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Beach
Beach
soccer, also known as beach football or beasal, is a variant of association football played on a beach or some form of sand. The game emphasises skill, agility and accuracy in shooting at the goal.[1] Whilst football has been played informally on beaches for many years, the introduction of beach soccer was an attempt to codify rules for the game. This was done in 1992 by the founders of Beach
Beach
Soccer Worldwide, a company set up to develop the sport and responsible for the majority of its tournaments to this day. This was a major foundation for what is now known as beach soccer and what has led to the sport rapidly growing in popularity.[2] The irregularity of the soft-sand playing surface leads to a totally different style of play than is used in football, with a greater degree of improvisation. The compact field, much smaller than a normal football field, allows players to score from anywhere on the sand, leading to an average of sixty attempts at goal in a single game. With an average scoring rate of one goal every three or four minutes, around eleven goals are scored in total during an average game.[3]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Foundation 1.2 Growth 1.3 Recent years

2 Rules

2.1 Players 2.2 Match length 2.3 Referees and discipline 2.4 Field

3 Main beach soccer tournaments

3.1 International 3.2 PRO/Amateur International 3.3 Confederation

4 See also 5 References 6 External links

History[edit] See also: Beach
Beach
Soccer Worldwide Foundation[edit] Beach
Beach
football (beasal or futebol de areia) started in Brazil, more precisely at Rio de Janeiro. In 1950 the first official tournament was created to unite neighborhood small tourneys that happened since 1940.[4] After huge popularity it has grown to be an international game. The participation of internationally renowned players such as flamboyant Frenchman Eric Cantona, legendary Spanish strikers Michel and Julio Salinas
Julio Salinas
and Brazilian stars such as Romário, Júnior and Zico
Zico
has helped to expand television coverage to large audiences in over 170 countries worldwide. Beach
Beach
soccer had been played recreationally all over the world for many years and in many different formats. In 1992 the laws of the game were envisioned and a pilot event was staged by the founding partners of BSWW in Los Angeles. By 1993, the first professional beach soccer competition was organized at Miami Beach, with teams from the United States, Brazil, Argentina
Argentina
and Italy
Italy
taking part. Growth[edit]

A beach soccer game at the 2006 Chicago Beach
Beach
Soccer Invitational

In April 1994 the first event to be covered by network television transmissions was held on Copacabana Beach
Beach
in Rio de Janeiro, and the city hosted the first Beach
Beach
Soccer World Championship in 1995. The competition was won by the host nation, making Brazil
Brazil
the first-ever World Champions of Beach
Beach
Soccer. The success of the tournament saw commercial interest begin to match developments on the field, and growing demand for the sport around the world gave rise to the Pro Beach
Beach
Soccer Tour in 1996. The first Pro Beach
Beach
Soccer Tour included a total of 60 games in two years across South America, Europe, Asia
Asia
and the United States, attracting major names both on and off the field. Interest generated by the tour in Europe
Europe
led to the creation of the European Pro Beach Soccer League in 1998, providing a solid infrastructure that would increase the professionalism of the spectacle on all levels. The EPBSL, now known as the Euro BS League, brought promoters together from across the continent and satisfied the demands of the media, sponsors and fans. Only four years on from its creation, the successful first step in the building of a legitimate worldwide competition structure for the sport of pro beach soccer had been taken. Behind the scenes key developments were also taking place, with the Beach
Beach
Soccer Company relocating its headquarters to Europe, firstly to Monaco
Monaco
and then Barcelona, before becoming Pro Beach
Beach
Soccer, S.L. in April 2000. One year later they would join forces with Octagon Koch Tavares, who had continued to organise the World Championships and events in South America, to form a single entity known as Beach
Beach
Soccer Worldwide (BSWW), with the aim of unifying all major Pro Beach
Beach
Soccer tournaments in the world under the same structure and providing representation of the sport to major sponsors, the media and FIFA. The EPBSL was also flourishing, a nail-biting 2000 season was decided in the closing match of the final tournament when Spain
Spain
beat Portugal in an intense encounter. The Americas League also took shape, with teams entered from North and South America, whilst the Pro Beach Soccer Tour extended its horizons to the United Arab Emirates, Thailand, Mexico, Greece, Japan, Australia
Australia
and the United Kingdom. In August 2011, Olympic news outlet Around the Rings reported that beach soccer could be vying for inclusion in the 2016 Summer Olympics. FIFA
FIFA
President Sepp Blatter reportedly spoke recently with Rio 2016 president Carlos Nuzman about including beach soccer on the Olympic agenda. Recent years[edit] The next four years would see this growth consolidated by further progress both on and off the field, with the EPBSL emerging as the strongest pro beach soccer competition in the world. By 2004, some seventeen nations had entered teams, with this number expected to rise to over [5] stage events. Such interest has allowed BSWW to strike major sponsorship deals with international companies including McDonald's, Coca-Cola
Coca-Cola
and MasterCard, who stepped up their involvement in 2004 and are now title sponsors of the Euro BS League. Recognition has also come from FIFA, who have cited BSWW as the major entity behind the creation and growth of Beach
Beach
Soccer, forming a highly promising partnership that was in its full splendour seen in the 2005 world cup, held in Copacabana Beach, Brazil. France
France
won the first world cup and the next year Brazil won it at the same venue. The World Cup has continued to flourish with the first held outside Brazil
Brazil
in 2008, and future World Cups spreading as far out as Tahiti
Tahiti
in 2013 and Portugal
Portugal
in 2015[6] As of 2017, FIFA
FIFA
and the continental confederations do not host women's beach soccer tournaments. The Asian Beach
Beach
Games, European Games and South American Beach
Beach
Games also do not have women's beach soccer tournaments. Rules[edit]

A beach soccer ball

Players[edit] Each team consists of five players, including the goalkeeper and an unlimited number of substitutions, from a selection of three to five players. Throw-ins and kick-ins mean the pace and flow of the game are much faster than regular football. Shoes are not allowed; players must play in bare feet, although ankle guards are permitted. Goal kicks are taken by the goalkeeper using their hands to throw the ball.[7] Match length[edit] A game lasts thirty-six minutes, and is split up into three twelve-minute periods. Unlike association football, in professional matches the referee is not the sole arbiter of the end of a period. A separate timekeeping official controls the official game clock, which is stopped for stoppages in play, and typically counts down to zero, as in North American sports such as basketball and ice hockey. Every beach soccer match is won by one team, with the game going into three minutes of extra time, followed by a penalty shootout if the score is still on level terms after normal time. Unlike football, penalty kicks are decided by sudden death rules. Referees and discipline[edit] Four referees officiate the match, two on the field and one off, controlling the teams benches. The fourth referee is called timekeeper and is controlling the stopwatch on the side. Any fouls committed lead to a free kick on goal, which has to be taken by the player who was fouled, unless awarded for deliberate handling. As in football, yellow and red cards can be issued. However unlike in the main game, when a player receives a yellow card they must leave the field for two minutes and the team must play without that player for that duration of time. When a player receives a red card, they are dismissed from the game entirely. Unlike in 11-a-side football, the team can then bring on a substitute to replace the dismissed player after two minutes.[8] Field[edit]

A beach soccer pitch

A beach soccer field is considerably smaller than a regular football field. In international competition, the field is composed entirely of sand and is cleared of pebbles and seashells, along with any other objects which could injure a player. The field is rectangular in shape, and the touch line is longer than the goal line. The field dimensions are:

Length: 35–37 metres (38.3–40.5 yards) Width: 26–28 metres (28.4–30.6 yards)

The penalty area is within 9 m (9.8 yards) of the goals, and is marked by a yellow flag situated in touch. Two red flags opposite each other are at the center of the field to represent the half-way line. The goals are slightly smaller than their standard association football counterparts, being 2.2 metres (7 ft 3 in) from the ground to the bottom of the crossbar and 5.5 metres (18 ft) in width between the inside of each upright. Main beach soccer tournaments[edit] The following are main beach soccer competitions: International[edit]

Game at the FIFA
FIFA
Beach
Beach
Soccer World Cup 2006

FIFA
FIFA
Beach
Beach
Soccer World Cup Intercontinental Cup BSWW Mundialito Mundialito de Clubes Persian Beach
Beach
Soccer Cup

PRO/Amateur International[edit]

The Beach
Beach
Soccer Championships – Oceanside, California – USA North American Sand Soccer Championships – Virginia Beach, Virginia – USA

Confederation[edit] AFC (Asian Football
Football
Confederation):

AFC Beach
Beach
Soccer Championship

CAF (Confederation of African Football):

CAF Beach
Beach
Soccer Championship

CONCACAF
CONCACAF
(Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football):

CONCACAF
CONCACAF
Beach
Beach
Soccer Championship

CONMEBOL
CONMEBOL
(South American Football
Football
Confederation):

CONMEBOL
CONMEBOL
Beach
Beach
Soccer Championship

OFC (Oceania Football
Football
Confederation):

OFC Beach
Beach
Soccer Championship

UEFA
UEFA
(Union of European Football
Football
Associations):

Euro Beach
Beach
Soccer Cup Euro Beach
Beach
Soccer League UEFA
UEFA
Beach
Beach
Soccer Championship BSWW Euro Winners Cup

See also[edit]

Beach
Beach
handball Beach
Beach
rugby Beach
Beach
volleyball Footvolley Futsal Street football

References[edit]

^ "BBC – Manchester – Life's a beach in Tameside". BBC News. 2009-08-14. Retrieved 2012-10-03.  ^ Pickup, Oliver (2013-09-04). "Sand Aliens & Heel Flicks: Introducing The England Beach
Beach
Soccer Team". Sabotage Times. Retrieved 2014-05-14.  ^ Garry, Tom (2014-11-03). "Women's Beach
Beach
Soccer: Sun, sea, sand, bicycle kicks and a European Championship". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2016-07-31.  ^ "Projeto de Lei 2102/2016 - Clause 2102/2016". Câmara do Rio de Janeiro.  ^ twenty for the Euro BS League in 2005, contributing to vastly expanded television coverage of the series and unprecedented demand from promoters in more than seventy countries looking to ^ Borkakoty, Rituraj (November 21, 2013). " Beach
Beach
soccer is bigger than beach volleyball: Cusco". Khaleej Times.  ^ "BBC – The Guide: What's on in Somerset". BBC News. 2009-08-13. Retrieved 2012-10-03.  ^ " FIFA
FIFA
booklet – Beach
Beach
Soccer Laws of the Game (2006)" (PDF). Images.ussoccer.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2009-03-25. Retrieved 2012-10-03. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Beach
Beach
soccer.

Laws of the Game at FIFA Beach
Beach
Soccer Worldwide

v t e

International beach soccer

FIFA Beach
Beach
Soccer Worldwide (BSWW) World Cup Intercontinental Cup Mundialito (de Clubes) BSWW Tour World Rankings Stars Awards

Asia

AFC – Championship

Africa

CAF – Cup of Nations

North America Central America and Caribbean

CONCACAF
CONCACAF
– Championship

South America

CONMEBOL
CONMEBOL
– World Cup qualifiers Copa América U-20 League Club Copa Libertadores

Oceania

OFC – Championship

Europe

UEFA
UEFA
– League World Cup qualifiers Cup Club Winners Cup

Men's Women's

Games

Asian Beach
Beach
Games Bolivarian Beach
Beach
Games European Games Mediterranean Beach
Beach
Games South American Beach
Beach
Games

v t e

Team sports

Sport Governing bodies Sportspeople National sport

Basket sports

Basketball

beach deaf 3x3 water wheelchair

Cestoball Korfball Netball

Fast5 indoor wheelchair

Rezball Ringball Slamball

Football
Football
codes

Association football

amputee beach freestyle Futsal indoor Jorkyball paralympic powerchair roller street walking

Australian rules football

AFLX Lightning football Metro footy Nine-a-side Rec footy

Gaelic football

Ladies'

Circle rules football

Gridiron codes

American football

eight-man flag nine-man six-man sprint touch wheelchair

Canadian football Indoor American football

Arena football

Hybrid codes

Austus Eton wall game International rules football Samoa rules Speedball Swedish football Universal football Volata

Medieval football
Medieval football
codes

Ba game Caid Calcio fiorentino Camping Cnapan Cornish hurling Cuju Harpastum Kemari Ki-o-rahi Jegichagi La soule Lelo burti Marn grook Pasuckuakohowog Royal Shrovetide Uppies and downies Yubi lakpi

Rugby codes

Beach Rugby league

masters mod nines sevens tag wheelchair

Rugby union

American flag mini sevens snow tag touch tens

Touch Wheelchair

Bat-and-ball games

Baseball Brännboll British baseball Corkball Cricket

One Day Test Twenty20

Danish longball Indoor cricket Kickball Lapta Matball Oină Over-the-line Pesäpallo Rounders Softball

Fastpitch

Stickball Stoolball Town ball Vigoro Vitilla Wiffle ball Wireball

Stick and ball sports

Bando Cammag Hurling

Camogie Super11s Shinty–Hurling

Indigenous North American stickball Iomain Knattleikr Knotty Lacrosse

box/indoor field intercrosse women's

Ritinis Shinty

Shinty–Hurling

Hockey
Hockey
sports

Ball hockey Bandy

rink

Broomball

Moscow

Field hockey

indoor

Floor hockey Floorball Ice hockey

pond power ice sledge underwater

Ringette Rinkball Roller hockey

in-line quad

Rossall hockey Shinny Street hockey Underwater hockey Unicycle hockey

Polo
Polo
sports

Auto polo Cowboy polo Cycle polo Elephant polo Horseball Motoball Pato Polo

Arena polo chovgan snow polo

Polocrosse Segway polo Yak polo

Net sports

Ball badminton Beach
Beach
tennis Biribol Bossaball Fistball Footbag net Football
Football
tennis Footvolley Jianzi Jokgu Newcomb ball Peteca Sepak takraw Throwball Volleyball

beach paralympic

Other sports

Airsoft Angleball Balle à la main Ballon au poing Basque pelota

frontenis jai alai xare

Bo-taoshi Boules

Bocce Bocce
Bocce
volo Boccia Bowls Jeu provençal Pétanque Raffa

Buzkashi Combat (juggling) Curling

wheelchair

Cycle ball Digor Dodgeball Flickerball Gateball Goalball Guts Handball

beach Czech field

Hornussen Ice stock sport Jereed Kabaddi

indoor beach

Kho kho Kin-Ball Lagori Longue paume Makura-Nage Mesoamerican ballgame Paintball Pelota mixteca Prisonball Pushball Quidditch Rollball Roller derby Slahal Snow snake Synchronized skating Synchronized swimming Tamburello Tchoukball

beach

Tejo Tug of war Ulama Ultimate Underwater football Underwater rugby Valencian pilota

Llargues

Water polo

canoe inner tube beach

Waboba Whirlyball W

.