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Barry Sanders[1] (born July 16, 1968) is a former American football running back. He played professionally for the Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
of the National Football League
National Football League
(NFL). A Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl
invitee in each of his ten NFL seasons and two-time NFL Offensive Player of the Year, Sanders led the league in rushing yards four times and established himself as one of the most elusive runners in pro football with his quickness and agility. In 2007, he was ranked by NFL Network's NFL Top 10 series as the most elusive runner in NFL history,[2] and also topped its list of greatest players never to play in a Super Bowl.[3] Sanders played college football for the Oklahoma State Cowboys football team, where as a junior in 1988 he compiled what is considered one of the greatest individual seasons in college football history,[4] rushing for 2,850 yards and 42 touchdowns in 12 games. He was awarded the Heisman Trophy as the most outstanding college player in the nation and was unanimously recognized as an All-American. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
in 2003. Sanders joined the Lions in 1989 and had an immediate impact, winning the NFL's Rookie of the Year award. Through ten seasons in Detroit, he averaged over 1,500 rushing yards per season and just under 100 rushing yards per game. In 1997, he became the third player to rush for over 2,000 yards in a season and was named the NFL Most Valuable Player. Still seemingly in his prime, Sanders unexpectedly retired from football after the 1998 season, 1,457 yards short of breaking the NFL's all-time rushing record. His number 20 jersey was retired by the Lions, and he was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
in 2004.

Contents

1 Early years 2 College career

2.1 1988 game logs 2.2 College statistics 2.3 NCAA FBS records

3 Professional career

3.1 Retirement

4 NFL career statistics 5 NFL records 6 Personal life 7 After football 8 See also 9 Notes and references 10 External links

Early years[edit] Born in Wichita, Kansas, Sanders attended Wichita North High School.[5] Sanders started at tailback his sophomore year, but his brother Byron started before him in that position the following year. Sanders did not become the starting running back until the fourth game of his senior year. He rushed for 1,417 yards in the final seven games of the season, which earned him all-state honors. During that seven-game span, Sanders averaged 10.2 yards per carry, but he was overlooked by most college recruiters. Although he was a stellar athlete, Sanders received scholarship offers from only Emporia State University, University of Tulsa, and Oklahoma State University-Stillwater.[6] College career[edit] Enrolling at Oklahoma State University, Sanders played for the Oklahoma State Cowboys from 1986 to 1988, and wore the No. 21. During his first two years, he backed up All-American Thurman Thomas. In 1987, he led the nation in yards per kickoff return (31.6), while also rushing for over 600 yards and scoring 8 touchdowns. Thomas moved on to the NFL, and Sanders became the starter for his junior year. In 1988, in what is considered one of the greatest individual seasons in college football history,[4][7] Sanders led the nation by averaging 7.6 yards per carry and over 200 yards per game, including rushing for over 300 yards in four games. Despite his massive workload of 344 carries, Sanders was still used as the team's punt and kickoff returner, adding another 516 yards on special teams. He set college football season records with 2,628 yards rushing, 3,248 total yards, 234 points, 39 touchdowns, 37 rushing touchdowns, 5 consecutive 200 yard games, scored at least 2 touchdowns in 11 consecutive games, and 9 times he scored at least 3 touchdowns. Sanders also ran for 222 yards and scored 5 touchdowns in his three quarters of action in the 1988 Holiday Bowl, a game that is not included in the official NCAA season statistics.[8] Sanders learned of his Heisman Trophy win while he was with the team in Tokyo, Japan
Tokyo, Japan
preparing to face Texas Tech in the Coca-Cola Classic.[9] He chose to leave Oklahoma State before his senior season to enter the NFL draft. 1988 game logs[edit]

Sanders' 1988 game-by-game rushing stats[10]

G Opponent Att Yds Avg TD

1 Miami (OH) 18 178 9.9 2

2 Texas A&M 20 157 7.9 2

3 Tulsa 33 304 9.2 5

4 Colorado 24 174 7.3 4

5 Nebraska 35 189 5.4 4

6 Missouri 25 154 6.2 2

7 Kansas State 37 320 8.6 3

8 Oklahoma 39 215 5.5 2

9 Kansas 37 312 8.4 5

10 Iowa State 32 293 9.2 4

11 Texas Tech 44 332 7.5 4

12 Wyoming 29 222 7.7 5

Totals 373 2,850 7.6 42

College statistics[edit]

  Rushing Receiving

Season Team GP Att Yds Avg Yds/G TD Rec Yds Long TD

1986 OSU

74 325 4.4 — 2 0 0 0 0

1987* OSU

111 622 5.6 — 8 4 59

1

1988* OSU 12 373 2,850 7.6 237.5 42* 19 106 — 2

Total — 558 3,797 5.9 — 52* 23 165 — 3

*Includes bowl game. The NCAA does not include bowl games in official statistics for seasons prior to 2002.

Source: Barry Sanders at Sports Reference

NCAA FBS records[edit] Sanders set 34 NCAA Division I FBS records in his college career, and still holds the following records:[11][12]

Most rushing yards in a season: 2,628 Most rushing touchdowns in a season: 37 Most touchdowns in a season: 39 (tied with Montee Ball) Most games rushing for 300+ yards in a season and career: 4 Highest average rushing yards per game in a season: 238.9 Most points scored in a season: 234

Professional career[edit] The Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
selected Sanders with the 3rd overall pick in the 1989 Draft,[5] thanks to the endorsement of then-coach Wayne Fontes. The Lions' management considered drafting another Sanders, cornerback Deion Sanders, but Fontes convinced them to draft Barry instead. He was offered No. 20, which had been worn by former Lions greats Lem Barney and Billy Sims; Sims was one of the league's best running backs in the early 1980s, and Fontes had requested Sanders to wear the number in tribute to Sims.[13] Though there were concerns about his size, it turned out these concerns were unfounded. Sanders was far too quick for defenders to hit solidly on a consistent basis, and too strong to bring down with arm tackles. Though short at 5'8", his playing weight was 203 lb (91 kg) – the same as Walter Payton, and only slightly under the NFL average for a running back. Furthermore, Sanders had unusual explosiveness, demonstrated by his ability to be competitive in the 1991 Footlocker slam dunk contest despite his short stature.[14] In 1989, Sanders missed his rookie year training camp due to a contract dispute. He ran for eighteen yards his first carry during the regular season,[5] and scored a touchdown on his fourth. He finished the season second in the NFL in rushing yards and touchdowns after declining to go back into the regular season finale just 10 yards shy of the rushing title (later won by Christian Okoye), and won the Rookie of the Year Award.[15] Sanders was the featured running back on the Lion teams that made the playoffs five times during the 1990s (1991, 1993, 1994, 1995, and 1997). He was a member of the 1991 and 1993 squads that won the NFC Central division title; the 1991 team won 12 regular season games (a franchise record). In 1994, Sanders rushed for 1,883 yards, on a 5.7 yards per carry average. He also totaled 283 receiving yards, which gave him a combined 2,166 yards from scrimmage for the season. In Week 11, a 14–9 win over the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, he broke the NFL record for most rushing yards in a single game without scoring a touchdown with 237.[16][17] He was named the NFL's Offensive Player of the Year. In 1995, Sanders posted 1,500 yards rushing with 398 receiving yards, beating his rushing total alone of the '94 season. In 1996, Sanders rushed for 1,553 yards with a career-low 147 receiving yards. Sanders' greatest season came in 1997 when he became a member of the 2,000 rushing yards club. After a start in which he gained 53 yards on 25 carries in the first two games of the season (though he passed Eric Dickerson
Eric Dickerson
as the active leader in career rushing yards), Sanders ran for an NFL record 14 consecutive 100 yard games, including two 200 yard performances, en route to rushing for 2,053 yards. In reaching the 2,000 yard plateau, he became only the third player to do so in a single season and the first since O. J. Simpson
O. J. Simpson
to rush for 2,000 yards in a span of 14 consecutive games. He was the first running back to rush for 1,500 yards in five seasons and the only one to do it four consecutive years. At the end of the season, Sanders shared the Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player Award with Green Bay Packers
Green Bay Packers
quarterback Brett Favre. In Sanders' last season in the NFL, 1998, he rushed for 1,491 yards, ending his four-year streak of rushing for over 1,500 yards in a season. Despite his individual success, the Lions never reached the Super Bowl while Sanders was with the team.[5] The closest they came was in the 1991 season.[5] Aided by Sanders' 1,855 combined rushing/receiving yards and 17 touchdowns during the season, they recorded a 12–4 record and went on to defeat the Dallas Cowboys
Dallas Cowboys
38–6 in the divisional playoffs, which still stands as Detroit's only playoff victory since defeating the Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
to win the 1957 NFL Championship. The Lions lost to the Washington Redskins
Washington Redskins
41–10 in the NFC Championship Game, and Sanders was held to 59 total yards in the game. In Sanders' career, he achieved Pro Bowl
Pro Bowl
status in all of his 10 seasons.[5] Sanders was named first team All-Pro six times from 1989–1991 and 1993, 1994 and 1997. He was also named second team All-Pro four times in 1992, 1993, 1996 and 1998. Sanders was also named All-NFC from 1989–92 and 1994–97. Sanders was named Offensive Player of the Year
Offensive Player of the Year
in '94 and '97, NFL MVP
NFL MVP
in '97, and was named to the 1990s NFL All-Decade team. In contrast to many of the star players of his era, Sanders was also noted[18] for his on-field humility. Despite his flashy playing style, Sanders was rarely seen celebrating after the whistle was blown. Instead, he handed the ball to a referee or congratulated his teammates. Retirement[edit] On July 27, 1999, Sanders announced he was retiring from pro football. His retirement was made public by faxing a letter to the Wichita Eagle, his hometown newspaper.[19] He left football healthy, having gained 15,269 rushing yards (the highest total rushing yards ever by any NFL player in a 10-year span), 2,921 receiving yards, and 109 touchdowns (99 rushing and 10 receiving). He retired within striking distance of Walter Payton's career rushing mark of 16,726 yards. Only Payton and Emmitt Smith
Emmitt Smith
have rushed for more yards than Sanders. Sanders' retirement came somewhat unexpectedly and was a matter of controversy. Two years earlier, Sanders had renewed his contract with the Lions for $34.56 million over six years with an $11 million signing bonus. The Lions demanded that he return $5.5 million of the bonus. Sanders refused, and the Lions sued. On February 15, 2000, an arbitrator ruled that Sanders had to immediately repay $1.833 million (a sixth of the bonus), with the remaining bonus to be repaid over each of the three years Sanders had left on the contract provided he stayed retired. Before the ruling, Sanders offered to pay back the entire $5.5 million in return for his release from the team. The Lions refused, stating they would welcome Sanders back to the team; otherwise, they would honor his announced retirement. Sanders' agent Lamont Smith lobbied the team to trade his client. However, it had been a long-standing practice for the Lions to not accommodate players' requests for trades, and other teams were reluctant to discuss Sanders while he was still under contract.[20] It was thought by some that Lions head coach Bobby Ross
Bobby Ross
himself may have actually been the reason for his early retirement, but in his autobiography Barry Sanders: Now You See Him, Sanders stated that Ross had nothing to do with his retirement and praised him as a head coach.[21] NFL career statistics[edit]

Legend

Led the league

NFL MVP
NFL MVP
& Offensive Player of the Year

NFL Offensive Player of the Year

Bold Career high

NFL statistics

Season Rushing Receiving Fumbles

Year Team G Att Yards Avg Lng TD FD Rec Yards Avg Lng TD FD Fum Lost

1989 DET 15 280 1,470 5.3 34 14 0 24 282 11.8 46 0 0 10 0

1990 DET 16 255 1,304 5.1 45 13 0 36 480 13.3 47 3 0 4 2

1991 DET 15 342 1,548 4.5 69 16 91 41 307 7.5 34 1 18 5 1

1992 DET 16 312 1,352 4.3 55 9 68 29 225 7.8 48 1 7 6 2

1993 DET 11 243 1,115 4.6 42 3 46 36 205 5.7 17 0 6 4 3

1994 DET 16 331 1,883 5.7 85 7 72 44 283 6.4 22 1 16 0 0

1995 DET 16 314 1,500 4.8 75 11 70 48 398 8.3 40 1 18 4 2

1996 DET 16 307 1,553 5.1 54 11 79 24 147 6.1 28 0 5 4 2

1997 DET 16 335 2,053 6.1 82 11 85 33 305 9.2 66 3 11 4 2

1998 DET 16 343 1,491 4.3 73 4 63 37 289 7.8 44 0 10 3 1

Career 153 3,062 15,269 5.0 85 99 574 352 2,921 8.3 66 10 91 44 15

NFL records[edit]

Most Seasons, 1,100 or More Yards Rushing (10) tied with Walter Payton Most Consecutive Seasons, 1,100 or More Yards Rushing (10) Most Seasons, 1,300 or More Yards Rushing (9) tied with Walter Payton Most Seasons, 1,400 or More Yards Rushing (7) Most Consecutive Seasons, 1,400 or More Yards Rushing (5) tied with Emmitt Smith, 1991–1995 Most Seasons,1,500 or More Yards Rushing (5) Most Consecutive Seasons, 1,500 or More Yards Rushing (4) In 1997, he set an NFL record by rushing for at least 100 yards in 14 consecutive games and became only the third player to reach 2,000 yards in a single season. He shared the NFL MVP
NFL MVP
award with Brett Favre. During the final 14 games of the 1997 season Sanders rushed for exactly 2000 yards on 310 carries (6.5 yd./carry), a figure which bears comparison with O.J. Simpson's 14-game mark of 2003 yards on 332 carries (6.0 yd./carry). Each of his 10 years from 1989 through 1998 he was first- or second-team All-Pro and selected to the Pro Bowl. Over his professional football career, he rushed for at least 100 yards in 76 games, just short of Walter Payton's 77 games and Emmitt Smith's 78 games. NFL record 25 games in which Sanders rushed for 150 yards or more. Jim Brown is second with 22 games. NFL record 46 games in which Sanders had 150 yards from scrimmage or more. Walter Payton
Walter Payton
is second with 45. 15 career touchdown runs of 50 yards or more, most in NFL history. Jim Brown is second with 12. At the time of his retirement, Sanders' 15,269 career rushing yards placed him second behind Walter Payton's 16,726 yards. At Sanders' then-current yearly yardage pace, he would have eclipsed Payton within one or two years. Payton died from liver cancer at age 45 just months after Sanders' sudden retirement. His 18,190 career yards from scrimmage place him sixth on the all-time list. His career average of 5.0 yards per rushing attempt (min. 1500 att) is second all-time for running backs. Jim Brown
Jim Brown
is first with a 5.2 career average. His career rushing yards per game average of 99.8 yards is second in NFL history behind only Jim Brown's 104.3 yards per game. In 1999, he was ranked number 12 on The Sporting News' list of the 100 Greatest Football Players, making him the highest-ranking Lions player and the third highest ranked running back, behind Jim Brown
Jim Brown
and Walter Payton. On January 31, 2004, he was elected into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. On August 8, 2004, he was inducted to the Hall of Fame along with Bob Brown, Carl Eller, and John Elway. Sanders also holds the NFL record for the most carries for negative yardage. According to the NFL, Sanders is the all-time leader in rushing yards lost by a running back with 1,114.[22]

Personal life[edit] Sanders has four sons. The youngest three of his sons are with his ex-wife, Lauren Campbell Sanders: Nigel, Nicholas, and Noah.[23] A publication notes that he is deeply but quietly religious (Christian).[24] Sanders filed for divorce from his wife Lauren Sanders, a former news anchor for WDIV
WDIV
in Detroit,[25] in February 2012 after 12 years of marriage.[26] Sanders' son, Barry J. Sanders, played running back for Stanford University from 2012 to 2015[27] after a highly successful high school career: as a freshman in 2008, Barry ran for 742 yards and twelve touchdowns while helping Heritage Hall School to the 2008 Oklahoma 2A state title,[28][29] and he was the only sophomore on the 2009 Tulsa World all-state team.[30] After football[edit] Sanders introduced ESPN's Monday Night Football
Monday Night Football
game between the Chicago Bears
Chicago Bears
and Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
on October 10, 2011.[31] In April 2013, Sanders made it to the finals in the EA Sports
EA Sports
Madden NFL 25 cover vote by beating Ron Rivera
Ron Rivera
in Round One, Marcus Allen
Marcus Allen
in Round Two, Ray Lewis
Ray Lewis
in Round Three, Joe Montana
Joe Montana
in the quarter-finals, and Jerry Rice
Jerry Rice
in the semi-finals. He then went on to beat Adrian Peterson
Adrian Peterson
to become the next cover athlete,[32] the 1st player to appear on the cover of Madden NFL
Madden NFL
Football more than once (he appeared in the background of the Madden NFL
Madden NFL
2000 cover).[33] See also[edit]

List of National Football League
National Football League
rushing yards leaders List of National Football League
National Football League
rushing champions List of NCAA major college football yearly rushing leaders List of NCAA major college football yearly scoring leaders

Notes and references[edit]

Notes

^ Sanders, Barry (23 November 2011). "@BarrySanders". Twitter. Retrieved September 9, 2013. When the truth is — I have no middle name. Thus making my son, Barry James Sanders, not a Barry "junior".  ^ NFL Network
NFL Network
(May 28, 2008). "Top 10 most elusive runners in NFL history". NFL.com. National Football League. Retrieved September 9, 2013.  ^ "Some all-time great players never even reached Super Bowl". NFL.com. National Football League. January 30, 2012. Retrieved September 9, 2013.  ^ a b Merron, Jeff. "Best individual college football seasons". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 14, 2017. The only serious question when composing this list was 'Who's No. 2?'  ^ a b c d e f " Barry Sanders Career Biography and Statistics". SportHaven.com. Demand Media, Inc. 2009. Archived from the original on 8 December 2009. Retrieved September 9, 2013.  ^ Sanders, Barry; McCormick, Mark E (2003). Now you see him... his story in his own words. Introduction by John Madden. Indianapolis: B. Sanders, Inc., in conjunction with Emmis Books. ISBN 1578601398. OCLC 53833879.  ^ Maisel, Ivan (August 3, 2014). "Great seasons are not created equal". ESPN.com. Retrieved July 14, 2017.  ^ " 1988 Holiday Bowl Summary". Archived from the original on 21 December 2007. Retrieved 2007-12-29.  ^ Trotter, Jake (August 8, 2014). "Sanders' 1988 season stands alone". ESPN. Retrieved August 8, 2014.  ^ "Barry Sanders' 1988 game-by-game rushing stats". SportsRatings. December 10, 2007. Retrieved November 30, 2017.  ^ Huston, Chris (November 30, 2012). "This Week in Heisman History: Barry Sanders caps record season in Tokyo". CBS Sports. Retrieved November 30, 2017.  ^ Richards, Casey (November 29, 2011). "Sanders shattered records in 1988". NCAA.com. Retrieved November 30, 2017.  ^ Rank, Adam (February 12, 2014). "Throwback Thursday - Wish you could've stayed". National Football League. Retrieved February 27, 2014.  ^ " Barry Sanders vs. Mike Powell dunk contest Foot Locker 1991 dunking slam fest". YouTube. Retrieved 30 July 2015.  ^ Merron, Jeff (September 2003). "LT best NFL rookie of all time". ESPN. Archived from the original on 16 August 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-12.  ^ "Tampa Bay Buccaneers at Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
- November 13th, 1994". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2018-02-25.  ^ "Player Game Finder Query Results". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved 2018-02-25.  ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20091208015848/http://www.sporthaven.com/players/barry-sanders ^ [ "The Cheap Seats: Finally, Sanders Speaks"] "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 16, 2007. Retrieved 2008-03-23. , 3 December 2003 ^ "Arbitrator finds Sanders must pay back $1.83 million". sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Detroit. Associated Press. 15 February 2000. Archived from the original on 3 December 2013. Retrieved 30 July 2015.  ^ Pasche, Paula (2012). "39". 100 Things Lions Fans Should Know & Do Before They Die. Triumph. Retrieved 2016-03-18.  ^ "TDIF: Sanders Joins Payton in Record Books". NFL.com. 26 November 2012. Retrieved 30 July 2015.  ^ "In Residence: Lauren Sanders - Detroit Home - Winter 2010 - Detroit, MI". Detroithomemag.com. Retrieved 2014-01-15.  ^ http://www.motownsports.com/forums/topic/8338-good-article-on-barry-sanders/ ^ "Lauren Sanders Meet The Local 4 News Team". Clickondetroit.com. 2014-01-10. Archived from the original on 2013-12-20. Retrieved 2014-01-15.  ^ File
File
photos (2012-02-27). "Ex-Lion Barry Sanders files for divorce from WDIV
WDIV
weekend anchor Lauren Campbell". MLive.com. Retrieved 2014-01-15.  ^ "ESPU 150's Barry J. Sanders commits to Stanford Cardinal - ESPN". Espn.go.com. 2012-01-07. Retrieved 2014-01-15.  ^ Fedotin, Jeff (2009-09-09). "Barry Sanders'son looks like future star". Okvarsity.rivals.com. Archived from the original on 2013-11-09. Retrieved 2014-01-15.  ^ video clips of Barry Sanders' son ^ Baker, Matt. "In his father's image: Barry James Sanders is familiar, but for more than his name", Tulsa World, August 30, 2010. ^ " Barry Sanders to open MNF sans song". UPI.com. October 8, 2011. Retrieved 2011-10-08.  ^ "Vote for EA Sports' ' Madden NFL
Madden NFL
25' Cover Athlete - SportsNation #MaddenCoverVote - ESPN". Espn.go.com. Retrieved 2014-01-15.  ^ " Barry Sanders wins Madden vote". ESPN. April 25, 2013. Archived from the original on June 11, 2013. Retrieved June 10, 2013. 

General references

Ron Knapp Sports Great Barry Sanders Revised Edition copyright date 1999 page 16. Gil Brandt. "Hall recall: Barry Sanders", NFL.com, July 22, 2004. Craig Ellenport. "Sanders was born to run", NFL.com, August 8, 2004. Mark McCormick and Barry Sanderss. Barry Sanders: Now you See Him: His Story in His Own Words (Emmis Books, 2003). ISBN 1-57860-139-8 Sam Mellinger. "A Hard Man to Catch", The Kansas City Star, August 8, 2004, pp. C1, C8.

External links[edit]

Official website Barry Sanders at the Pro Football Hall of Fame Barry Sanders at the College Football Hall of Fame Barry Sanders at the Heisman Trophy official website

Career statistics and player information from NFL.com • Pro-Football-Reference • Databasefootball.com

Barry Sanders—awards and honors

v t e

1988 College Football All-America Team
College Football All-America Team
consensus selections

Offense

QB Steve Walsh & Troy Aikman RB Barry Sanders RB Anthony Thompson RB Tim Worley WR Jason Phillips WR Hart Lee Dykes TE Marv Cook

OL Tony Mandarich OL Anthony Phillips OL Mike Utley OL Mark Stepnoski C Jake Young C John Vitale

Defense

DL Mark Messner DL Tracy Rocker DL Wayne Martin DL Frank Stams DL Bill Hawkins

LB Derrick Thomas LB Broderick Thomas LB Mike Stonebreaker

DB Deion Sanders DB Donnell Woolford DB Louis Oliver DB Darryl Henley

Special
Special
teams

PK Kendall Trainor P Keith English

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Heisman Trophy winners

1935: Berwanger 1936: Kelley 1937: Frank 1938: O'Brien 1939: Kinnick 1940: Harmon 1941: B. Smith 1942: Sinkwich 1943: Bertelli 1944: Horvath 1945: Blanchard 1946: G. Davis 1947: Lujack 1948: D. Walker 1949: Hart 1950: Janowicz 1951: Kazmaier 1952: Vessels 1953: Lattner 1954: Ameche 1955: Cassady 1956: Hornung 1957: Crow 1958: Dawkins 1959: Cannon 1960: Bellino 1961: E. Davis 1962: Baker 1963: Staubach 1964: Huarte 1965: Garrett 1966: Spurrier 1967: Beban 1968: Simpson 1969: Owens 1970: Plunkett 1971: Sullivan 1972: Rodgers 1973: Cappelletti 1974: Griffin 1975: Griffin 1976: Dorsett 1977: Campbell 1978: Sims 1979: C. White 1980: Rogers 1981: Allen 1982: H. Walker 1983: Rozier 1984: Flutie 1985: B. Jackson 1986: Testaverde 1987: Brown 1988: Sanders 1989: Ware 1990: Detmer 1991: Howard 1992: Torretta 1993: Ward 1994: Salaam 1995: George 1996: Wuerffel 1997: Woodson 1998: Williams 1999: Dayne 2000: Weinke 2001: Crouch 2002: Palmer 2003: J. White 2004: Leinart 2005: vacated * 2006: T. Smith 2007: Tebow 2008: Bradford 2009: Ingram Jr. 2010: Newton 2011: Griffin III 2012: Manziel 2013: Winston 2014: Mariota 2015: Henry 2016: L. Jackson 2017: Mayfield

*Note: The 2005 Heisman Trophy was originally awarded to Reggie Bush, but Bush forfeited the award in 2010. The Heisman Trust subsequently decided to leave the 2005 award vacated.

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Maxwell Award winners

1937: Frank 1938: O'Brien 1939: Kinnick 1940: Harmon 1941: Dudley 1942: Governali 1943: Odell 1944: G. Davis 1945: Blanchard 1946: Trippi 1947: D. Walker 1948: Bednarik 1949: Hart 1950: Bagnell 1951: Kazmaier 1952: Lattner 1953: Lattner 1954: Beagle 1955: Cassady 1956: McDonald 1957: Reifsnyder 1958: Dawkins 1959: Lucas 1960: Bellino 1961: Ferguson 1962: Baker 1963: Staubach 1964: Ressler 1965: Nobis 1966: Lynch 1967: Beban 1968: Simpson 1969: Reid 1970: Plunkett 1971: Marinaro 1972: Van Pelt 1973: Cappelletti 1974: Joachim 1975: Griffin 1976: Dorsett 1977: Browner 1978: Fusina 1979: C. White 1980: Green 1981: Allen 1982: H. Walker 1983: Rozier 1984: Flutie 1985: Long 1986: Testaverde 1987: McPherson 1988: Sanders 1989: Thompson 1990: Detmer 1991: Howard 1992: Torretta 1993: Ward 1994: Collins 1995: George 1996: Wuerffel 1997: P. Manning 1998: Williams 1999: Dayne 2000: Brees 2001: Dorsey 2002: Johnson 2003: E. Manning 2004: J. White 2005: Young 2006: Quinn 2007: Tebow 2008: Tebow 2009: McCoy 2010: Newton 2011: Luck 2012: Te'o 2013: McCarron 2014: Mariota 2015: Henry 2016: Jackson 2017: Mayfield

v t e

Walter Camp Award winners

1967: Simpson 1968: Simpson 1969: Owens 1970: Plunkett 1971: Sullivan 1972: Rodgers 1973: Cappelletti 1974: Griffin 1975: Griffin 1976: Dorsett 1977: MacAfee 1978: Sims 1979: White 1980: Green 1981: Allen 1982: Walker 1983: Rozier 1984: Flutie 1985: B. Jackson 1986: Testaverde 1987: Brown 1988: Sanders 1989: Thompson 1990: Ismail 1991: Howard 1992: Torretta 1993: Ward 1994: Salaam 1995: George 1996: Wuerffel 1997: Woodson 1998: Williams 1999: Dayne 2000: Heupel 2001: Crouch 2002: Johnson 2003: Fitzgerald 2004: Leinart 2005: Bush 2006: Smith 2007: McFadden 2008: McCoy 2009: McCoy 2010: Newton 2011: Luck 2012: Te'o 2013: Winston 2014: Mariota 2015: Henry 2016: L. Jackson 2017: Mayfield

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Sporting News College Football Player of the Year winners

1942: Sinkwich 1943: Bertelli 1944: Horvath 1945: Blanchard 1946: G. Davis 1947: Lujack 1948: D. Walker 1949: Hart 1950: Janowicz 1951: Kazmaier 1952: Vessels 1953: Lattner 1954: Cassady 1955: Cassady 1956: McDonald 1957: Crow 1958: Cannon 1959: Cannon 1960: Bellino 1961: Ferguson 1962: Baker 1963: Staubach 1964: Butkus 1965: Anderson & Grabowski 1966: Spurrier 1967: Beban 1968: Simpson 1969: Owens 1970: Plunkett 1971: Sullivan & Marinaro 1972: B. Jones 1973: Hicks 1974: Griffin 1975: Griffin 1976: Dorsett 1977: Campbell 1978: Sims 1979: C. White 1980: Green 1981: Allen 1982: H. Walker 1983: Rozier 1984: Flutie 1985: B. Jackson 1986: Testaverde 1987: Brown 1988: Sanders 1989: Hagen 1990: Ismail 1991: Howard 1992: M. Jones 1993: Ward 1994: Salaam 1995: Frazier 1996: Wuerffel 1997: Woodson 1998: Williams 1999: Dayne 2000: Weinke 2001: Crouch 2002: Palmer 2003: J. White 2004: A. Smith 2005: Bush 2006: T. Smith 2007: Tebow 2008: Harrell, Bradford & McCoy 2009: Ingram Jr. 2010: Newton 2011: Griffin III 2012: Manziel 2013: Winston 2014: Mariota 2015: Mayfield 2016: L. Jackson 2017: Mayfield

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1989 NFL draft first-round selections

Troy Aikman Tony Mandarich Barry Sanders Derrick Thomas Deion Sanders Broderick Thomas Tim Worley Burt Grossman Sammie Smith Eric Hill Donnell Woolford Trace Armstrong Eric Metcalf Jeff Lageman Andy Heck Hart Lee Dykes Joe Wolf Brian Williams Wayne Martin Steve Atwater Bill Hawkins Andre Rison David Williams Tom Ricketts Louis Oliver Cleveland Gary Shawn Collins Keith DeLong

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Detroit Lions
Detroit Lions
first-round draft picks

Wagner Cardwell Wojciechowicz Pingel Nave Thomason Westfall Sinkwich Graham Szymanski Dellastatious G. Davis Tittle Rauch Hart Watson Sewell Chapman Middleton Cassady Glass Karras Pietrosante Robinson Hadl D. Sanders Beathard Nowatzke Farr Landry McCullouch Owens Bell Orvis Price O'Neil Boden Hunter Gaines Bradley Dorney B. Sims Nichols J. Williams J. Jones Lewis L. Brown Long R. Rogers Blades B. Sanders Ware Moore Porcher Morton Elliss R. Brown Hartings Westbrook Fair Claiborne Gibson McDougle Backus Harrington C. Rogers R. Williams K. Jones M. Williams E. Sims Johnson Cherilus Stafford Pettigrew Suh Best Fairley Reiff Ansah Ebron Tomlinson Decker J. Davis

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Associated Press NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year Award winners

1967: Farr 1968: McCullouch 1969: Hill 1970: Shaw 1971: Brockington 1972: Harris 1973: Foreman 1974: Woods 1975: M. Thomas 1976: White 1977: Dorsett 1978: Campbell 1979: O. Anderson 1980: Sims 1981: Rogers 1982: Allen 1983: Dickerson 1984: Lipps 1985: Brown 1986: Mayes 1987: Stradford 1988: Stephens 1989: Sanders 1990: Smith 1991: Russell 1992: Pickens 1993: Bettis 1994: Faulk 1995: Martin 1996: George 1997: Dunn 1998: Moss 1999: James 2000: M. Anderson 2001: A. Thomas 2002: Portis 2003: Boldin 2004: Roethlisberger 2005: Williams 2006: Young 2007: Peterson 2008: Ryan 2009: Harvin 2010: Bradford 2011: Newton 2012: Griffin III 2013: Lacy 2014: Beckham, Jr. 2015: Gurley 2016: Prescott 2017: Kamara

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Associated Press NFL Offensive Player of the Year
NFL Offensive Player of the Year
Award winners

1972: Brown 1973: Simpson 1974: Stabler 1975: Tarkenton 1976: Jones 1977: Payton 1978: Campbell 1979: Campbell 1980: Campbell 1981: Anderson 1982: Fouts 1983: Theismann 1984: Marino 1985: Allen 1986: Dickerson 1987: Rice 1988: Craig 1989: Montana 1990: Moon 1991: Thomas 1992: Young 1993: Rice 1994: Sanders 1995: Favre 1996: Davis 1997: Sanders 1998: Davis 1999: Faulk 2000: Faulk 2001: Faulk 2002: Holmes 2003: Lewis 2004: Manning 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Brady 2008: Brees 2009: Johnson 2010: Brady 2011: Brees 2012: Peterson 2013: Manning 2014: Murray 2015: Newton 2016: Ryan 2017: Gurley

v t e

Associated Press NFL Most Valuable Player
NFL Most Valuable Player
Award winners

1957: J. Brown 1958: J. Brown 1959: Unitas 1960: Van Brocklin 1961: Hornung 1962: J. Taylor 1963: Tittle 1964: Unitas 1965: J. Brown 1966: Starr 1967: Unitas 1968: Morrall 1969: Gabriel 1970: Brodie 1971: Page 1972: L. Brown 1973: Simpson 1974: Stabler 1975: Tarkenton 1976: Jones 1977: Payton 1978: Bradshaw 1979: Campbell 1980: Sipe 1981: Anderson 1982: Moseley 1983: Theismann 1984: Marino 1985: Allen 1986: L. Taylor 1987: Elway 1988: Esiason 1989: Montana 1990: Montana 1991: Thomas 1992: Young 1993: Smith 1994: Young 1995: Favre 1996: Favre 1997: Favre & Sanders 1998: Davis 1999: Warner 2000: Faulk 2001: Warner 2002: Gannon 2003: Manning & McNair 2004: Manning 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Brady 2008: Manning 2009: Manning 2010: Brady 2011: Rodgers 2012: Peterson 2013: Manning 2014: Rodgers 2015: Newton 2016: Ryan 2017: Brady

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Bert Bell Award winners

1959: Unitas 1960: Van Brocklin 1961: Hornung 1962: Robustelli 1963: J. Brown 1964: Unitas 1965: Retzlaff 1966: Meredith 1967: Unitas 1968: Kelly 1969: Gabriel 1970: Blanda 1971: Staubach 1972: L. Brown 1973: Simpson 1974: Olsen 1975: Tarkenton 1976: Stabler 1977: Griese 1978: Bradshaw 1979: Campbell 1980: Jaworski 1981: Anderson 1982: Theismann 1983: Riggins 1984: Marino 1985: Payton 1986: Taylor 1987: Rice 1988: Cunningham 1989: Montana 1990: Cunningham 1991: Sanders 1992: Young 1993: Smith 1994: Young 1995: Favre 1996: Favre 1997: Sanders 1998: Cunningham 1999: Warner 2000: Gannon 2001: Faulk 2002: Gannon 2003: Manning 2004: Manning 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Brady 2008: Peterson 2009: Brees 2010: Vick 2011: Rodgers 2012: Peterson 2013: Manning 2014: Watt 2015: Newton 2016: Ryan 2017: Wentz

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NFL annual rushing yards leaders

1932: Battles 1933: Musick 1934: Feathers 1935: Russell 1936: Leemans 1937: Battles 1938: B. White 1939: Osmanski 1940: B. White 1941: Manders 1942: Dudley 1943: Paschal 1944: Paschal 1945: Van Buren 1946: Dudley 1947: Van Buren 1948: Van Buren 1949: Van Buren 1950: Motley 1951: Price 1952: Towler 1953: Perry 1954: Perry 1955: Ameche 1956: Casares 1957: J. Brown 1958: J. Brown 1959: J. Brown 1960: J. Brown 1961: J. Brown 1962: Taylor 1963: J. Brown 1964: J. Brown 1965: J. Brown 1966: Sayers 1967: Kelly 1968: Kelly 1969: Sayers 1970: L. Brown 1971: Little 1972: Simpson 1973: Simpson 1974: Armstrong 1975: Simpson 1976: Simpson 1977: Payton 1978: Campbell 1979: Campbell 1980: Campbell 1981: Rogers 1982: McNeil 1983: Dickerson 1984: Dickerson 1985: Allen 1986: Dickerson 1987: C. White 1988: Dickerson 1989: Okoye 1990: Sanders 1991: Smith 1992: Smith 1993: Smith 1994: Sanders 1995: Smith 1996: Sanders 1997: Sanders 1998: Davis 1999: James 2000: James 2001: Holmes 2002: Williams 2003: Lewis 2004: Martin 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Tomlinson 2008: Peterson 2009: Johnson 2010: Foster 2011: Jones-Drew 2012: Peterson 2013: McCoy 2014: Murray 2015: Peterson 2016: Elliott 2017: Hunt

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NFL annual rushing touchdowns leaders

1932: Nagurski 1933: Presnell 1934: Clark & Feathers 1935: Caddel 1936: Clark 1937: Battles, Clark & Hinkle 1938: Farkas 1939: Drake 1940: Drake 1941: Gallarneau 1942: Famiglietti 1943: Paschal 1944: Paschal 1945: Van Buren 1946: Fritsch 1947: Van Buren 1948: Van Buren 1949: Van Buren 1950: Lujack 1951: Goode 1952: Towler 1953: Perry 1954: Towler 1955: Ameche 1956: Casares 1957: Brown 1958: Brown 1959: Brown 1960: Hornung 1961: Taylor 1962: Taylor 1963: Brown 1964: Moore 1965: Brown 1966: Kelly 1967: Kelly 1968: Kelly 1969: Matte 1970: Lane 1971: Thomas 1972: M. Morris 1973: Little & Simpson 1974: Sullivan 1975: Banaszak & Simpson 1976: Harris 1977: Payton 1978: D. Sims 1979: Campbell 1980: Campbell & B. Sims 1981: Muncie 1982: M. Allen 1983: Riggins 1984: Dickerson & Riggins 1985: J. Morris 1986: Rogers 1987: Hector & White 1988: Bell 1989: Bell 1990: Fenner & Gary 1991: Sanders 1992: Smith 1993: M. Allen 1994: Smith 1995: Smith 1996: T. Allen 1997: Abdul-Jabbar & T. Davis 1998: T. Davis 1999: S. Davis 2000: Faulk 2001: Alexander 2002: Holmes 2003: Holmes 2004: Tomlinson 2005: Alexander 2006: Tomlinson 2007: Tomlinson 2008: Williams 2009: Peterson 2010: Foster 2011: McCoy 2012: Foster 2013: Charles & Lynch 2014: Lynch & Murray 2015: Freeman, Hill, Peterson & Williams 2016: Blount 2017: Gurley

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NFL players with 10,000 rushing yards

Emmitt Smith Walter Payton Barry Sanders Curtis Martin Frank Gore LaDainian Tomlinson Jerome Bettis Eric Dickerson Tony Dorsett Jim Brown Marshall Faulk Adrian Peterson Edgerrin James Marcus Allen Franco Harris Thurman Thomas Fred Taylor Steven Jackson John Riggins Corey Dillon O. J. Simpson Warrick Dunn Ricky Watters Jamal Lewis Thomas Jones Tiki Barber Eddie George Ottis Anderson LeSean McCoy Ricky Williams Marshawn Lynch

Italics denotes active player

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National Football League
National Football League
running backs with 2,000 rushing yards in a single season

1973: O. J. Simpson 1984: Eric Dickerson 1997: Barry Sanders 1998: Terrell Davis 2003: Jamal Lewis 2009: Chris Johnson 2012: Adrian Peterson

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National Football League
National Football League
NFL's 1990s All-Decade Team

Brett Favre John Elway Barry Sanders Emmitt Smith Terrell Davis Thurman Thomas Cris Carter Jerry Rice Tim Brown Michael Irvin Shannon Sharpe Ben Coates Willie Roaf Gary Zimmerman Tony Boselli Richmond Webb Bruce Matthews Randall McDaniel Larry Allen Steve Wisniewski Dermontti Dawson Mark Stepnoski Bruce Smith Reggie White Chris Doleman Neil Smith Cortez Kennedy John Randle Warren Sapp Bryant Young Kevin Greene Junior Seau Derrick Thomas Cornelius Bennett Hardy Nickerson Levon Kirkland Deion Sanders Rod Woodson Darrell Green Aeneas Williams Steve Atwater LeRoy Butler Carnell Lake Ronnie Lott Darren Bennett Sean Landeta Morten Andersen Gary Anderson Mel Gray Michael Bates Bill Parcells Marv Levy

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Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pro Football Hall of Fame
Class of 2004

Bob Brown Carl Eller John Elway Barry Sanders

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Members of the Pro Football Hall of Fame

Quarterbacks

Pre-modern era

Baugh Clark Conzelman Driscoll Friedman Herber Luckman A. Parker

Modern era

Aikman Blanda Bradshaw L. Dawson Elway Favre Fouts Graham Griese Jurgensen J. Kelly Layne Marino Montana Moon Namath Stabler Starr Staubach Tarkenton Tittle Unitas Van Brocklin Warner Waterfield Young

Running backs

Pre-modern era

Battles Canadeo Dudley Grange Guyon Hinkle Lambeau Leemans McAfee McNally Nagurski Nevers Pollard Strong Thorpe Van Buren

Modern era

M. Allen Bettis J. Brown Campbell Csonka T. Davis Dickerson Dorsett Faulk Gifford Harris Hornung J. H. Johnson L. Kelly F. Little Martin Matson McElhenny Moore Motley Payton Perry Riggins B. Sanders Sayers Simpson E. Smith Jim Taylor T. Thomas Tomlinson Trippi Walker

Wide receivers / ends

Pre-modern era

Badgro Chamberlin Flaherty Halas Hewitt Hutson Millner

Modern era

Alworth Berry Biletnikoff T. Brown Carter Fears Harrison Hayes Hirsch Irvin Joiner Largent Lavelli Lofton Maynard McDonald Mitchell Monk Moss Owens Pihos Reed Rice Stallworth Swann C. Taylor Warfield

Tight ends

Casper Ditka Mackey Newsome C. Sanders Sharpe J. Smith Winslow

Offensive linemen

L. Allen B. Brown R. Brown Creekmur D. Dawson DeLamielleure Dierdorf Gatski Gregg Grimm Hannah Hickerson S. Jones W. Jones Kramer Langer L. Little Mack Matthews McCormack McDaniel Mix Munchak Muñoz Ogden Otto Pace J. Parker Ringo Roaf Shaw Shell Shields Slater St. Clair Stanfel Stephenson Tingelhoff Upshaw Webster Wright Yary Zimmerman

Pre-modern era two-way players

Edwards Fortmann Healey Hein Henry Hubbard Kiesling Kinard Lyman Michalske Musso Owen Stydahar Trafton Turner Wojciechowicz

Defensive linemen

Atkins Bethea Buchanan Culp W. Davis Dean Dent Doleman Donovan Eller Ford J. Greene Haley Hampton Humphrey D. Jones Jordan Kennedy Lilly Long Marchetti Nomellini Olsen Page Randle Robustelli Sapp Selmon B. Smith Stautner Strahan Ja. Taylor Weinmeister Ra. White Re. White Willis Youngblood

Linebackers

Bednarik Bo. Bell Brazile Brooks Buoniconti Butkus Carson Connor George K. Greene Ham Hanburger Hendricks Huff Jackson Lambert Lanier Lewis Nitschke Richter Robinson Schmidt Seau Singletary L. Taylor D. Thomas Tippett Urlacher Wilcox

Defensive backs

Adderley Barney Blount W. Brown Butler Christiansen Dawkins Easley Green Haynes Houston J. Johnson Krause Lane Lary LeBeau Lott Renfro D. Sanders E. Thomas Tunnell Wehrli Williams L. Wilson Wood Woodson

Placekickers and punters

Andersen Groza Guy Stenerud

Coaches

G. Allen P. Brown Chamberlin Conzelman Dungy Ewbank Flaherty Gibbs Gillman Grant Halas Lambeau Landry Levy Lombardi Madden Neale Noll Owen Parcells Shula Stram Walsh

Contributors

Beathard Be. Bell Bidwill Carr A. Davis DeBartolo Finks Halas Hunt J. Jones Lambeau T. Mara W. Mara Marshall Polian Ray Reeves A. Rooney D. Rooney Rozelle Sabol Schramm R. Wilson Wolf

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 75489561 LCCN: n91040

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