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The first confirmed case in the United States of the 2019–20 coronavirus pandemic was announced on January 21, 2020. By March 12, 2020, diagnosed cases of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) in the U.S. exceeded 1,000.[3][4] Of the 40 deaths in the country, 31 had occurred in the state of Washington, with 13 of those at a nursing home.[5] Confirmed cases had appeared in 47 out of the 50 U.S. states, and the District of Columbia. Only 3 states had no cases yet reported (Alabama, Idaho, and West Virginia).

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued "Level 3" travel advisories for China, certain European countries, Iran, and South Korea, recommending against any non-essential travel to these regions by Americans. The United States is also denying entry to foreign nationals who have traveled in China, Iran, or beginning March 14, certain European countries, within the past 14 days. Americans returning home after traveling in China's Hubei Province have been required to submit to a 14-day quarantine. Any U.S. citizen returning to the United States who has been in the rest of mainland China within the previous 14 days may be required to undergo a health screening and possible self-quarantine.[6][7]

In late February, the CDC and other public-health agencies reported that they expected the virus to spread in the United States, and urged local governments, schools, and businesses to discourage large gatherings, and employ remote work.[8] On March 7, the CDC confirmed that there have been cases of "community" transmission of the virus, person-to-person with unknown source — and that this was likely to continue in the coming days. The CDC warned that widespread transmission may force large numbers of people to seek hospitalization and other healthcare, which may overload healthcare systems.[9]

Responses to the outbreak have included prohibitions and cancellation of large-scale gatherings, including the closure of schools and other educational institutions, the cancellation of trade shows, conventions, music festivals, as well as sporting events—a measure which intensified on March 11, especially within basketball, after the World Health Organization declared the coronavirus outbreak to be a pandemic.[10]


COVID-19 cases in the United States  ()
     Deaths        Cases
Date
# of cases
2020-01-21
1 (+1) (n.a.)
1 (=) (=)
2020-01-24
2 (+1) (+100%)
2020-01-25
3 (+1) (+50%)
2020-01-26
5 (+2) (+67%)
5 (=) (=)
2020-01-30
6 (+1) (+20%)
2020-01-31
7 (+1) (+17%)
2020-02-01
8 (+1) (+14%)
2020-02-02
11 (+3) (+38%)
11 (=) (=)
2020-02-05
12 (+1) (+9%)
12 (=) (=)
2020-02-20
14 (+2) (+17%)
14 (=) (=)
2020-02-26
15 (+1) (+7%)
2020-02-27
15 (=) (=)
2020-02-28
19 (+4) (+27%)
2020-02-29
24 (+5) (+26%)
2020-03-01
42 (+18) (+75%)
2020-03-02
57 (+15) (+36%)
2020-03-03
85 (+28) (+49%)
2020-03-04
111 (+26) (+31%)
2020-03-05
175 (+64) (+58%)
2020-03-06
252 (+77) (+44%)
2020-03-07
352 (+100) (+40%)
2020-03-08
495 (+143) (+41%)
2020-03-09
643 (+148) (+29%)
2020-03-10
932 (+289) (+44%)
2020-03-11
1,203 (+271) (+29%)
2020-03-12
1,561 (+358) (+30%)
Cases: The number of non-repatriated cases as documented in the Timeline Table.
Sources: Official reports from state health officials. See Timeline Table for the sources.

Timeline

January

President Donald Trump received a briefing on the coronavirus in China, January 2020

The first reported case in the U.S. was in Washington state on January 21, 2020, which affected a man who had returned from Wuhan, China.[11] He was released after two weeks of treatment. A few days later, another case was reported in Chicago, by a woman who had also just returned from Wuhan.[12] A third case was confirmed a day later in Orange County, California.[13] Two more cases were confirmed on January 26th, similarly by two people who had returned from Wuhan.[14] All of the cases to that point were allowed to self-isolate at home for two weeks, after which time they were no longer infected.

As Wuhan was the capital of China’s Hubei Province, the U.S. government evacuated 195 of its employees along with other U.S. citizens, to an air force base in Riverside, California on January 29th, where they were kept under quarantine for 14 days, although none of them had been infected.[15] On January 30, the first case of person-to-person transmission was confirmed in Chicago, between a married couple, after the wife had returned from China.[16] On the same day, the World Health Organization (WHO) named the coronavirus outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China, a public health emergency of international concern.[16]

The following day, another case of a person who had returned from Wuhan was confirmed in California, which marked the seventh known case in the U.S.[17] That was followed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services declaring a public health emergency, and imposing a mandatory 14-day quarantine for any U.S. citizens who had visited Hubei Province within the preceding two weeks. It also began denying entry of non-U.S. nationals who had traveled to China within the preceding two weeks. This was the first such travel restriction by the U.S. in more than 50 years,[18] and was soon followed by Australia and Japan imposing similar travel restrictions.[19]

February

Members of the Coronavirus Task Force hold a press briefing at the White House on February 26

On a near daily basis, new cases were being reported throughout the country, with many of those of people having recently returned from China. They included a college student from Boston and a woman in California, both of whom returned from Wuhan.[20][21] Two more cases of person-to-person transmission were also reported in California. By February 5, the twelfth case was of another college student from Wisconsin.[22]

That same day, the U.S. evacuated 345 citizens from Hubei Province and taken to two air bases in California to be quarantined for 14 days.[23] One more government evacuation flight took place on Feb. 6, containing 300 passengers, most of whom were taken to bases in Nebraska and Texas. By that time, more than 500 people were quarantined at three different air bases.[24] From February 12 to 15, three more cases were confirmed, all of whom came from Wuhan, and similarly quarantined.[25][26]

On February 15, the government evacuated 338 U.S. nationals stranded aboard the cruise ship Diamond Princess, which had been held in quarantine in Yokohama, Japan.[27] Fourteen of those repatriated people were infected with the virus.[28] Five more nationals who were also reported as being infected were evacuated from the ship the following week, and were quarantined at an air base in California. Six more cases were subsequently confirmed among those who were evacuated from the cruise ship.[29]

On February 20 and 21, two more cases were confirmed in California, both of whom had returned from China.[30] The first case of community transmission, because it had no known origin, was confirmed in Solano County, California, on February 26.[31] A second case of unknown origin was confirmed two days later, also in California, followed by others in Oregon and Washington state.[32]

On February 29: The first death from coronavirus in the US was reported at EvergreenHealth in Kirkland, Washington, followed by two other confirmed cases, those in a nursing home in the same city.[33] New cases continued to show up in California and Illinois.[34]

March

March 1–2

Vice President Mike Pence meets with White House coronavirus task force principals on March 2 in the White House Situation Room

In New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced the state's first reported case of COVID-19: a woman in her late 30s, who apparently contracted the virus while traveling in Iran and who was isolating herself in her home in New York City.[35] Oregon confirmed its second case, a household contact of its first case.[36] The Rhode Island Department of Health announced a presumptive case in a person in their 40s who had traveled to Italy in mid-February,[37] and a second case, a teenager who had traveled with the first person.[38]

On March 2, coronavirus cases in the U.S. reached 100, including repatriated citizens from Wuhan or the Diamond Princess.[39] Georgia officials announced the state's first two cases: a Fulton County man in his 50s who had recently returned from a work trip to Milan and his 15-year-old son.[40][41] New Hampshire officials announced the state's first case, an employee with Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center who had been to Italy.[42]

March 3–4

On March 3, Arizona's Department of Health Services reported a new confirmed case in Maricopa County, a man in his 20s who had made contact with a case outside of Arizona. The man is currently isolated at his home.[43] In New Hampshire, public health officials confirmed a second case of coronavirus in an individual who made contact with the first case after the first case defied quarantine orders and attended a private event organized by Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business in White River Junction, Vermont.[44][45] New York officials announced the state's second confirmed case: a man in his 50s in New Rochelle, Westchester County[46][47] who had not recently traveled to any foreign countries affected by the outbreak.[48] In North Carolina, Governor Roy Cooper announced the state's first confirmed case: a person who had traveled to Washington and was "exposed at a long term care facility." They are currently in stable condition and in isolation at their home.[49]

On March 4, the US Department of Homeland Security confirmed that a "contract medical screener" for the CDC working at the Los Angeles International Airport tested positive for coronavirus. The individual is in self-isolation at home.[50] In New Jersey, Governor Phil Murphy reported the state's first case, a presumptive positive test result in a man in his 30s who has been hospitalized in Bergen County since March 3.[51][52] New York officials confirmed four new cases of coronavirus: the wife, son, and daughter of the second case, as well as the man's neighbor who drove him to the hospital. The new cases prompted the partial closure of the main campus of Yeshiva University, where the man's son is a student, as well as the high school in the Bronx borough of New York City where the daughter is a student.[53][54][55] On the same day, another five confirmed cases were reported in a friend of the second case, as well as that friend's wife, two sons, and daughter.[56][57] In Texas, public health officials in Fort Bend County reported a presumptive positive test result in a man in his 70s who had recently travelled outside the United States. The man was hospitalized in stable condition. The new case is the first in Texas outside of US nationals evacuated from Hubei Province and the Diamond Princess cruise ship to Joint Base San Antonio in January 2020.[58][59]

March 5

Nevada, Colorado, Tennessee, and Maryland announced their first cases, New Jersey announced a second presumptive case, while Washington announced 31 new cases.

  • Illinois: Public health officials in Chicago reported a fifth case of coronavirus in a man in his 20s who recently traveled to Italy and returned to Illinois on a flight to Chicago O'Hare International Airport. The new case was hospitalized at Rush University Medical Center.[60]
  • Maryland: Governor Larry Hogan confirmed the first three cases of coronavirus in Montgomery County: one married couple in their 70s and an unrelated woman in her 50s, all three of which had travelled outside the United States in the same group. All three cases are in self-isolation at their respective homes.[61][62][63][64]
  • Nevada: Public health officials in Las Vegas reported that state's first confirmed case of coronavirus: a man in his 50s in Clark County who recently traveled to Washington state and Texas.[65] Also, public health officials announced a second confirmed case of coronavirus in Reno. The new case, a man in his 50s, is in isolation at his home; the new case is linked to at least two other confirmed cases in Sonoma County, California and in Placer County, California among passengers who had been aboard the Grand Princess on a cruise from San Francisco to Mexico during the previous month.[66][67]
  • New Jersey: Officials announced that they are investigating a second presumptive case of coronavirus.[68]
  • Tennessee: Governor Bill Lee reported his state's first case: a man in his 40s in Williamson County who had recently traveled outside the state.[69]
  • Texas: Public health officials in Houston reported two confirmed cases in a man and a woman from northwest Harris County. Both cases are related to recent travel to Egypt.[70] In the evening, an additional two cases, a man and a woman, were reported from Harris County also from the same travel group to Egypt. The woman is a staff member at Rice University.[71]

March 6

Ten states reported their first case of coronavirus: Hawaii, Utah, Nebraska, Kentucky, Indiana, Minnesota, Connecticut, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Oklahoma. Many cases were associated with passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship, which was being held off the California coast near San Francisco. Testing on the ship revealed 21 positives. The day also saw 6 deaths reported. Four were reported from Washington and were reported by the hospital that treated patients from the LifeCare long-term care facility. Two were reported from Florida, and represent the third state besides Washington and California to report deaths. This brings the total deaths to 18, 15 in Washington, 1 in California, and 2 in Florida.

  • Grand Princess: Twenty-one passengers on the Grand Princess cruise ship tested positive for the coronavirus, 19 staff and 2 passengers.[72]
  • Arizona: Public health officials announced the state's third case and first community transmission case in a Pinal County woman.[73]
  • Connecticut: Governor Ned Lamont confirmed his state's first case of coronavirus in a hospital employee, a New York resident who is currently under self-quarantine back home in Westchester County, New York.[74]
  • Georgia: Public health officials reported a presumptive positive case involving a 46-year-old woman in Floyd County.[75][76]
  • Hawaii: Governor David Ige announced its first case of coronavirus, a resident that was a passenger of the Grand Princess which stopped in Hawaii in late February.[77]
  • In Illinois, a sixth case was reported in Chicago. The patient, a classroom assistant in the Vaughn Occupational High School, had been on the Grand Princess cruise.[78]
  • Indiana: The state reported its first case in an Indianapolis man who returned from travel to Boston.[79]
  • Kentucky: Governor Andy Beshear confirms the states first case, a Lexington resident.[80][81]
  • Minnesota: announced its first presumptive case, an elderly person, living in Ramsey County, who had been on a cruise ship recently.[82] The patient was reported as being in quarantine in their home.[83]
  • Nebraska: Governor Pete Ricketts announced the first presumptive positive case of coronavirus in Nebraska, a woman in her 30s from Douglas County who came back from England at the end of February.[84] She was initially hospitalized at Methodist Hospital, and was being transferred to the Biocontainment Unit at the University of Nebraska Medical Center after her test result came back positive.[84]
  • New Jersey: Officials announced a third presumptive case of coronavirus in Camden County and fourth case in Bergen County.[85][86]
  • New York: Eleven new cases were reported bringing the state caseload to 33.[87] All the new cases were tied to the first community transmission case, a Manhattan lawyer in Westchester County.[88] At the end of the day, an additional 11 new cases were reported by the Governor, bringing the total caseload to 44. 8 of new cases in Westchester County, and 3 of the new cases in Nassau County.[89]
  • North Carolina: Public health officials announced a second confirmed case of coronavirus in a man in Chatham County who had recently traveled to Italy.[90][91]
  • Oklahoma: Officials announced its first confirmed case of coronavirus in a Tulsa County man who had recently traveled to Italy.[92]
  • Pennsylvania: Governor Tom Wolf reported his state's first two confirmed cases of coronavirus in Delaware County and in Wayne County.[93][94] Both cases were related to travel.[95][96][97]
  • Rhode Island: The state confirmed its third case, a woman who had contact with a positive case in New York in late February.[98]
  • South Carolina reported two presumptive cases in Kershaw County and Charleston County.[99]
  • Texas: Three new cases were reported, one in Houston and two in Fort Bend County. All cases were part of a group that had traveled together to Egypt. This brought the Texas cases to 8, all in the Houston region.[100][101]
  • Utah: The Department of Health confirmed that a former passenger on the Grand Princess was the first (presumptive) case of coronavirus in Utah.[102]

March 7

Virginia, Kansas, Missouri, and Washington, D.C. announced their first cases. 1 new death was reported for March 7 in Washington. This brought the total confirmed US deaths due to coronavirus to 19, 16 in Washington, 1 in California, and 2 in Florida.

  • New York: 32 new cases were confirmed by the governor, bringing the total to 76.[103] Governor Cuomo declared a state of emergency.[104]
  • Oregon: Health officials identified four new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 among residents in Jackson, Klamath and Washington counties.[105]
  • Pennsylvania: Governor Tom Wolf announced two new positive cases in Montgomery County; both cases were related to travel within the United States.[106]
  • Virginia: The state announced its first case, a US Marine assigned to Fort Belvoir. He had recently traveled abroad.[107]
  • Washington, D.C.: Mayor Muriel Bowser announced the district's first (presumptive) positive coronavirus case.[108]

March 8

Iowa and Vermont reported their first cases of infection with the coronavirus. Three new deaths were reported in WA. This brought the total confirmed US deaths due to coronavirus to 22: 19 in Washington, 1 in California, and 2 in Florida.

  • Georgia: Governor Brian Kemp announced that a number of Americans on the cruise ship Grand Princess — including 34 Georgians — would be "securely transferred" to Dobbins Air Reserve Base for testing and quarantine on March 9 or 10. That night, Kemp said four currently hospitalized Georgians had been tested for COVID-19, with the Georgia Department of Public Health waiting for confirmation from the CDC; one person is a resident of Cherokee County, two are residents of Cobb County, and one a resident of Fulton County.[109][110]
  • Hawaii: Second case reported by Governor David Ige and State health officials is an elderly man who tested positive after returning from travel in Washington state earlier this month. He is now hospitalized and under isolation at Kaiser Permanente' Moanalua medical facility.[111]
  • Indiana: Second and third cases were reported, both in Hendricks County. The third case is an elementary student, resulting in recommendation from Hendricks County Health Department for closure of Hickory Elementary school for two weeks beginning March 9. This is the first school closing to occur in Indiana due to the current outbreak.[112][113]
  • Iowa: Governor Kim Reynolds confirmed the state's first three positive cases in Johnson County.
  • Maryland: Gov. Larry Hogan confirms 2 new cases of coronavirus: 1 additional case in Montgomery County, and 1 in Harford County.[114]
  • New Jersey: Announces 2 presumptive positive cases, bringing total to 6.[115]
  • New York: The state of New York reported 16 new confirmed cases and a total of 106 cases statewide.[116]
    • NYC issues new commuter guidelines amid the current outbreak, asking sick individuals to stay off public transit, encouraging citizens to avoid densely packed buses, subways or trains.[117]
  • Minnesota: The state of Minnesota reported 1 new case in Carver County and a total of 2 cases in Minnesota. The patient experienced symptoms on the 2nd of March, and is in the 50-59 age group. Thus far, both cases have been associated with travel.[118]
  • Oregon: Oregon Health Authority adds 7 new presumptive positive cases to Oregon’s COVID-19 count [119]
  • South Carolina: 4 more presumptive positive cases, for a total of 6. One recently traveled to Italy, two are connected to a previous case, and one is of unknown origin.
  • Vermont: Vermont health officials announced the state’s first “presumptive positive” case in Bennington County.
  • Virginia: The state of Virginia reported its second presumptive positive case, an 80-year-old man from Fairfax who had recently returned from a cruise on the Nile River.[120]

March 9

Ohio reported its first cases. As of March 9, Alabama, Alaska, Idaho, Maine, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota, and West Virginia have no cases, while Montana, Delaware, Wyoming and Arkansas have suspected cases. Washington reported 3 new deaths and California 1, bringing the number of US coronavirus deaths to 26.

  • California: Santa Clara County reported the state's second coronavirus death.[121] 3 tested positive in Sacramento County, California.[122]
  • Illinois: Four additional cases were announced in Cook County, bringing the state's total number of cases to eleven. Governor J. B. Pritzker also announced a disaster proclamation (a state of emergency) for the state of Illinois.[123]
  • Indiana: A case was reported in Noble County, the state's 4th.[124]
  • Iowa: Five new presumptive positive cases were announced, bringing the statewide total to eight. Governor Kim Reynolds signed a Proclamation of Disaster Emergency.[125]
  • Kentucky: Governor Andy Beshear confirmed two new cases bringing the state's total to six.[126]
  • Louisiana: Governor John Bel Edwards reported the state’s first presumptive case of coronavirus in the New Orleans metro region.[127]
  • Missouri: St. Louis County Executive Dr. Sam Page reported that the father and younger sister of the state's first coronavirus patient violated a self-quarantine order, attending a father-daughter function for her high school, Villa Duchesne, at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Clayton. The pair also attended a party for students from both Villa and the John Burroughs School before heading to the hotel. Both Villa and John Burroughs cancelled classes following the announcement, and the Ritz-Carlton was to undergo substantial cleaning.[128]
  • New Jersey: Governor Phil Murphy declared a state of emergency in New Jersey as the number of cases grew to 11.[129]
  • North Carolina: 5 new presumptively positive cases were reported in Wake County. According to NCDHHS, all five had traveled to Boston in late February to attend a conference. This brings the total number of cases in North Carolina to 7.[130]
  • Ohio: Governor Mike DeWine reported Ohio’s first 3 cases in Cuyahoga County.[131] Later that day, The Ohio State University moved all in-person classes to an online format until at least March 30.[132]
  • South Carolina: One additional presumptive positive case was reported, raising the total to 7. Additionally, there is a "possible" case at Clemson University.
  • Texas: Collin County reported 3 new presumptive cases.[133] The patients were a married couple and their 3-year old child who attended Frisco ISD. The man was tested positive virus after visiting Silicon Valley in late February.[134]
  • Virginia: The state reported 3 more presumptive positive cases: a man in his mid 60s from Arlington County who had recently travelled internationally,[135] a woman from Fairfax City who is the spouse of the patient reported the day before, and a Spotsylvania County resident.[136] This brings the total number of cases in the state to 5.

March 10

Location of the New Rochelle Containment Area within Westchester County, New York.

South Dakota and Michigan reported their first cases. Mitigation measures expanded in New York, Massachusetts and Washington with transition to online classes for universities and colleges and with the first semi-containment zone announced in New York. Two new deaths were reported in Washington and one death each reported in California, New Jersey and South Dakota. This brought the total US deaths to 31 (24 WA, 3 CA, 2 FL, 1 NJ, 1 SD).

  • California: A resident of a retirement home tested positive in Elk Grove, California in Sacramento County. County health officials said they have the capacity to only test 20 people per day and would be focusing all their efforts on the other residents of the retirement home.[137] That resident died from complications of the virus on the same day.[138]
  • Colorado: Gov. Jared Polis announced 17 total presumptive positive cases in the state and declared a state of emergency. [1]
  • District of Columbia: The George Washington University announces classes will be moved online after Spring Break, starting on March 23 and continue until at least April 5. In addition, all residential students are expected to no longer be living on campus as of March 21 until the end of the instructional continuity period when a decision for the rest of the semester would be made.[139]
  • Georgia: The Department of Public Health reported five additional cases, bringing the state total to 22. The majority of cases are in Cobb County (7 cases) and Fulton County (6 cases).[140]
  • Illinois: Governor J. B. Pritzker announced eight new presumptive positive cases, two of which were the first cases outside of Cook County. These cases brought Illinois's total number of cases to 19.[141]
  • Louisiana: State officials confirmed 2 new cases also in the New Orleans area bringing the state's total to 3, with 3 additional presumptive cases sent to the CDC for confirmation. Mayor Latoya Cantrell and other city officials announced the cancellation of weekend parades as a precaution.[142]
  • Massachusetts: Governor Charlie Baker announced 51 new presumptive positive cases, bringing the state's total to 92, and declared a state of emergency in the state.[143]
  • Michigan: The state's first two confirmed cases were reported, one each in Wayne and Oakland counties.[144]
  • Minnesota: A third case in the state was confirmed in Anoka County. The individual was in the 30-39 year old range and had no reported underlying conditions. The resident was in critical condition. According to health officials, the case was not transmitted in the state and there is no evidence at this time that the virus is spreading from person to person in Minnesota. Gov. Tim Walz signed a $21 million bill for funding COVID-19 preparedness.[145]
  • New York: Governor Andrew Cuomo announced a semi-containment zone in the city of New Rochelle to be enforced from March 12 to March 25, with schools, houses of worship, and other large gathering spaces closed, but no travel ban. Gov. Cuomo said, “You’re not containing people. You’re containing facilities.”[146]
  • Ohio: Mount Vernon Nazarene University states that they will be moving classes to an online format by March 16 after 19 students came back from spring break in Italy.[147]
  • Oregon: The Oregon Health Authority announced Multnomah County’s first presumptive positive case of COVID-19. This brings Oregon’s total to fifteen cases in seven counties.[148]
  • South Dakota: Health officials announced the state’s first five confirmed cases and one death. The lone death tested positive for COVID-19, but the cause of death is still being investigated.[149]
  • Texas: Dallas County and Tarrant County both announced one presumptive case in each county, respectively.[150]
  • Utah: Weber County reported a confirmed case, the second in the state.[151]
  • Virginia: Health officials in Loudoun County announced that a county resident tested presumptive positive for coronavirus, bringing the state’s total to 8.[152]
  • Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee announced that classes would be begin to be moved online after an employee in the school's foundation office was tested for COVID-19.[153]

March 11

Confirmed coronavirus cases in the United States surpassed 1,100.[154] Arkansas, Delaware, Mississippi, New Mexico and North Dakota reported their first cases. More universities and colleges suspended classes or moved to remote-access teaching. Washington governor Jay Inslee ordered a halt to all gatherings of greater than 250 in three counties, while Ohio governor Mike DeWine ordered all public gatherings of more than 1,000 people to be banned statewide. Five new deaths were reported in Washington and one death in California. This brought the total US deaths to 37 (29 WA, 4 CA, 2 FL, 1 NJ, 1 SD).

  • Arkansas: Governor Asa Hutchinson reported his state's first presumed positive case, a patient in Pine Bluff who had recently traveled outside the state.[155]
  • Connecticut: Several towns in Connecticut announced that schools would close for at least two weeks beginning March 12, including New Canaan, where the state's third case was confirmed.[156]
  • District of Columbia: Georgetown University announced all classes on all campuses will resume after spring break by live video conference only, and all campuses will be open for key services only.[157] Maria Cantwell, a U.S. senator from Washington state, closed her D.C. office because one of her aides tested positive for the virus.[158]
  • Delaware: The University of Delaware suspended classes for the remainder of the week and moved spring break following a confirmed case of coronavirus in the state.
  • Georgia: The state announced nine more cases, making the total 31 presumed, of which 12 are confirmed.[159]
  • Illinois: 6 new cases of the coronavirus were reported, bringing the total to 25.[160] Northwestern University announces an extension of spring break for an additional week followed by holding classes remotely until at least April 27.[161] Courses at the University of Illinois will be held entirely online after spring break; residence and dining halls will remain open.[162]
  • Indiana: Had 5 more cases, bringing the total to 11.[163] The University of Notre Dame announced that in-person classes will be suspended and moved online until at least April 13.[164]
  • Louisiana: The total number of cases rose to 13, with 10 new, presumptive positive cases reported in 6 parishes, the first outside of the Orleans metro region and in the river parishes.[165]
  • Maine: The University of Maine in Orono announced that in-person classes would be cancelled for the remainder of the semester beginning March 23, and that all classes would be transitioned to online only. In addition, all students living on campus were required to be moved out by March 22. [166]
  • Maryland: The University of Maryland announced classes would move online until at least April 10. [167]
  • Massachusetts: 3 new cases reported, all in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. MA now has 95 cases: 77 related to Biogen, 4 travel-related, and 14 of currently unknown origin.[168]
  • Michigan: The University of Michigan announced classes would be moving online for the rest of the year and large gatherings would be canceled.[169]
  • Minnesota: The University of Minnesota announced that all in-person classes would be suspended until at least April 1 following spring break.[170] Two more cases were confirmed, bringing the total number of cases to five.[171]
  • Missouri: Washington University in Saint Louis announced a switch to online classes until at least late April and asked undergraduates to go home by March 15.
  • Mississippi: Health officials reported the state's first case, a man who had recently traveled to Florida.[172]
  • New Mexico: 3 presumptive positive cases, a couple in their 60s who recently traveled to Egypt and one in her 70s who recently traveled to the New York City area.[173]
  • New York: Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that all City University of New York and State University of New York schools will move most classes to an online based system starting March 19. Dormitories will remain open for students "who cannot return home for hardship reasons." [174]
  • JFK New York to PBI Florida Jet Blue: A man wearing a mask and gloves with symptoms who knowingly tested positive for Coronavirus boarded a JetBlue plane from JFK Airport with his knowing wife to PBI Airport in West Palm Beach, FL, potentially exposing both airports and an entire plane to the virus. Despite this, Florida officials released all passengers without requiring isolation or testing.[175]
  • Ohio: A fourth case, and the first instace of community spread, was confirmed by Governor DeWine in Stark County.[176]
  • Oklahoma: NBA player Rudy Gobert tested positive for COVID-19 prior to the game between the Utah Jazz and the Oklahoma City Thunder at Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City. The game was postponed and the NBA announced that the 2019–20 NBA season would be suspended.
  • Oregon: OHA confirmed four new cases, one new case each in Polk, Marion, Umatilla and Deschutes counties.[177] They later announced Linn County’s first two presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 [178]
  • South Dakota: Three presumptive positive cases, bringing state total to eight.[179]
  • Texas: Houston mayor Sylvester Turner announced cancellation of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo after declaring the outbreak as a public health emergency.[180] The first possible case of community spread was announced the same day, in a patient who had not traveled out of the state.[181] Lakewood Church in Houston, one of the nation’s biggest mega-churches announced it was canceling in-person services till further notice.[182]
  • Virginia: The University of Virginia in Charlottesville announced that classes will be moved online beginning on March 19 "for the forseeable future, quite possibly through the end of the semester" on May 17.[183][184] Furthermore, administrators issued a blanket prohibition on "events with more than 100 people," saying that such events "should be postponed, cancelled, or offered virtually," a policy similar that of the University of California, Los Angeles, which suspended on-campus classes on March 10.[185] The closure followed closely on the heels of the first confirmed case of coronavirus in Central Virginia in a teenager from Hanover County near Richmond who returned from international travel "to a country...[with] a Level 3 alert" on March 8. The teenager was reported to be "doing well" in isolation at home, and Hanover County Public Schools confirmed that the teenager is not a current student attending a public school in that county.[186]
  • Wisconsin: The University of Wisconsin–Green Bay announced that classes will be moved to "alternative delivery methods" going into effect immediately after spring break on March 23 and will continue until further notice.[187] The University of Wisconsin–Madison announced a suspension of all in-person classes from March 23 to April 10.[188]

March 12

Total US cases passed 1,500 today. More universities and colleges transitioned to online attendance across the country. Public school closures were announced in Arkansas, Connecticut, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Mexico, Ohio, Utah, Virginia and Washington state. Georgia reported its first death and Washington state reported 2 additional deaths. This brought the total US deaths to 40 (31 WA, 4 CA, 2 FL, 1 NJ, 1 SD, 1 GA).

Most major sports leagues, including MLS, the NHL, and the National Lacrosse League, announced the suspension of their seasons that are already in progress. The XFL prematurely terminates its inaugural season, while Major League Baseball announces the cancellation of all remaining spring training games and delays the start of their 2020 season. In addition, the NCAA cancels all postseason tournaments in their winter and spring sports, which includes the men's and women's basketball tournaments, as well as the baseball and softball tournaments. The cancellation of the basketball tournament marks the first time the tournament will not be held due to unforeseen circumstances.

  • Alabama: Despite having no recorded cases in the state, the University of Alabama System as well as Auburn University both announce they are transitioning to online remote attendance when courses resume from spring break.[189][190]
  • Alaska: State officials announce the first positive case of coronavirus in the state.[191]
  • Arkansas: Five more presumptive cases are reported, prompting the governor to order school closings in Saline, Jefferson, Pulaski and Grant counties.[192]
  • California: Walt Disney Parks & Resorts announced the Disneyland Resort would close on March 14.[193]
  • Connecticut: A number of school districts announced closures beginning on March 13 through at least March 27, including those in the cities of Bridgeport, New Haven, and Stamford, among several others.[194]
  • Delaware: Governor John Carney declared a state of emergency following the announcement of three more cases, connected with the University of Delaware.
  • Georgia: The state of Georgia reported its first death related to the pandemic, according to statement from the governor's office. [195] A dining facility worker at Moody Air Force Base, near Valdosta, tested positive for the virus prompting temporary closure of the facility for cleaning.[196] Emory University became the first state college to close campus and move classes online for the remainder of the semester.[197] The University System of Georgia announced that its 26 public institutions will remain open based on the current advice of the Georgia Department of Public Health.[198]
  • Indiana: Went from 11 to 12 cases. Gov. Holcomb Announces New Steps to Protect Public. [199]
  • Louisiana: Grambling State University announces travel restrictions to prevent the coronavirus from spreading.[200]
  • Maine: Maine governor Janet Mills announced the state's first confirmed case of the virus, a woman in her 50's in Androscoggin County. The woman is said to be quarantined inside her home. [201]
  • Maryland: Governor Larry Hogan ordered the closure of all schools for two weeks, starting Monday, March 16, and the cancelling of all gatherings of 250 people or more. [202]
  • Michigan: 10 new cases were confirmed, bringing the total cases in the state to 12.[203]
  • Minnesota: The Minnesota Department of Health has confirmed nine total cases in the state, affecting Anoka, Carver, Dakota, Hennepin, Olmsted, Ramsey, and Stearns counties.[204]
  • New Mexico: All public schools in the state will be closed for 3 weeks starting Monday, March 16. [205]
  • New York: Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that all Broadway theatres have been ordered to shut down at 5:00 p.m. that day, and that public gatherings in congregate spaces with more than 500 people will be prohibited beginning at 5:00 p.m. on March 13. The legal capacity of any venue with a capacity of 500 people or less will also be reduced by half to discourage large gatherings.[206]
  • Utah: Governor Gary Herbert recommended that all gathering of more than 100 should be cancelled for the next two weeks. All colleges and universities in the state announced that all classes would be moved online for the remainder of the semester. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, which has a large number of members in Utah[207], announced that all gatherings would be cancelled worldwide until further notice. [208][209]
  • Virginia: Governor Ralph Northam declared a state of emergency and cancelled out-of-state travel for public employees, after the state's total cases doubled since the last update. Several public school districts, including Loudoun County, Prince William County, and Stafford County suspended classes.[210]

Government response

Federal

'President Trump and Members of the Coronavirus Task Force Hold a News Conference' – video from White House, February 26, 2020

As the COVID-19 outbreak began, the federal government faced the crisis with a diminished capacity to respond.[211] After Donald Trump took office in January 2017, his administration had been slow to fill positions related to, planning for, and responding to pandemics. In April 2017, the Washington Post reported, "There is no permanent director at the CDC or at the U.S. Agency for International Development. At the Department of Health and Human Services, no one has been named to fill sub-Cabinet posts for health, global affairs, or preparedness and response."[212] The following year, "the Trump administration fired the government’s entire pandemic response chain of command, including the White House management infrastructure."[211][213][214]

As of February, the CDC was urging local governments, businesses, and schools to develop plans like canceling mass gatherings or switching to teleworking to be ready when the need arises. Their directive included having communication plans between communities, businesses, and employees, and planning for continued business operations in the face of increased absenteeism or disrupted supply chains. On February 25, the director of the CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said at a news conference that "we expect we will see community spread [of the virus] in this country."[215] "We are asking the American public to prepare for the expectation that this might be bad ... Disruption to everyday life might be severe."[216] In contrast, Larry Kudlow, the White House National Economic Council Director, said in an interview with CNBC that “We have contained this. I won’t say airtight, but pretty close to airtight. We have done a good job in the United States,"[217][218] and President Trump told reporters during a news conference in India that the disease is "very well under control in our country" and added "I think the whole situation will start working out".[216] This came after Trump's comments earlier in February proposing a theory that the coronavirus "goes away in April with the heat."[219]

On February 27, reports emerged regarding a whistleblower report that alleged that United States Department of Health and Human Services "officials dispatched more than a dozen workers to aid quarantined Americans evacuated from China, without providing proper training or protective gear — a move that potentially exposed them to the coronavirus infection."[220][221][221][222][223]

Preparedness

In January 2019, a U.S. Senate Committee had warned that the U.S. and the world was vulnerable to a flu pandemic or large-scale outbreak of a contagious disease, which could severely affect the world economy.[224] Lisa Monaco, a former Homeland Security Advisor, considers a pandemic disease like the coronavirus, a threat to national security and among the top threats facing the country.[225] She had previously stated that because deadly diseases are only one flight away, "the U.S. government must start taking preparedness seriously."[226]

Alex Azar signing a public health emergency declaration

On February 25, American health authorities including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reported that they expected the virus to spread in the United States and they urged local governments, schools, and businesses to develop plans such as canceling mass gatherings or switching to teleworking.[8] On March 7, CDC officials warned that widespread transmission may force large numbers of people to seek hospitalization and other healthcare, which may overload healthcare systems. They also said that workers may stay away from childcare centers, schools, and workplaces.[9] Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy, who is on the Senate committee that oversees healthcare, stressed that local governments will need assistance from the federal government if severity of the disease results in school and business closures. He admonished Congress for "talking about industry bailouts and tax cuts [rather than] talking about assistance for average Americans." [227]

At a presentation for a discussion of preparedness hosted by the American Hospital Association one expert said, "I don't think we can appreciate, based on what we've seen in our lifetimes, how big [this is] going to be. [...] It will stretch our capacity to provide healthcare overall in the US." Another expert projected there could be as many as 96 million cases with 480,000 deaths and 4.8 million hospitalizations.[228] The WHO estimates that 1 in every 5 cases will require hospitalization.[229] The U.S. currently has a total of 924,107 staffed beds in all its hospitals,[230] with 94,837 ICU beds.[231] Based on the Chinese model, the median time from onset to recovery for mild cases is two weeks.[232]

Medical equipment

In February it was announced that the United States would invoke the 1950 Defense Production Act to boost production of protective gear for SARS-CoV-2.[233] On February 13, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced, “As of today, I can announce that the CDC has begun working with health departments in five cities to use its flu surveillance network to begin testing individuals with flu-like symptoms for the Chinese coronavirus. This effort will help see whether there is a broader spread than we have been able to detect so far.” However, The Washington Post reported that the virus test kits had not been properly made and did not give accurate readings thus rendering them useless, and the state health departments had not been informed of the federal government's plans.[234] On February 28, Science reported that the World Health Organization (WHO) supplied testing kits to 57 countries but for reasons unknown, the U.S. decided to make their own. They report that the early tests issued by the CDC were a "fiasco" because they contained a faulty reagent. Science also criticized the CDC guidelines that specified who was or was not appropriate to test for the virus saying, "In what is already an infamous snafu, CDC initially refused a request to test a patient in Northern California who turned out to be the first probable COVID19 case without known links to an infected person."[235]

Speaking at a CDC conference in Atlanta, Georgia on March 6, President Trump said, "Anybody that needs a test, gets a test. They’re there. They have the tests. And the tests are beautiful."[236]

On March 2 (Monday), Vice President Mike Pence said that more than a million COVID-19 test kits would be distributed nationwide over the coming week.[237] On March 4, Stephen Hahn, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, estimated that “by the end of this week, close to a million tests will be able to be performed" and Vice President Mike Pence promised that “roughly 1.5 million tests” would be available by the end of the week. On March 6, Pence moved the goal to the following week, when he predicted kits for 1.2 million people would be made available.[238] Speaking at a CDC conference in Atlanta, Georgia on March 6, President Trump claimed, "Anybody that needs a test, gets a test. They’re there. They have the tests. And the tests are beautiful."[236]

Speaking on Face the Nation on March 8, Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy was asked, "How many cases do you think there are right now [in Connecticut]? There are two that have been reported." Murphy replied, "Oh, listen, I imagine we have hundreds, if not thousands of cases in my state. I think we have no concept of the scope of this epidemic yet because we have not been able to test." Murphy said they were doing some testing using private labs but they had not yet received any of the kits the administration said would be delivered nationwide on March 6.[227] In a Senate hearing Representative Stephen Lynch said that they had not yet received the promised kits in Massachusetts. He confronted Anthony Fauci, the director the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, who was present at the news conference in which Trump announced that the promised test kits had been delivered. He questioned Fauci about President Trump's "bizarre statements" such as his repeated claims that the tests are available and are "perfect" and "beautiful." He admonished Fauci saying, "When the president is making statements like this, we need pushback from the public health officials. Standing behind him and nodding silently or an eye roll every once in awhile is not going to get us there." Fauci replied, "I have never held back on exactly what is going on from a public health standpoint."[239]

On March 12 during a House Oversight Committee hearing on the Trump administration's preparedness and response, Florida Representative Debbie Wasserman Schultz, asked Fauci why health-care workers and others were being denied tests by their local health officials, who have been citing CDC protocol. Fauci explained a complicated distribution system and said, “The system is not geared toward what we need right now, what you are asking for. That is a failing. Let’s admit it. The idea of anybody getting it easily the way people in other countries are doing it? We’re not set up for that. Should we be? Yes, but we’re not.”[240] Speaking on the PBS News Hour, Ashish Jha commented on Fauci's statements:

"Well, of course, Dr. Tony Fauci is right. It has been a failing. And what your viewers need to understand is, if you get sick tomorrow with coronavirus, and you reach out to your doctor or you talk to your doctor, and your doctor wants to test you for coronavirus, he or she can't. Most doctors today cannot test people for coronavirus, because we just don't have the tests. Every other major country has figured out how to do it. South Korea is testing 15,000 people a day. Across the European Union, people are getting tests. Even Iran and Vietnam are testing more regularly than we are. We have just managed to bungle this so incredibly badly that most Americans cannot get the test they need. And, as Dr. Fauci said, it's a failing."[241]

Charges of mismanagement

Due to lack of testing capacity and lack of guidelines for who gets tested, by February 26 only a small group of people were being tested: those who had been in contact with a person who was confirmed to have the virus or someone who had recently traveled to China. In an investigative report which looked into the reasons for the slow reaction to the spread of the virus, a March 7 Politico article claimed that President Trump's aides had discouraged briefing the president about the coronavirus as early as January because Trump had "created an atmosphere where the judgment of his staff is that he shouldn’t need to know these things.” Politico reports that as the threat grew, Trump "[became] attached to the daily count of coronavirus cases and how the United States compares to other nations, reiterating that he wants the U.S. numbers kept as low as possible." Politico writes that Health officials obliged the President by mentioning only the most optimistic outcomes in briefings, tamped down on promised transparency, and no longer detailed the number of people who have been tested. As a result, the CDC's online figures are running well behind the number of U.S. cases tracked by Johns Hopkins and the European Union’s estimate of U.S. cases.[242] On March 9, the United States remains still limited in its capacity to test people for the illness.[243] Sophisticated modelling of the outbreak suggests that the number of cases in China would have been many times higher without interventions such as early detection, isolation of the infected, and travel restrictions. “From a purely scientific standpoint, putting in place a combination of interventions as early as possible is the best way to slow spread and reduce outbreak size,” said Prof Andrew Tatem at the University of Southampton. “Of the three types of intervention we looked at, the early detection and isolation of cases likely had the strongest impact, and this is something that seems to have been in place early and been done effectively in the UK compared to other countries, such as the US,” Tatem said.[244] In a joint statement the Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi criticized the president for not addressing the lack of testing kits: “We have a public health crisis in this country and the best way to help keep the American people safe and ensure their economic security is for the president to focus on fighting the spread of the coronavirus itself. Alarmingly, the president did not say how the administration will address the lack of coronavirus testing kits throughout the United States.” They noted that they will urge Republicans to back a bill that includes provisions for free coronavirus testing, paid emergency leave and food assistance.[245]

Trump administration statements

Trump states "The risk to the American people remains very low." - video from White House

On February 26, Trump insisted that the "risk to the American people remains very low", and that: "We're very, very ready for this, for anything".[246] Trump remarked: "I don't think it's inevitable" that the coronavirus would spread within the country, contradicting his own health officials.[247][248] He also criticized media outlets for making the "Caronavirus [sic] look as bad as possible, including panicking [financial] markets".[219] Also on February 26, Vice-President Mike Pence was appointed by Trump to take charge of the nation's response to the virus.[249] The move received criticism from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who "expressed concern over Vice President Mike Pence's track record as Indiana governor on public health."[250] Pence's office issued instructions requiring senior officials to obtain approval from Pence's office before issuing any statements about the epidemic.[251] The administration explained this as ensuring messaging would be consistent, but many scientists and public health officials objected on the grounds that this would slow down the process of spreading accurate information.[251] The Wall Street Journal noted that "The directive follows Mr. Trump's frustration with messaging he felt was overly alarmist," and that it "came amid a sharp drop in the stock market in recent days on coronavirus fears, and after health officials had warned Americans to be prepared for a possible outbreak."[251]

On February 28, Trump spoke at a rally where he described the coronavirus as the "new hoax" of the Democrats. A day later, Trump said he actually meant that the "hoax" was Democrats blaming his administration for their response when "we've done such a good job".[252]

Trump asks about a "solid flu vaccine" - video from White House

On March 2, Trump held a meeting with his federal response team and key members of pharmaceutical companies. Trump asked if "a solid flu vaccine" would also work as a coronavirus vaccine, and was told that it would not work. Trump also pressed for the companies to have a vaccine ready for the public within "a couple of months", but was told by Dr. Anthony Fauci (the leader of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) that it would take at least 1-1.5 years. After the meeting, Trump proceeded to tell the media that he heard that a vaccine would be available in possibly "a matter of months — and I've heard pretty much a year would be an outside number".[253] Also on March 2, the CDC removed from its website its count of the number of people tested for the coronavirus in the U.S.[254]

On March 4, Trump spoke on the Hannity program where he suggested that "hundreds of thousands of people" can recover from the coronavirus by "sitting around and even going to work". However, the CDC advises sick people to "not go to work, school, or public areas", while those displaying symptoms of the coronavirus should inform healthcare professionals.[255] The Utah Coronavirus Task Force labelled Trump's comment as "misinformation", stating that even for infected people with "very mild symptoms, going to work sick could be dangerous to others".[256]

Also on March 4, Trump blamed the Obama administration for supposedly instituting a rule which slowed down testing during the coronavirus outbreak.[257] According to experts, there was no such rule that was implemented by the Obama administration.[258][259] ProPublica reported on February 28 that the slow testing was actually due to the CDC rejecting internationally-used World Health Organization COVID-19 test guidelines and instead trying to develop a test of its own; that test turned out to be unreliable, and most laboratories were not allowed to test until February 26.[260]

The Associated Press reported on March 8 that the White House overruled a CDC recommendation that elderly and physically fragile Americans refrain from commercial air travel.[261]

Oval Office address

Trump addressing the nation: "Earlier this week, I met with the leaders of health insurance industry who have agreed to waive all copayments for coronavirus treatments, extend insurance coverage to these treatments, and to prevent surprise medical billing."

In an address to the nation on March 11, 2020, hours after world health officials declared the coronavirus a pandemic, President Trump stated that insurance companies in the United States "have agreed to waive all copayments for coronavirus treatments". A public relations person for the America's Health Insurance Plans stated that this was inaccurate, and that insurance companies will only waive copayments for testing, not treatment[262].

Trump said: "We will suspend all travel from Europe to the United States for the next 30 days." But the measure would not apply to Great Britain, despite it having a higher caseload than some other European countries.[263] Trump argued the European Union “failed to take the same precautions and restrict travel from China and other hotspots. As a result, a large number of new clusters in the United States were seeded by travelers from Europe.” He framed the COVID-19 as a ″Foreign Virus″. Trump spoke little of the spread of the virus within the United States, where at that time more than 1,300 people had fallen ill and 38 people had died.[264][265][263][266][267]

Later, the Department of Homeland Security specified Trump's imprecise statements "Europe" and "EU" in the corresponding proclamation, the entry ban will apply to travelers who were in one of the 26 Schengen states in the last 14 days: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland. The EU states not belonging to Schengen, i.e. Ireland, Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Cyprus were not affected.[268]

Congressional funding

Trump, with Azar, signs the Coronavirus Preparedness and Response Supplemental Appropriations Act into law on March 6, 2020

On February 24, 2020, the Trump administration asked Congress for $2.5 billion in emergency funding to combat the outbreak.[269] On the same day, President Trump, while travelling on official business in India, tweeted that "The Coronavirus is very much under control in the USA. We are in contact with everyone and all relevant countries."[270] The Republican chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Richard Shelby of Alabama, criticized the $2.5 billion as a "low ball" request.[271] Shortly after the Trump administration requested the $2.5 billion, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer unveiled a plan for "$8.5 billion in emergency funding to combat the coronavirus."[272] Schumer's proposal was criticized by House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who stated "Just picking a number out of a hat like that never seems to work properly. I would like to know what the experts believe they need, make sure we fund that."[250] As of February 26, McCarthy "said appropriators were looking at about $4 billion, saying he believes $2 billion is not enough."[250] A February 27 report, however, stated that Congressional "[l]awmakers are discussing a spending package that would provide between $6 billion to $8 billion to combat the coronavirus."[273]

By March 4, 2020, Congress had reached a bipartisan agreement for $8.3 billion in new funding to fight the coronavirus.[274] The deal included "more than $3 billion for the research and development of vaccines, therapeutics and diagnostics, as well as $2.2 billion for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including $950 million to support state and local health agencies."[274] The $8.3 billion exceeds the new funding the Trump administration had requested, "with lawmakers on both sides of the aisle alarmed by what they deemed as the president’s paltry request to fight the bug amid criticism that his administration bungled its response and failed to keep the American people clued in about the potential severity of the outbreak."[274] The bill "passed the House overwhelmingly, with just two Republicans voting against it and 415 members supporting it."[275] On March 5, 2020, the bill passed the Senate by a 96-1 vote, with 3 Senators not voting.[276] On March 6, 2020, President Trump signed the bill into law.[277]

Travel and entry restrictions

The CDC has active level 3 travel advisories for China, most of Europe, Iran, and South Korea, recommending against non-essential travel to these regions.[278][279][280][281][282]

As of March 11, the CDC has issued a level 2 advisory that applies worldwide, recommending against any non-essential travel by older adults or anyone with a serious chronic condition.[283][284]

Data obtained by CNN from the US Department of Homeland Security indicated that 241 foreign persons had been denied entry to the United States between February 2 and March 3, including 14 at airports and 227 at land-based ports of entry. An additional 106 foreign persons had been denied entry at preclearance facilities outside the United States.[285] Public Safety Canada reported that 70 Canadian citizens and 47 permanent residents, all non-U.S. persons, were denied entry into the United States through March 2.[286]

China

Americans returning from Hubei province are required to undergo health screenings and submit to a mandatory quarantine and monitoring for up to 14 days.[287] On February 16, 14 evacuees from the luxury cruise ship the Diamond Princess were flown on State Department-chartered planes from Japan to the United States.[288] The CDC "did not want 14 people who had tested positive for the new coronavirus to be flown back to the US, among hundreds of other uninfected people—but the CDC experts were overruled by officials at the US State Department."[288]

Iran

As of March 2, foreign nationals who have traveled to Iran within the last 14 days are denied permission to travel to the United States.[289] US citizens and permanent residents returning to the United States who have traveled to Iran within the previous 14 days must enter through an approved airport.[289]

Europe

On March 11, 2020, a presidential proclamation was issued to suspend incoming travel by foreign nationals who have been to a country within the European Union's Schengen Area (an area of 26 European states with no border control for those travelling within them;[290] this excludes the United Kingdom and roughly nineteen other European countries, such as Albania, Belarus, Bulgaria, Croatia, Ireland, and Romania) in the last 14 days, for 30 days beginning at 23:59 ET on March 13.[291] The ban does not apply to legal permanent residents and most immediate family members of U.S. citizens.[291] Cargo and trading goods are not affected.[292][293]

State, territorial, and local response

Disinfection of New York City Subway cars against coronavirus

Arkansas

On March 11, Governor Asa Hutchinson declared a public health emergency in response to the first presumptive case in the state. On March 12, The governor ordered school closings in Saline, Jefferson, Pulaski and Grant counties until March 30.[155][192]

California

On March 4th, Governor Gavin Newsome declared a State of Emergency in California after a California man died falling ill on a cruise ship.[294]

Colorado

Connecticut

On March 10, Governor Ned Lamont declared a public health emergency after two residents tested positive for coronavirus.[295]

Delaware

On March 12, Governor John Carney declared a state of emergency following three more confirmed cases.

Florida

Georgia

On March 9, Governor Brian Kemp announced the preparation of a state park located in Morgan County as a quarantine destination for diagnosed individuals.[296] On March 10, a coronavirus patient from Cherokee County, who didn't need hospitalization but lacked adequate quarantine conditions at home, became the first to be relocated to Hard Labor Creek State Park.[297]

Hawaii

On March 4, Governor David Ige declared a state of emergency until April 29.[298]

Illinois

On March 9, Governor J. B. Pritzker issued a disaster proclamation, the state's equivalent to a state of emergency, as four new cases were announced in the state.[299] The same day, Loyola Academy in Wilmette canceled classes due to potential exposure of a student to the virus.[300]

Indiana

On March 6, Governor Eric Holcomb declared a public health emergency due to the first positive Indiana case.[301] Also on the 6, Tippecanoe County declared a public health alert as testing for the virus started,[302] which was upgraded to a public health emergency on the 9th over a positive case.[303]

On March 8, Eli Lilly and Company advised employees to work from home if at all possible, to help stop the spread of the coronavirus.[304] On March 9, Hickory Elementary School in Hendricks County closed for 2 weeks after a student tested positive for the virus.[113] Avon Community School Corporation later closed all Avon schools until March 20 after a second student showed symptoms.[305]

On March 10, Indiana University announced classes at all campuses would be taught remotely for two weeks starting March 23, following spring break. In-person classes would potentially resume on April 6.[306] On the same day, Purdue University announces all classes to be held online starting March 23 and potentially through the end of the semester.[307] On March 11, the University of Notre Dame announced classes would be taught online starting March 23 through at least April 13, and classes would be cancelled the week of April 15 to allow time to transition classes to an online format.[164] That same day, Ball State University announced that, starting March 15, classes would transition to online only until April 30.

Maryland

On March 5, Governor Larry Hogan declared a state of emergency after the first three cases of coronavirus were confirmed in his state.[63][308] The University of Maryland, College Park; University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Towson University; and Salisbury University have all canceled classes after break with the latter three canceling classes the week of March 8 as well.[citation needed]

On March 12, the Alhambra Catholic Invitational Tournament for basketball scheduled to be held at Frostburg State University was cancelled.[309]

On March 12, Governor Larry Hogan declared all Maryland public schools were to be closed from March 16 through March 27, gatherings of more than 250 people were banned, and the national guard was activated to a higher state of readiness. [310]

Massachusetts

Michigan

On February 3, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services activated its Community Health Emergency Coordination Center to manage the state government's response to coronavirus.[311] On February 28, the State Emergency Operations Center was activated by Governor Gretchen Whitmer to assist with coordination.[312] On March 3, the Governor created four COVID-19 Task Forces: State Operations, Health and Human Services, Education, and Economy/Workforce.[313] As of March 11, the University of Michigan, Western Michigan University, Wayne State University, Michigan Technological University, Northern Michigan University, and Central Michigan University had various restrictions on students and faculty in response to the virus.[314][315][316]

Minnesota

On March 10, Minnesota approved $20.8 million from the general fund to the public health response contingency account. That's in addition to $4.6 million already in the account, making for just over $25 million to support virus investigation, outbreak monitoring, public information, statewide response coordination and lab analysis.[317]

The University of Minnesota canceled in-person classes at all five of its campuses through at least April 1, moving to online learning starting next week due to concerns over the coronavirus outbreak.[318]

Nevada

On March 5, the Clark County School District in Nevada canceled all out of state trips for all schools in the area. CCSD said that they took this action for “an abundance of caution.” CCSD also reported that they will be rescheduling all the trips that were canceled.[319]

Then on March 12, CCSD canceled extra activity classes for all schools as well, however regular classes are to continue still.[320]

New Jersey

Several schools and school districts announced closings or schedule modifications by the 8th due to the impact of the virus.[321] On March 9, Governor Phil Murphy declared a state of emergency.[322] On March 10, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Seton Hall, Stevens Institute of Technology, The College of New Jersey, and Monmouth University announced that all of their classes will be switched into an online format.[323]

New Mexico

On March 11, Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham declared a state of emergency. [324]

New York

North Carolina

On March 10, Governor Roy Cooper declared a state of emergency after five more cases tested presumptive positive on March 9.[325] On March 11, the University of North Carolina system announced that it would suspend in-person classes on March 20.[326] Duke University also cancelled all on-campus classes the same day.[327] On March 12, hours after Governor Cooper requested that events of 100 people or more be postponed or cancelled, organizers called off the 73rd annual North Carolina Azalea Festival.[328]

Ohio

On March 9, Governor Mike DeWine declared a state of emergency.[329] That evening, The Ohio State University moved all in-person classes to an online format until at least March 30.[132] On March 12, Mike DeWine announced that all schools from K-12 will be closed for a 3-week break, starting March 16.[330]

The Ohio government despite having only five confirmed cases, predicts that there are over 100,000 cases in the state.[331]

Oregon

On February 28, Governor Kate Brown created a coronavirus response team "tasked with coordinating state- and local-level preparations for an epidemic" of coronavirus in Oregon. "[C]omposed of directors or other representatives of 12 state agencies," the response team will "keep the governor posted on the coronavirus situation internationally and give her advice on how to protect the public."[332]

Texas

Empty shelves that held toilet paper at the Sams Club in Lufkin, Texas, on March 11, 2020.

On March 2, San Antonio Mayor Ron Nirenberg and Bexar County both declared a "local state of disaster and a public health emergency" after an individual was mistakenly released from quarantine at Joint Base San Antonio by the CDC before a third test for coronavirus returned a positive result.[333] The city subsequently petitioned the US government to extend the quarantine of US nationals at Joint Base San Antonio; the petition was denied by Judge Xavier Rodriguez in the United States District Court for the Western District of Texas.[334][335]

Washington

Washington, D.C.

On March 11, mayor Muriel Bowser issued a state of emergency, and recommended against any non-essential gatherings of more than 1000 people.[336][337]

Wisconsin

The Osceola School District closed schools on March 10, to sanitize the buildings and buses after a person who attended a regional sports tournament was found to be infected.[338]

Economic impact

Domestic travel

External video
CNBC interview with Southwest CEO Gary Kelly on March 5, YouTube video
KOMO: Coronavirus Impact on Air Travel, YouTube video

As the outbreak intensified, demand for domestic air travel declined steeply. By March 4, U.S. airlines, including United Airlines and JetBlue Airways, began to reduce their domestic flight schedules, offering voluntary unpaid leave to personnel, and freezing hiring.[339][340] In an interview with CNBC on March 5, Southwest Airlines CEO Gary Kelly reported "a very noticeable, precipitous decline in bookings" since the outbreak began, remarking that the outbreak's impact on domestic air travel had "a 9/11-like feel" reminiscent of an economic recession.[341][342][343] On March 10, American Airlines and Delta Air Lines also announced cuts to their domestic flight schedules, while United Airlines reported that it expects to take a loss in the first quarter of 2020 rather than profits that the carrier previously expected. Furthermore, United Airlines announced $2.5 billion in reductions to capital spending, while Delta Air Lines reported that it planned to defer $500 million in capital spending as well as retire portions of its fleet ahead of schedule.[344] Globally, the International Air Transport Association estimated that the global outbreak could reduce airline revenues by between $63 billion and $113 billion, including nearly $21 billion in the US and Canada.[345][346][347]

On March 8, Amtrak suspended its three daily non-stop high-speed Acela Express trains between Washington, D.C., and New York City beginning on March 10 and continuing until May 26, citing "reduced demand for our service."[348][349][350] The same day, Amtrak announced that on March 4, one of its passengers on train 303 (Chicago to St. Louis) had tested positive, the first such case on the U.S. rail system. Amtrak took the train out of service, disinfected the St. Louis and Chicago stations, and notified the other passengers on that train.[351]

Event cancellations

As "social distancing" entered the public lexicon, emergency management leaders encouraged the cancellation of large gatherings in order to slow the rate of infection.[citation needed]

On March 4, Starbucks announced that it will not fill reusable cups at its US and Canadian stores during the ongoing COVID-19 outbreak.[352]

On February 21, Verizon pulled out of an RSA conference, joining the ranks of AT&T Cybersecurity and IBM.[353]

On February 29, the American Physical Society cancelled its annual March Meeting, scheduled for March 2 to 6 in Denver, Colorado, even though many of the more than 11,000 physicist participants had already arrived and participated in the day's pre-conference events.[354]

Technology conferences such as E3 2020,[355] Facebook F8, Google I/O and Cloud Next,[356] Microsoft's MVP Summit[357][358] have been either cancelled or replaced in-person events with internet streaming events.

On March 6, the annual South by Southwest (SXSW) conference and festival scheduled to run from March 13 to 22 in Austin, Texas, were cancelled following after the city government declared a "local disaster" and ordered conferences to shut down for the first time in 34 years.[359][360] The cancellation is not covered by insurance.[361][362] In 2019, 73,716 people attended the conferences and festivals, directly spending $200 million and ultimately boosting the local economy by $356 million, or 4 percent of the annual revenue of the region's hospitality and tourism economic sectors.[363][364]

After the cancellations of the Ultra Music Festival in Miami and SXSW in Austin, speculation began to grow about the Coachella festival set to begin on April 10 in the desert near Palm Springs, California.[365][366] The annual festival, which has attracted some 125,000 people over two consecutive weekends, is insured only in the event of a force majeure cancellation such as one ordered by local or state government officials. Estimates on an insurance payout range from $150 million to $200 million.[367] On March 10, event organizers announced the festival had been postponed to October.

In March 2020, a number of studio-based television programs, including all of Disney-ABC Domestic Television's New York-based talk shows (such as Live with Kelly and Ryan, The View, and Strahan, Sara and Keke), Dr. Phil, and the game shows Jeopardy! and Wheel of Fortune,[368] announced that they would perform tapings without studio audiences until further notice as a precaution. All New York City-based late-night talk shows have also done so.[369] The DNC similarly announced that it would not allow an audience or outside press at an upcoming democratic candidates' debate in Phoenix on March 15. Warner Bros. Television stated that it would still allow audiences for its tapings (such as The Ellen DeGeneres Show, NBC's music competition The Voice, and the season finale of The Bachelor), but would require audience members to certify their condition, including that they have not traveled to or through CDC level 3-designated countries within the past three weeks.[370][371][372]

Educational closures

A large number of higher educational institutions canceled classes and closed dormitories in response to the outbreak, including Harvard University, Cornell University, and the University of South Carolina.[373][374][375]

Additionally, a variety of school systems closed in response to the outbreak. Seattle Public Schools closed for two weeks in order to halt the spread.[376] In Georgia, the Fulton County School System closed for at least two days after two employees tested positively for coronavirus.[377]

Financial markets

Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell announces a 50 basis point (0.5% percentage point) interest rate cut on March 3, 2020 in light of "evolving risks to economic activity" from the coronavirus

On February 27, 2020, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) dropped 1,191 points, the largest point drop in the index's history; some attributed the drop to anxiety about the epidemic.[378] The same day, the S&P 500 logged a 4.4% decline.[379] The six business days it took for the S&P 500 Index to drop 10% (from February 20 to 27) "marked the quickest 10% decline from an all-time high in the index’s history."[379] From January 21 to March 1, the DJIA dropped more than 3,500 points, roughly a 13% decrease.[380][381]

On March 3, 2020, the Federal Reserve lowered target interest rates from 1.75% to 1.25%,[382] the largest emergency rate cut since the 2008 global financial crisis,[383] in an attempt to counteract the outbreak's effect on the American economy. "The coronavirus poses evolving risks to economic activity," the Federal Reserve said in a statement. "In light of these risks and in support of achieving its maximum employment and price stability goals, the Federal Open Market Committee decided today to lower the target range for the federal funds rate."[384]

On March 9, 2020, President Donald Trump announced that he would be inviting Wall Street executives to the White House to discuss the economic impact of the virus.[385]

Corporate revenue and earnings

In February 2020, American companies, including Apple Inc. and Microsoft, began lowering expectations for revenue because of supply chain disruptions in China caused by the virus.[386] In a February 27 note to clients, Goldman Sachs stated that it expects no earnings growth for U.S. companies in 2020 as a result of the virus, at a time when the consensus forecast of Wall Street expected "earnings to climb 7%."[387]

Solutions implemented

On March 3, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell announced a 0.5 percentage point (50 basis point) interest rate cut in light of "evolving risks to economic activity" from the coronavirus. The Fed announced on March 12 that it would also expand its purchases of bonds and other measures valued at $1.5 trillion, to inject money into the banking system.[388]

Solutions proposed

Writing in The New York Times, economist Ian Golden recommended: "Banks, supported by governments, should provide discounted loans and increase their tolerance of late repayments by businesses that risk bankruptcy because of the absence of supplies or customers, or because of late payments by creditors." He also recommended that: "government should help employers to guarantee a basic income and to ensure that workers who are not currently entitled to sick pay — a quarter of the U.S. work force — are covered for the period in which they are unable to work.[389]

Impact on sports

On March 7, 2020, the Riverside County Public Health Department declared a public health emergency after a patient tested positive for COVID-19 in the area. In response to the declaration, organizers announced the postponement of the 2020 Indian Wells Masters tennis tournaments, citing the event's high attendance (which had seen around 450,000 in 2018 and 2019) as creating a health risk.[390] The ATP Tour and WTA Tour have both suspended competition until late-April, which has also led to the cancellation of the Miami Open.[391]

WWE has not announced any plans to cancel or postpone WrestleMania 36—the 2020 edition of its flagship professional wrestling show—which is scheduled for Tampa's Raymond James Stadium on April 5, 2020. As of March 12, Hillsborough County emergency officials have provisionally allowed the event to occur.[392] Company executives stated in February 2020 that they were monitoring the situation, citing that the health and safety of both its performers and fans were a high priority.[393][394] It did, however, cancel a broadcast of its weekly television series Friday Night SmackDown, moving it from Little Caesars Arena in Detroit to WWE's Performance Center wrestling school in Orlando, with no studio audience.[395] In addition, All Elite Wrestling announced that it would postpone several weeks of scheduled live broadcasts of Dynamite and replace them with shows broadcast from a limited amount of venues without spectators being admitted.

On March 12, NASCAR announced only essential personnel would be admitted to events.[396] The junior United States Hockey League suspended their 2019-20 season on March 12.[397]

The PGA Tour has continued on with events, such as the 2020 Players Championship that began on March 12, but they will be closed to spectators for at least one month.[398]

Professional sports leagues

Four of North America's major professional sports leagues—the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Hockey League (NHL), Major League Baseball (MLB), and Major League Soccer (MLS)—jointly announced on March 9 that they would all restrict media access to player facilities (such as locker rooms) to control possible exposure.[399]

Most regions of the San Francisco Bay Area have instituted bans on large gatherings, which have impacted several teams in the area. The NBA's Golden State Warriors announced that a game against the Brooklyn Nets on March 12 would be played behind closed doors.[400] The NHL's San Jose Sharks and Columbus Blue Jackets announced similar restrictions (with the latter in compliance with a proposed order by Ohio state governor Mike DeWine).[401][402][403]

On March 11, 2020, Utah Jazz center Rudy Gobert was tested positive for coronavirus, a diagnosis that Jazz officials only disclosed shortly before tip-off of their game against the Oklahoma City Thunder. (Ironically, two days earlier, while joking about an earlier NBA proposal to hold games without spectators to prevent potential spread of the disease, Gobert, while unknowingly having possibly already contracted the COVID-19 virus, touched equipment—including microphones—belonging to the media during a press conference after the Jazz's loss to the Toronto Raptors. The Jazz faced some criticism from sports analysts for their timing in disclosing Gobert's positive test, having prevented adequate lead time to postpone the game before additional staff and spectators arrived.) The game was postponed, and Jazz and Thunder players and certain personnel were quarantined inside the game's host stadium, Chesapeake Energy Arena in Oklahoma City, for several hours afterward. Minutes after team officials suspended the Jazz–Thunder game, the NBA subsequently announced that it would indefinitely suspend all play of the current season and NBA G League following the completion of the night's remaining games, in order to evaluate the situation. Teams that had played against the Jazz in the last 10 days were advised to undergo 14 days self-isolation, and a game between the New Orleans Pelicans and Sacramento Kings was also postponed due to one of its referees having recently worked a Utah Jazz game.[404][405][406] On March 12, hours after the disclosure of Gobert's diagnosis, his Utah Jazz teammate, shooting guard Donovan Mitchell was revealed to have also tested positive for the virus.[407] Officials with the Mid-Del School District, serving the Oklahoma City suburbs of Midwest City and Del City, later reported one of the two infected Jazz players—purported to be Mitchell, based on social media photos and posts—had visited and conducted practice at Del City High School two days prior to his diagnosis; although they stated the player was not symptomatic at the time, district officials advised to students and personnel who came in contact with the player to self-monitor for symptoms.[408]

On March 12, the Major League Soccer (MLS) announced a 30-day suspension of play.[409][410] Later that day, the NHL suspended the 2019–20 season indefinitely.[411] MLB would also cancel the remainder of spring training and is expected to delay the start of the regular season.[412] The AHL, XFL, MLR, USL, and NLL have also suspended play, with the XFL prematurely terminating its season.[413]

Collegiate sports

The 2020 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament was scheduled to begin on March 17, 2020 with the "First Four" play-in games in Dayton, Ohio, and conclude with the "Final Four" games, originally scheduled for Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, in early-April.[414] The Ivy League cancelled its men's and women's conference basketball tournaments, and awarded the conference championship (which included a guaranteed qualification for the NCAA tournament) based on regular-season records.[415] The Mid-American Conference (MAC) and Big West went on with their tournaments, but announced that they would be closed to outside spectators.[416][417]

On March 11, the NCAA announced that no outside spectators (beyond staff and "limited family attendance") would be admitted to any event in its winter-semester championships and tournaments, which includes not only the men's and women's Division I basketball tournaments, but other events such as its wrestling championship (which had been scheduled for an NFL venue, US Bank Stadium, for the first time in history), and hockey among others.[418][419][420][421] The NCAA-run National Invitation Tournament (a secondary post-season tournament for teams who did not qualify for the NCAA tournament) is also subject to this measure,[422] while the tertiary College Basketball Invitational was cancelled by its organizer.[423]

Following the NCAA announcement, the ACC, Atlantic 10,[424] Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12,[425] and SEC all announced that the remainder of their respective conference tournaments would be closed to spectators, effective March 12.[414][426][427] However, on March 12, all of the aforementioned conferences, as well as the American Athletic Conference, America East, Big Sky, Conference USA, and the Western Athletic Conference successively announced that their men's basketball tournaments would be scrapped and cancelled immediately, with their regular season champions automatically qualifying for the NCAA tournament. The Big East went on with a single game, but called off the game and tournament at halftime. Furthermore, the Pac-12 has suspended all conference events until further notice.[428][429][430]

On March 12, the NCAA ultimately announced that all winter-semester and spring-semester tournaments and championships for the remainder of the academic year have been cancelled, including the basketball and baseball tournaments; this marks the first time that the men's basketball tournament would not be conducted in its 81-year history.[431]

Several colleges announced that attendance at university athletic events would be temporarily limited to essential personnel such as media, players, coaches, and recruits. These schools included the USC Trojans[432] and UCLA Bruins,[433] both located in Los Angeles, and the Fordham Rams, located in New York City.[434] Others, such as the Washington Huskies, allowed fans who had already purchased tickets to attend events but halted additional sales.[435] Various other NCAA contests were canceled after the visiting team declined to travel to the site of competition.[436] The Ivy League went further and cancelled all spring-semester sports, while leaving continued participation in winter playoff sports up to individual universities; Harvard's men's hockey team forfeited the ECAC playoffs,[437] while Cornell elected to continue behind closed doors.[438][439]

Spread to other countries and territories

North America

On March 6, an Ontario resident who had traveled to Las Vegas, Nevada, tested positive for COVID-19. On March 8, another Ontario resident who had traveled to Colorado tested positive.[440] Another person tested positive after returning to Toronto from Washington, D.C.[441] Also on March 8, a woman from Seattle tested positive in British Columbia.[442] On March 9 an Ontario doctor who had traveled to Hawaii, tested positive for COVID-19.[443]

Central and South America

On March 6, 2020, a 49-year-old woman, a U.S. citizen, tested positive in San José, Costa Rica, after traveling from the U.S.[444]

On March 11, 2020, a woman who had passed away tested positive in Georgetown, Guyana, after traveling from New York City.[445]

Europe

On March 7, 2020, a middle-aged person tested positive in Örebro, Sweden, one week after traveling from the U.S., where he had been exposed to a confirmed case.[446]

Asia

On March 10, 2020, a person tested positive in Beijing, after traveling from the U.S.[447]

Additional information on cases

Number of tests done per day in the United States[448]
‡ Data during this period are pending.

The following numbers are based on CDC data. However, CDC data is incomplete. In most U.S. locations, testing to date had only been performed on symptomatic people with a history of travel to Wuhan or with close contact to such people.[7][449][450] Even some health care personnel, showing all the symptoms of COVID-19 but without the travel history, were denied testing.[451] CDC testing protocols did not include non-travelling patients with no known contact with China until February 28.[452]

The original CDC-developed tests were sent out on February 5. They turned out to be faulty.[453] On February 29, the FDA announced that labs would be allowed to do their own in-house testing immediately, independently of CDC testing, as long as they complete an emergency use authorization (EUA) within 15 days.[453] In Washington, state regulators have told health care workers to stop testing altogether.[454]

As of March 11, the CDC reported that 11,079 specimens had been tested for COVID-19, 3,791 of which were tested by CDC labs, and 7,288 tested by U.S. public health labs.[455]

Current number of non-repatriated cases by state

The CDC publishes official numbers every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, reporting several categories of cases: individual travelers, people who contracted the disease from other people within the U.S., and repatriated citizens who returned to the U.S. from crisis locations, such as Wuhan, where the disease originated, and the cruise ship Diamond Princess.[456]

State Cases Recovered Deceased Remaining
Alaska 1 0 0 1
Arizona 9 1 0 8
Arkansas 6 0 0 6
California[457] 179 6 4 169
Colorado 49 0 0 49
Connecticut 5 0 0 5
Delaware 4 0 0 1
District of Columbia 10 0 0 10
Florida[458] 30 0 2 28
Georgia 31 0 1 30
Hawaii 2 0 0 2
Illinois 25 2 0 23
Indiana 11 0 0 11
Iowa 14 0 0 14
Kansas[459] [460] [461] 5 0 1 4
Kentucky[462][463] 8 0 0 8
Louisiana[127] 13 0 0 13
Maine 1 0 0 1
Maryland 12 3 0 9
Massachusetts 108 1 0 94
Michigan 12 0 0 12
Minnesota[171] 9 0 0 9
Mississippi[464] 1 0 0 1
Missouri 1 0 0 1
Montana 1 0 0 1
Nebraska 11 0 0 10
Nevada 7 0 0 7
New Hampshire 5 0 0 5
New Jersey 23 0 1 22
New Mexico 4 0 0 4
New York[465] 325 0 0 325
North Carolina 9 0 0 9
North Dakota 1 0 0 1
Ohio 5 0 0 5
Oklahoma 3 0 0 2
Oregon 21 0 0 21
Pennsylvania 16 0 0 16
Rhode Island 5 0 0 5
South Carolina 10 0 0 10
South Dakota[466] 8 0 1 7
Tennessee 9 0 0 9
Texas[100] 22 0 0 22
Utah[102] 5 0 0 5
Vermont 2 0 0 2
Virginia[210] 17 0 0 17
Washington 373 1 31 341
Wisconsin 6 1 0 5
Wyoming 1 0 0 1
Total 1389 15 40 1334

CDC reported US totals

Cases in the United States per the CDC[467]
As of March 11, 2020
Cases in the United States reported to CDC
Travel-related 92
Person-to-person spread 75
Under investigation 771
Total cases 938
Cases among persons repatriated to the United States
Wuhan, China 3
Diamond Princess cruise ship 46
Total repatriated cases 49
Deaths
Total deaths from all US cases 29
This table reflects CDC-published totals, and may not
include cases announced in the past 24 hours.

State number of non-repatriated cases by date

This table shows each day's number of newly discovered non-repatriated cases by state. Links to the sources are in the "Sources" column along the table's right side. For dates before March 9, the sources are a mix of news reports and official state reports. After March 9, the sources are each state's department of health. Along the bottom of the table, the "Sources" row holds links to each state's department of health pages on the coronavirus outbreak.


Non-repatriated COVID-19 cases in the US by state ()

Date West Midwest South Northeast Daily
Total
Cml Sources
AZ CA CO HI MT NM NV OR UT WA WY IA IL IN KS MI MN MO ND NE OH OK SD WI AR FL GA KY LA MS NC SC TN TX VA CT DC DE MA MD ME NH NJ NY PA RI VT
Jan 21 1 1 1 [11]
Jan 24 1 1 2 [468]
Jan 25 1 1 3 [469]
Jan 26 1 1 2 5 [470][471]
Jan 30 1 1 6 [472]
Jan 31 1 1 7 [473]
Feb 1 1 1 8 [20]
Feb 2 3 3 11 [21][22]
Feb 5 1 1 12 [474]
Feb 20 2 2 14 [475]
Feb 26 1 1 15 [476][477]
Feb 28 1 1 2 4 19 [478][479][480][481]
Feb 29 1 3 1 5 24 [482][483][484][485]
Mar 1 5 1 7 2 1 2 18 42 [486][487][488][489][490][491][492][493][494]
Mar 2 5 1 5 1 2 1 15 57 [495][496][497][498][499]
Mar 3 1 12 10 1 1 1 1 1 28 85 [500][501][502][503][504][505][506][507][508][509][510]
Mar 4 4 11 1 1 9 26 111 [511][512][513][514][515][516][517]
Mar 5 8 2 1 31 1 1 4 1 3 1 11 64 175 [518][519][520][521][522][523][524][525][526][527][528]
Mar 6 1 11 6 1 1 1 10 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 3 5 2 22 2 1 77 252 [529][530][531][532][79][533][534][535][536][537][538][539][540][541][542][543][544][545][546][547][548][549][550]
Mar 7 2 8 4 22 1 1 2 4 2 1 1 5 45 2 100 352 [551][552][553][554][555][556][557][558][559][560][561][562][563][564][565]
Mar 8 26 1 2 7 34 3 1 1 1 2 4 4 3 4 2 4 1 1 1 15 2 2 2 17 2 1 143 495 [566][567][568][569][570][571][572][573][574][575][576][577][578][579][580][581][582][583][584][585]
Mar 9 19 4 26 5 4 2 3 1 2 6 2 1 5 1 1 1 3 1 3 13 5 36 4 148 643 [586][587][588][589][590][591][592][593][594][595][596][597][598][599][600][601][602][603][604][605][606][607][608][609][610]
Mar 10 1 24 5 1 1 1 105 5 8 2 2 1 2 1 1 5 1 9 5 2 2 2 3 4 4 51 1 1 4 31 2 2 289 932 [611][612][613][614][615][616][617][618][619][620][621][622][623][624][625][626][627][628][629][630][631][632][633][634][635][636][637][638][639]
Mar 11 3 20 17 1 4 4 2 99 1 1 6 4 2 1 3 3 1 3 9 10 1 1 1 2 4 1 5 1 3 3 8 43 4 271 1203 [640][641][642][643][644][645][646][647][648][649][650][651][652][653][654][655][656][657][658][659][660][661][662][663][664][665][666][667][668][669][670][671][672]
Mar 12 21 15 2 5 1 91 2 7 2 3 10 4 1 5 1 1 2 5 4 3 6 7 2 9 2 8 3 3 13 3 1 1 6 112 6 1 368 1571 [673][674][675][676][677][678][679][680][681][682][683][684][685][686][687][688][689][690][691][692][693][694][695][696][697][698][699][700][701][702]
Total 9 174 49 2 1 6 5 24 5 457 1 16 32 12 4 12 9 2 1 10 5 3 8 8 6 30 31 11 19 1 15 12 18 23 17 6 10 4 108 12 1 6 29 328 22 5 2 1571
AZ CA CO HI MT NM NV OR UT WA WY IA IL IN KS MI MN MO ND NE OH OK SD WI AR FL GA KY LA MS NC SC TN TX VA CT DC DE MA MD ME NH NJ NY PA RI VT
West Midwest South Northeast
Sources [703] [704] [705] [706] [707] [708] [709] [710] [711] [712] [713] [714] [715] [716] [717] [718] [719] [720] [721] [722] [723] [724] [725] [726] [727] [728] [729] [730] [731] [732] [733] [734] [735] [736] [737] [738] [739] [740] [741] [742] [743] [744] [745] [746] [747] [748] [749]

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