HOME
The Info List - Alex English


--- Advertisement ---



Alexander English (born January 5, 1954) is an American retired Hall of Fame basketball player. He was most recently an assistant coach with the Sacramento Kings of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Born in Columbia, South Carolina, he played college basketball at the University of South Carolina. Upon his arrival in Denver in 1980, English commenced an assault on the NBA scoring books. With the erratic, fast-paced, and high-scoring Nuggets, he averaged 21 points through the final 24 games of the 1979-80 season, then proceeded with averages of 24, 25, 28, 26, 28, nearly 30 (in the 1985–86 season), 29, 25, 27, and 18 points per game during his decade-long scoring spree. He also led the Nuggets to nine consecutive playoff appearances, two Midwest Division titles, and the 1985 Western Conference Finals. English set 31 team records throughout his decade in Denver, and was the leading scorer in 55% of the games he played for the Nuggets. In total, English played 15 seasons in the NBA for four different teams, averaging 21.5 points and 5.5 rebounds per game during his NBA career. He was named to eight NBA All-Star teams and made the All-NBA Second Team three times. His number 2 jersey was retired by the Denver Nuggets in 1992 and he was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1997.

Contents

1 Playing career

1.1 University of South Carolina 1.2 Milwaukee Bucks 1.3 Indiana Pacers 1.4 Denver Nuggets 1.5 Dallas Mavericks and Basket Napoli 1.6 Post-retirement and legacy

2 Coaching career 3 Post-coaching 4 Acting career 5 NBA career statistics

5.1 Regular season 5.2 Playoffs

6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Playing career[edit] University of South Carolina[edit] English attended the University of South Carolina in Columbia from 1972 to 1976. He started every game over a four-year career and was arguably the first African-American sports star at the school. He scored a record 1,972 points and was only the third player at the school to record over 1,000 rebounds and connect on better than 50% of his field goal attempts. English was selected to two independent All-America teams in 1975 and 1976. In the academic realm, English "developed interests that he still maintains in art, sculpture, literature, and, especially poetry." He graduated with a bachelor's degree in English in 1976.[1] Milwaukee Bucks[edit] English was drafted by the Milwaukee Bucks in the 2nd round of the 1976 NBA Draft with the 23rd pick.[2] Indiana Pacers[edit] English signed with the Indiana Pacers as a free agent after the 1977-78 season. English became a starter in Indiana and began to establish a reputation as a scorer, averaging 16 points per game during the 1978-79 season on another rebuilding team.[2] Denver Nuggets[edit] English was traded to the Denver Nuggets midway through the 1979–80 season for George McGinnis, a former Pacers star from their ABA days. Though coming off of an All-Star season in 1978-79, McGinnis was only a shadow of his former self and was out of the league by 1982.[3] In his first full season with the Nuggets in 1980-81, English averaged a then-career high 23.8 points.[4] In the 1981-82 season, English averaged 25.4 points and the team advanced to postseason play. He earned a position on the All-Star Team and All-NBA Second Team. The following year, in 1982-83, English won the league scoring title with an average of 28.4 points per game, while teammate Kiki Vandeweghe placed second averaging 26.7 points. Then in 1983-84 English placed fourth in the league in scoring.[2] In the 1984-85 season English raised his scoring average to 27.9 points to pick up some of the slack from Kiki Vandeweghe's departure. Denver won its division and secured the second seed in the Western Conference. In the 1985 playoffs, English averaged 30.2 points as the Nuggets defeated the San Antonio Spurs and Utah Jazz to meet the Los Angeles Lakers in the Western Conference Finals, where they would fall to the eventual NBA-champion Lakers in five games. English recorded his career-best average of 29.8 points per game in the following 1985-86 season, finishing third in the league behind Atlanta's Dominique Wilkins and Utah's Adrian Dantley. In the 1986 NBA All-Star Game, English set his All-Star career high by scoring 16 points on 8-of-12 shooting in 16 minutes off the bench for the West squad.[2] After the 1989-90 season, in which English's scoring average dipped to 17.9 and he largely struggled to maintain his level of play compared to previous seasons,[5] English became a free agent, and the Nuggets elected not to re-sign him.[2] Dallas Mavericks and Basket Napoli[edit] At age 36, English signed a one-year contract with the Dallas Mavericks where he once again played off the bench, this time averaging just under 10 points per game. No other NBA team signed him for the next season, and after a stint in Italy with Basket Napoli, English retired.[2] Post-retirement and legacy[edit] When English left Denver, he was the holder of nearly every team record, including most career points (21,645), assists (3,679), games (837) and minutes (29,893) in a Nuggets uniform, along with the highest career scoring average with the team (25.9) of any player. The Nuggets retired English's number 2 jersey in 1992. As of 2017[update], English's career 25,613 points place him 18th on the NBA's all-time career scoring list.[6] English was the first to achieve eight straight 2,000-point seasons, and he has the distinction of being the top scorer in the 1980s. He was elected to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1997.[2] Coaching career[edit] From June 2004 to July 2011, English was the director of player development and an assistant coach for the Toronto Raptors. He joined the Raptors after spending the previous two season as an assistant coach with the Philadelphia 76ers and Atlanta Hawks. On June 5, 2009, it was announced that English would stay with the Raptors as an assistant coach. On July 13, 2011, with the team heading in a new direction, English was not given a new contract, and his services were not retained. On January 13, 2012, he was added to the Sacramento Kings coaching staff under head coach Keith Smart. On June 5, 2013, new Kings coach Michael Malone announced that the 2012–13 assistant coaches, including English, would not be retained for the 2013–14 season.[7] Post-coaching[edit] It was announced that Alex English was added as a color analyst on SEC Network on November 11, 2014.[8] Since 2014, English has also been an active participant in the SportsUnited Sports Envoy program for the U.S. Department of State. In this function, he has traveled to Italy, the Republic of Korea, and Chile, where he worked with Nykesha Sales and Candace Wiggins to conduct basketball clinics and events that reached more than 1900 youth from underserved areas. In so doing, English helped contribute to SportsUnited's mission to reach out to youth populations in order to promote growth and a stable democratic government.[9][10][11] Acting career[edit] Alex English has dabbled in acting. His debut came in the 1987 motion picture Amazing Grace and Chuck, playing a fictitious Boston Celtics star. He has also had roles in the television series Midnight Caller 1989 and played the head coach of the Cleveland Cavaliers in Eddie (1996). To date[when?], his last role was as "The Premiere" in 1997's "The Definite Maybe." NBA career statistics[edit]

Legend

  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game

 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage

 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game

 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high

* Led the league

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1976–77 Milwaukee 60 6 10.8 .477 - .767 2.8 .4 .3 .3 3.2

1977–78 Milwaukee 82 4 18.9 .542 - .727 4.8 1.6 .5 .7 9.6

1978–79 Indiana 81 69 33.3 .511 - .752 8.1 3.3 .9 1.0 16.0

1979–80 Indiana 54 15 28.3 .504 .000 .814 7.0 2.6 .8 .6 14.9

1979–80 Denver 24 24 36.5 .485 .667 .762 9.4 3.4 1.2 1.2 21.3

1980–81 Denver 81 81 38.2 .494 .600 .850 8.0 3.6 1.3 1.2 23.8

1981–82 Denver 82 82 36.8 .551 .000 .840 6.8 5.3 1.1 1.5 25.4

1982–83 Denver 82 82 36.4 .516 .167 .829 7.3 4.8 1.4 1.5 28.4*

1983–84 Denver 82 77 35.0 .529 .143 .824 5.7 5.0 1.0 1.2 26.4

1984–85 Denver 81 81 36.1 .518 .200 .829 5.7 4.2 1.2 .6 27.9

1985–86 Denver 81 81 37.3 .504 .200 .862 5.0 4.0 .9 .4 29.8

1986–87 Denver 82 82 37.6 .503 .267 .844 4.2 5.1 .9 .3 28.6

1987–88 Denver 80 80 35.2 .495 .000 .828 4.7 4.7 .9 .3 25.0

1988–89 Denver 82 82 36.5 .491 .250 .858 4.0 4.7 .8 .1 26.5

1989–90 Denver 80 80 27.6 .491 .400 .880 3.6 2.8 .6 .3 17.9

1990–91 Dallas 79 26 22.1 .439 .000 .850 3.2 1.3 .5 .3 9.7

Career 1,193 753 31.9 .507 .217[a] .832 5.5 3.6 .9 .7 21.5

All-Star 8 4 18.5 .500 .000 .500 2.3 1.9 .8 .5 9.1

a The NBA adopted the three-point line in the 1979–80 season.

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG

1978 Milwaukee 9 - 23.1 .615 - .781 4.7 1.4 .7 .8 13.4

1982 Denver 3 - 39.3 .473 .000 .857 7.7 5.7 1.0 1.0 19.3

1983 Denver 7 - 38.6 .447 .000 .887 6.3 6.0 .6 1.0 25.9

1984 Denver 5 - 40.6 .588 .000 .893 8.0 5.6 .6 .4 29.0

1985 Denver 14 14 38.3 .536 .000 .890 6.6 4.5 1.2 .4 30.2

1986 Denver 10 10 39.4 .463 .000 .859 3.5 5.2 .4 .4 27.3

1987 Denver 3 3 25.3 .510 .000 .857 4.7 3.3 .0 .0 18.7

1988 Denver 11 11 39.8 .455 .000 .814 5.4 4.4 .6 .3 24.3

1989 Denver 3 3 36.0 .516 .000 .875 4.3 3.7 .3 .0 26.0

1990 Denver 3 3 25.3 .568 .000 .818 3.0 3.0 .7 .3 19.7

Career 68 44[b] 35.7 .503 .000[a] .862 5.5 4.3 .7 .5 24.4

a The NBA adopted the three-point line in the 1979–80 season. b Incomplete statistics.

See also[edit]

List of National Basketball Association career games played leaders List of National Basketball Association career scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association franchise career scoring leaders List of National Basketball Association career turnovers leaders List of National Basketball Association career minutes played leaders List of individual National Basketball Association scoring leaders by season

References[edit]

^ Basketball: A Biographical Dictionary, edited by David L. Porter, entry on Alex English by Peter C. Bjarkman, Westport, Connecticut, London: Greenwood Press, 2005. ^ a b c d e f g "NBA.com: Alex English Bio". www.nba.com. Retrieved 22 July 2017.  ^ Glenesk, Matthew. "Pacers at the trade deadline: A historical mixed bag". Indianapolis Star. Retrieved 22 July 2017.  ^ "ESPN Classic - NBA All-Star Profile: Alex English". www.espn.com. Retrieved 22 July 2017.  ^ Smith, Sam. "In Plain English: Alex Not A Happy Nugget". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 22 July 2017.  ^ https://www.basketball-reference.com/leaders/pts_career.html ^ Mike Malone tells assistant Kings coaches they will not be retained ^ Muller, Brad. "Alex English added as color analyst on SEC Network". Retrieved 22 July 2017.  ^ "NBA: Once a Neapolitan, Always a Neapolitan Naples, Italy – Consulate General of the United States". naples.usconsulate.gov. Archived from the original on 2016-03-28. Retrieved 2016-05-01.  ^ "(Yonhap Interview) U.S. sports envoys hope to inspire underprivileged kids to succeed". english.yonhapnews.co.kr. Retrieved 2016-05-01.  ^ "November 14 Santiago, Chile – Embassy of the United States". chile.usembassy.gov. Archived from the original on 2015-09-19. Retrieved 2016-05-01. 

External links[edit]

Basketball Hall of Fame profile Alex English at Basketball Reference Alex English on IMDb

Links to related articles

v t e

1976 NBA Draft

First round

John Lucas Scott May Richard Washington Leon Douglas Wally Walker Adrian Dantley Quinn Buckner Robert Parish Armond Hill Ron Lee Bob Wilkerson Terry Furlow Mitch Kupchak Larry Wright Chuckie Williams Norm Cook Sonny Parker

Second round

Willie Smith Bayard Forrest Major Jones Earl Tatum Johnny Davis Alex English Scott Lloyd Lonnie Shelton Jacky Dorsey Phil Hicks Bob Carrington Dennis Johnson Al Fleming Joe Pace Mo Howard Butch Feher Marshall Rogers

v t e

Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame Class of 1997

Players

Joan Crawford Denise Curry Alex English Bailey Howell

Coach

Pete Carril Antonio Díaz-Miguel Don Haskins

v t e

Milwaukee Bucks

Founded in 1968 Based in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Franchise

Franchise 1968 Expansion Draft All-time roster Draft history Seasons Records Head coaches Current season

Arenas

MECCA Arena BMO Harris Bradley Center Wisconsin Entertainment and Sports Center (planned for 2018)

General managers

Erickson Embry Nelson D. Harris Dunleavy Weinhauer Grunfeld L. Harris Hammond Horst

G League affiliate

Wisconsin Herd

Administration

Owner Wesley Edens & Marc Lasry General Manager Jon Horst Head Coach Joe Prunty (interm)

Retired numbers

1 2 4 10 14 16 32 33

Hall of Famers

Lew Alcindor Nate Archibald Dave Cowens Wayne Embry Alex English Bob Lanier Moses Malone Oscar Robertson

NBA Championships (1)

1971

Conference Championships (2)

1971 1974

Division titles (13)

1971 1972 1973 1974 1976 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 2001

Culture & lore

The Big O Bango The Fastest Expansion Champion MECCA Court Fear the Deer The Greek Freak

Media

TV Fox Sports Wisconsin

Jim Paschke (play-by-play) Gus Johnson (part-time play-by-play) Jon McGlocklin (color) Marques Johnson (part-time color)

Radio WTMJ

Ted Davis Dennis Krause

v t e

Denver Nuggets

Founded in 1967 Formerly the Denver Rockets (1967–1974) Based in Denver, Colorado

Franchise

Franchise ABA–NBA merger All-time roster Head coaches Seasons Draft history Records Current season

Arenas

Denver Auditorium Arena Denver Coliseum McNichols Sports Arena Pepsi Center

Retired numbers

2 12 33 40 44 55 432

D-League affiliate

None

Culture

Alex English Mt. Mutombo The Hey Song "Cartman Finds Love" (South Park)

Lore

Kansas City (ABA) 1976 ABA All-Star Game Knicks–Nuggets brawl

Media

TV Altitude Sports and Entertainment Radio KKFN KKSE Announcers Chris Marlowe Scott Hastings Jerry Schemmel

v t e

Members of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame

Players

Guards

R. Allen Archibald Beckman Belov Bing Blazejowski Borgmann Brennan Cervi Cheeks Clayton Cooper-Dyke Cousy Dampier Davies Drexler Dumars Edwards Frazier Friedman Galis Gervin Goodrich Greer Guerin Hanson Haynes Holman Hyatt Isaacs Iverson Jeannette D. Johnson E. Johnson K. Jones S. Jones Jordan Kidd Lieberman Maravich Marcari Marčiulionis Martin McDermott McGrady D. McGuire Meyers R. Miller Monroe C. Murphy Nash Page Payton Petrović Phillip Posey Richmond Robertson Rodgers Roosma J. Russell Schommer Scott Sedran Sharman K. Smith Staley Steinmetz Stockton Swoopes Thomas Thompson Vandivier Wanzer West J. White Wilkens Woodard Wooden

Forwards

Arizin Barkley Barry Baylor Bird Bradley R. Brown Cunningham Curry Dalipagić Dantley DeBusschere Dehnert Endacott English Erving Foster Fulks Gale Gates Gola Hagan Havlicek Hawkins Hayes Haywood Heinsohn Hill Howell G. Johnson King Lucas Luisetti K. Malone McClain B. McCracken J. McCracken McGinnis McHale Mikkelsen C. Miller Mullin Pettit Pippen Pollard Radja Ramsey Rodman Schayes E. Schmidt O. Schmidt Stokes C. Thompson T. Thompson Twyman Walker Washington N. White Wilkes Wilkins Worthy Yardley

Centers

Abdul-Jabbar Barlow Beaty Bellamy Chamberlain Ćosić Cowens Crawford Daniels DeBernardi Donovan Ewing Gallatin Gilmore Gruenig Harris-Stewart Houbregs Issel W. Johnson Johnston M. Krause Kurland Lanier Leslie Lovellette Lapchick Macauley M. Malone McAdoo Meneghin Mikan Mourning S. Murphy Mutombo Olajuwon O'Neal Parish Pereira Reed Risen Robinson B. Russell Sabonis Sampson Semjonova Thurmond Unseld Wachter Walton Yao

Coaches

Alexeeva P. Allen Anderson Auerbach Auriemma Barmore Barry Blood Boeheim L. Brown Calhoun Calipari Cann Carlson Carnesecca Carnevale Carril Case Chancellor Chaney Conradt Crum Daly Dean Díaz-Miguel Diddle Drake Driesell Ferrándiz Gaines Gamba Gardner Gaze Gill Gomelsky Gunter Hannum Harshman Haskins Hatchell Heinsohn Hickey Hobson Holzman Hughes Hurley Iba Izzo P. Jackson Julian Keaney Keogan Knight Krzyzewski Kundla Lambert Leonard Lewis Litwack Loeffler Lonborg Magee McCutchan McGraw A. McGuire F. McGuire McLendon Meanwell Meyer Miller Moore Nelson Nikolić Novosel Olson Pitino Ramsay Richardson Riley Rubini Rupp Rush Sachs Self Sharman Shelton Sloan D. Smith Stringer Summitt Tarkanian Taylor Teague J. Thompson VanDerveer Wade Watts Wilkens G. Williams R. Williams Wooden Woolpert Wootten Yow

Contributors

Abbott Barksdale Bee Biasone H. Brown W. Brown Bunn Buss Clifton Colangelo Cooper Davidson Douglas Duer Embry Fagan Fisher Fleisher Gavitt Gottlieb Granik Gulick Harrison Hearn Henderson Hepp Hickox Hinkle Irish M. Jackson Jernstedt Jones Kennedy Knight J. Krause Lemon Liston Lloyd McLendon Lobo Mokray Morgan Morgenweck Naismith Newell Newton J. O'Brien L. O'Brien Olsen Podoloff Porter Raveling Reid Reinsdorf Ripley Sanders Saperstein Schabinger St. John Stagg Stanković Steitz Stern Taylor Thorn Tower Trester Vitale Wells Welts Wilke Winter Zollner

Referees

Bavetta Enright Garretson Hepbron Hoyt Kennedy Leith Mihalik Nichols Nucatola Quigley Rudolph Shirley Strom Tobey Walsh

Teams

1960 United States Olympic Team 1992 United States Olympic Team All-American Red Heads Buffalo Germans The First Team Harlem Globetrotters Immaculata College New York Renaissance Original Celtics Texas Western

v t e

J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award

1975: Unseld 1976: Watts 1977: Bing 1978: Lanier 1979: Murphy 1980: Carr 1981: Glenn 1982: Benson 1983: Erving 1984: Layden 1985: Issel 1986: Cooper & Sparrow 1987: Thomas 1988: English 1989: Bailey 1990: Rivers 1991: K. Johnson 1992: M. Johnson 1993: Porter 1994: Dumars 1995: O'Toole 1996: Dudley 1997: Brown 1998: Smith 1999: Grant 2000: Divac 2001: Mutombo 2002: Mourning 2003: Robinson 2004: Miller 2005: Snow 2006: Garnett 2007: Nash 2008: Billups 2009: Mutombo 2010: Dalembert 2011: Artest 2012: Gasol 2013: Faried 2014: Deng 2015: Noah 2016: Ellington 2017: James

v t e

National Basketball Players Association presidents

Bob Cousy (1954–1958) Tom Heinsohn (1958–1965) Oscar Robertson (1965–1974) Paul Silas (1974–1980) Bob Lanier (1980–1985) Junior Bridgeman (1985–1988) Alex English (1988) Isiah Thomas (1988–1994) Buck Williams (1994–1997) Patrick Ewing (1997–2001) Michael Curry (2001–2005) Antonio Davis (2005–2006) Derek Fisher (2006–2013) Chris Paul (2013– )

v t e

National Basketball Players Association executive director

Larry Fleisher (1970–1988) Charles Grantham (1988–1995) Simon Gourdine (1995–1996) Alex English # (1996) Billy Hunter (1996–2013) Michele Roberts (2014–present)

Pound sign (#) denotes interim executive director.

v t e

NBA season scoring leaders

1947: Fulks 1948: Zaslofsky 1949: Mikan 1950: Mikan 1951: Mikan 1952: Arizin 1953: Johnston 1954: Johnston 1955: Johnston 1956: Pettit 1957: Arizin 1958: Yardley 1959: Pettit 1960: Chamberlain 1961: Chamberlain 1962: Chamberlain 1963: Chamberlain 1964: Chamberlain 1965: Chamberlain 1966: Chamberlain 1967: Barry 1968: Bing 1969: Hayes 1970: West 1971: Alcindor 1972: Abdul-Jabbar 1973: Archibald 1974: McAdoo 1975: McAdoo 1976: McAdoo 1977: Maravich 1978: Gervin 1979: Gervin 1980: Gervin 1981: Dantley 1982: Gervin 1983: English 1984: Dantley 1985: King 1986: Wilkins 1987: Jordan 1988: Jordan 1989: Jordan 1990: Jordan 1991: Jordan 1992: Jordan 1993: Jordan 1994: Robinson 1995: O'Neal 1996: Jordan 1997: Jordan 1998: Jordan 1999: Iverson 2000: O'Neal 2001: Iverson 2002: Iverson 2003: McGrady 2004: McGrady 2005: Iverson 2006: Bryant 2007: Bryant 2008: James 2009: Wade 2010: Durant 2011: Durant 2012: Durant 2013: Anthony 2014: Durant 2015: Westbrook 2016: Curry 2017: Westbrook

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 359263

.