HOME
The Info List - 1988 Winter Paralympics


--- Advertisement ---



The 1988 Winter Paralympic Games (German: Paralympische Winterspiele 1988) were the fourth Winter Paralympics, held again in Innsbruck, Austria. These were the last Winter Paralympics to be held in a separate location from the Winter Olympics. Beginning in 1992, the Olympics and the Paralympics were held in the same city or in an adjacent city. These Paralympics were not held at the same Olympic venue in Calgary, Canada, because of financial and recruiting difficulties. A total of 377 athletes from 22 countries took part. The USSR competed for the first and only time. Sit-skiing was introduced as another event in both the Alpine and Nordic skiing competitions. Other sports were biathlon and ice sledge speed racing. Ice sledge speed racer Knut Lundstroem from Norway was the most successful athlete, winning four gold medals in the 100m, 500m, 1000m and 1500m events.[1]

Contents

1 Sports 2 Medal table 3 See also 4 References 5 External links

Sports[edit]

Alpine skiing Ice sledge speed racing Nordic skiing

Biathlon Cross-country skiing

Medal table[edit]

Participating countries; first time participants are blue.

Main article: 1988 Winter Paralympics medal table The top 10 NPCs by number of gold medals are listed below. The host nation (Austria) is highlighted.

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total

1  Norway 25 21 14 60

2  Austria 20 10 14 44

3  West Germany 9 11 10 30

4  Finland 9 8 8 25

5  Switzerland 8 7 8 23

6  United States 7 17 6 30

7  France 5 5 3 13

8  Canada 5 3 5 13

9  Sweden 3 7 5 15

10  Italy 3 0 6 9

See also[edit]

Winter Paralympics portal

1988 Winter Olympics 1988 Summer Paralympics

References[edit]

^ "Innsbruck 1988". International Paralympic Committee. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to 1988 Winter Paralympics.

International Paralympic Committee The event at SVT's open archive (in Swedish)

v t e

Paralympic Games

Charter Host cities IPC

NPCs

Medal tables Medalists Participating nations

Summer Winter

Sports Symbols

Summer Games

Rome 1960 Tokyo 1964 Tel Aviv 1968 Heidelberg 1972 Toronto 1976 Arnhem 1980 New York/Stoke Mandeville 1984 Seoul 1988 Barcelona/Madrid 1992 Atlanta 1996 Sydney 2000 Athens 2004 Beijing 2008 London 2012 Rio de Janeiro 2016 Tokyo 2020 Paris 2024 Los Angeles 2028

Winter Games

Örnsköldsvik 1976 Geilo 1980 Innsbruck 1984 Innsbruck 1988 Tignes/Albertville 1992 Lillehammer 1994 Nagano 1998 Salt Lake City 2002 Turin 2006 Vancouver 2010 Sochi 2014 Pyeongchang 2018 Beijing 2022 TBD 2026

Olympic Games Youth Olympic Games Anc

.