Octavius (dialogue)
   HOME
*





Octavius (dialogue)
''Octavius'' is an early writing in defense of Christianity by Marcus Minucius Felix. It is written in the form of a dialogue between the pagan Caecilius Natalis and the Christian Octavius Januarius, a provincial lawyer, the friend and fellow-student of the author. Summary The scene is pleasantly and graphically laid on the beach at Ostia on a holiday afternoon, and the discussion is represented as arising out of the homage paid by Caecilius, in passing, to the Cult image of Serapis. His arguments for paganism (possibly modelled on those of Celsus) are taken up one at a time by Octavius, with the result that the assailant is convinced. Minucius himself plays the part of umpire. The form of the dialogue is modelled on the ''De natura deorum'' and '' De divinatione'' of Cicero and its style is both vigorous and elegant if at times not exempt from something of the affectation of the age. Analysis Its Latinity is not of the specifically Christian type. If the doctrines of the Divine ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  


Marcus Minucius Felix
__NOTOC__ Marcus Minucius Felix (died c. 250 AD in Rome) was one of the earliest of the Latin Christian apologetics, apologists for Christianity. Nothing is known of his personal history, and even the date at which he wrote can be only approximately ascertained as between AD 150 and 270. Jerome's ''De Viris Illustribus (Jerome), De Viris Illustribus'' No. 58 speaks of him as "''Romae insignis causidicus''" [one of Rome's notable solicitors], but in that he is probably only improving on the expression of Lactantius who speaks of him as "non-ignobilis inter causidicos loci" [not unknown among solicitors]. Octavius He is now exclusively known by his ''Octavius (dialogue), Octavius'', a dialogue on Christianity between the paganism, pagan Caecilius Natalis and the Christian Octavius Januarius. Written for educated non-Christians, the arguments are borrowed chiefly from Cicero, especially his ''De natura deorum'' ("Concerning the Nature of the Gods"), and Christian material, mainly fr ...
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]     OR:     [Wikipedia]   [Google]   [Baidu]  



MORE