collections Birdwatching Bird
Bird
feeding Conservation Aviculture Waterfowl hunting Cockfighting Pigeon racing Falconry Pheasantry Egg
Egg
collecting Ornithomancy

Lists

Families and orders Genera Glossary of bird terms List by population Lists by region Recently extinct birds Late Quaternary prehistoric birds Notable birds

Individuals Fictional

Neornithes

Palaeognathae

Struthioniformes (ostriches) Rheiformes (rheas) Tinamiformes (tinamous) Apterygiformes (kiwis) Casuariiformes
Casuariiformes
(emus and cassowaries)

Neognathae

Galloanserae (fowls)

Anseriformes (waterfowls)

Anatidae (ducks)

Anatinae Anserinae

swans true geese

Aythyinae Dendrocygninae Merginae Oxyurinae Plectropterinae Stictonettinae Tadorninae Thalassorninae

Anhimidae

Anhima Chauna

Anseranatidae

Anatalavis Anseranas

Galliformes (landfowls- gamebirds)

Cracidae

Cracinae Oreophasinae Penelopinae

Megapodidae

Aepypodius Alectura Eulipoa Leipoa Macrocephalon Megapodius Talegalla

Numididae

Acryllium Agelastes Guttera Numida

Odontophoridae

Callipepla Colinus Cyrtonyx Dactylortyx Dendrortyx Odontophorus Oreortyx Philortyx Rhynchortyx

Phasianidae

Meleagridinae Perdicinae Phasianinae
Phasianinae
(pheasants and relatives) Tetraoninae

Neoaves

Columbea

Columbimorphae

Columbiformes
Columbiformes
(doves and pigeons) Mesitornithiformes (mesites) Pteroclidiformes (sandgrouses)

Mirandornithes

Phoenicopteriformes (flamingos) Podicipediformes (grebes)

Passerea

Otidimorphae

Cuculiformes (cuckoos) Musophagiformes (turacos) Otidiformes (bustards)

Strisores

Caprimulgiformes
Caprimulgiformes
(nightjars and relatives) Steatornithiformes Podargiformes Apodiformes
Apodiformes
(swifts and hummingbirds)

Opisthocomiformes

Opisthocomiformes
Opisthocomiformes
(hoatzin)

Cursorimorphae

Charadriiformes
Charadriiformes
(gulls and relatives) Gruiformes
Gruiformes
(cranes and relatives)

Phaethontimorphae

Phaethontiformes (tropicbirds) Eurypygiformes
Eurypygiformes
(kagu and sunbittern)

Aequornithes

Gaviiformes (loons or divers) Sphenisciformes (penguins) Procellariiformes
Procellariiformes
(albatrosses and petrels) Ciconiiformes
Ciconiiformes
(storks) Suliformes
Suliformes
(cormorants and relatives) Pelecaniformes
Pelecaniformes
(pelicans and relatives)

Australaves

Cariamiformes
Cariamiformes
(seriemas and relatives) Falconiformes (falcons and relatives) Psittaciformes (parrots) Passeriformes
Passeriformes
(perching birds)

Afroaves

Cathartiformes
Cathartiformes
( New World
New World
vultures and condors) Accipitriformes
Accipitriformes
(eagles and hawks) Strigiformes (owls) Coliiformes (mousebirds) Trogoniformes (trogons and quetzals) Leptosomatiformes (cuckoo roller) Bucerotiformes
Bucerotiformes
(hornbills and hoopoes) Coraciiformes
Coraciiformes
(kingfishers and rollers) Piciformes
Piciformes
(woodpeckers and relatives)

Category Portal Outline

Taxon identifiers

Wd: Q484131 EoL: 7602 EPPO: 1CORCO Fauna Europaea: 10818 Fossilworks: 39368 GBIF: 1447 iNaturalist: 2114 ITIS: 178102 NCBI:

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