Longwall Street
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Longwall Street
View north along Longwall Street Longwall Street is a street in central Oxford, England. It runs for about 300 metres along the western flank of Magdalen College. A high, imposing 15th century stone wall separates the college from the street along its entire length. Behind part of the wall is the college's deer park. The street is actually named after the old city wall to the west of the street, now largely hidden in the grounds of New College. Holywell Street and St Cross Road form a junction with the northern end of the street. The High forms a junction with the southern end. Morris Motors In 1902 William Morris (later Lord Nuffield) established his fledgling car business on the site of a disused livery stables in Longwall Street. In 1910 he had new premises built on the site for his Morris Motors Limited with a floor area of , space for 60 cars and showroom display windows. The premises are neo-Georgian, designed by the architects Tollit and Lee and built of red brick ...
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Longwall Street - Geograph
Longwall mining is a form of underground coal mining where a long wall of coal is mined in a single slice (typically thick). The longwall panel (the block of coal that is being mined) is typically long (but can be upto long) and wide. History The basic idea of longwall mining was developed in England in the late 17th century. Miners undercut the coal along the width of the coal face, removing coal as it fell, and used wooden props to control the fall of the roof behind the face. This was known as the Shropshire method of mining. While the technology has changed considerably, the basic idea remains the same, to remove essentially all of the coal from a broad coal face and allow the roof and overlying rock to collapse into the void behind, while maintaining a safe working space along the face for the miners. Starting around 1900, mechanization was applied to this method. By 1940, some referred to longwall mining as "the conveyor method" of mining, after the most prominent pie ...
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William Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield
William Richard Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield, (10 October 1877 – 22 August 1963) was an English motor manufacturer and philanthropist. He was the founder of Morris Motors Limited and is remembered as the founder of the Nuffield Foundation, the Nuffield Trust and Nuffield College, Oxford, as well as being involved in his role as President of BUPA in creating what is now Nuffield Health. He took his title from the village of Nuffield in Oxfordshire, where he lived. Initially Morris Motors relied heavily on Oxford's local labour force, and William Morris became the largest employer in the city. However during the 1920s and 1930s, Oxford saw a dramatic size and population increase following large numbers of unemployed people from depressed areas of Britain seeking work in Morris's factories. This time period was marked with frequent attempts of industrial action protesting against the low pay and poor working conditions in Morris's factories. The first successful strike in a M ...
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Oxfordshire Architectural And Historical Society
The Oxfordshire Architectural and Historical Society (OAHS) has existed in one form or another since at least 1839, although with its current name only since 1972.
, , United Kingdom. Its annual publication, ''Oxoniensia'', has been produced since 1936.


Overview

The Society was founded in 1839 as the Society for Promoting the Study of Gothic Architecture. In 1848, it was renamed to become the Oxford Architectural Society and in 1860 it was re-founded as the Oxford Architectural and Historical Society. In 1972, the society was ...
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Cowley, Oxford
Cowley () is a residential and industrial area in Oxford, England. Cowley's neighbours are Rose Hill and Blackbird Leys to the south, Headington to the north and the villages of Horspath and Garsington across fields to the east. Internationally, Cowley is best known for its automotive industry - historically it was the home of the car manufacturer Morris (later absorbed into British Leyland, then the Rover Group), which has now evolved into Mini. History The Cowley area has been inhabited since Roman times. The line of a Roman road runs north-south along the eastern edge of Cowley. It linked a Roman town at Dorchester-on-Thames with a Roman military camp at Alchester near Bicester. A road called Roman Way follows part of its route. It is behind the Mini car factory, starting opposite the Stagecoach in Oxfordshire bus garage. Cowley coalesced from the former villages of Middle Cowley, Temple Cowley and Church Cowley (around St James church), though the ancient parish of C ...
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Henry James Tollit
Henry James Tollit (1835–1904) was an English architect who practised in Oxford. Tollit trained under William Wilkinson (1819–1901) and was in practice by 1870. He worked in partnership with Edwin Dolby in 1877–78. Tollit was also the county surveyor for Oxfordshire. His son Reginald James Tollit (born 1870) became an architect and had his own practice in Cambridge. ''"H.J. Tollit and Lee"'' are recorded as the firm of architects of the Morris Motors factory built in Longwall Street, Oxford in 1910 but this was six years after H.J. Tollit's death. Works * St Cross parish church, Oxford: organ chamber and vestry, 1876 *St Leonard's parish church, Watlington, Oxfordshire: rebuilding, 1877 (with Dolby) *St Mary the Virgin parish church, Crowell, Oxfordshire: rebuilding, 1878 (with Dolby) *The Eagle Steam Brewery, Park End Street, Oxford: new buildings, 1885 *Thame Town Hall, Oxfordshire, 1888 *Tower Brewery, Park End Street, Oxford: additional buildings, 1890s–1900s *Arch ...
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Georgian Architecture
Georgian architecture is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is named after the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover— George I, George II, George III, and George IV—who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The so-called great Georgian cities of the British Isles were Edinburgh, Bath, pre-independence Dublin, and London, and to a lesser extent York and Bristol. The style was revived in the late 19th century in the United States as Colonial Revival architecture and in the early 20th century in Great Britain as Neo-Georgian architecture; in both it is also called Georgian Revival architecture. In the United States the term "Georgian" is generally used to describe all buildings from the period, regardless of style; in Britain it is generally restricted to buildings that are "architectural in intention", and have stylistic characteristics that are typica ...
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Morris Motors
Morris Motors Limited was a British privately owned motor vehicle manufacturing company formed in 1919 to take over the assets of William Morris, 1st Viscount Nuffield, William Morris's WRM Motors Limited and continue production of the same vehicles. By 1926 its production represented 42 per cent of British car manufacture—a remarkable expansion rate attributed to William Morris's practice of buying in major as well as minor components and assembling them in his own factory. Self-financing through his enormous profits Morris did borrow some money from the public in 1926 and later shared some of Morris Motors' ownership with the public in 1936 when the new capital was used by Morris Motors to buy many of his other privately held businesses. Though it merged... although nearly twenty-five years had elapsed since the BMC merger, not even Austin and Morris, the two volume car manufacturers that formed the core of the original merger, had integrated to a significant degree. Stokes ...
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Livery Stable
A livery is an identifying design, such as a uniform, ornament, symbol or insignia that designates ownership or affiliation, often found on an individual or vehicle. Livery will often have elements of the heraldry relating to the individual or corporate body feature in the livery. Alternatively, some kind of a personal emblem or badge, or a distinctive colour, is featured. The word itself derives from the French ''livrée'', meaning ''dispensed, handed over''. Most often it would indicate that the wearer of the livery was a servant, dependant, follower or friend of the owner of the livery, or, in the case of objects, that the object belonged to them. In the late medieval phenomenon of bastard feudalism, livery badges worn by the "retainers" of great lords, sometimes in effect private armies, became a great political concern in England. Etymology "In the ''Black'' Book of 1483, it was laid down that each person should receive "... for his Livery at night, half a chet loaf, o ...
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High Street, Oxford
The High Street in Oxford, England, known locally as the High, runs between Carfax, generally seen as the centre of the city, and Magdalen Bridge to the east. Overview The street has been described by Nikolaus Pevsner as "''one of the world's great streets''". It forms a gentle curve and is the subject of many prints, paintings, photographs, etc. The looking west towards Carfax with University College on the left and The Queen's College on the right is an especially popular view. There are many historical buildings on the street, including the University of Oxford buildings and colleges. Locally the street is often known as "The High". Major buildings To the north are (west to east): Lincoln College (main entrance on Turl Street, including All Saints Church, now Lincoln College's library.), Brasenose College (main entrance in Radcliffe Square), St Mary's (the University Church), All Souls College, The Queen's College, St Edmund Hall (main entrance in Queen's Lane) an ...
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Oxford
Oxford () is a city in England. It is the county town and only city of Oxfordshire. In 2020, its population was estimated at 151,584. It is north-west of London, south-east of Birmingham and north-east of Bristol. The city is home to the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world; it has buildings in every style of English architecture since late Anglo-Saxon. Oxford's industries include motor manufacturing, education, publishing, information technology and science. History The history of Oxford in England dates back to its original settlement in the Saxon period. Originally of strategic significance due to its controlling location on the upper reaches of the River Thames at its junction with the River Cherwell, the town grew in national importance during the early Norman period, and in the late 12th century became home to the fledgling University of Oxford. The city was besieged during The Anarchy in 1142. The university rose to dom ...
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St Cross Road
St Cross Road is a road in Oxford, England. It links South Parks Road to the north and Longwall Street to the south, where it also meets Holywell Street. The road is named after St Cross Church. Linacre College, one of the colleges in the University of Oxford, is located at the northern end, opposite the Tinbergen Building, used by the university's Department of Zoology and Department of Experimental Psychology. St Catherine's College, another Oxford University college, is in Manor Road, a cul de sac east off St Cross Road. The Oxford University Faculty of Law and Bodleian Law Library are on the corner with Manor Road. Holywell Manor, St Cross Church, Holywell Cemetery, and Jowett Walk are at the southern end. St Cross College (now in St Giles'), one of the Oxford University colleges, used to be located in St Cross Road. The College still has an Annexe here.
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Holywell Street, Oxford
__NOTOC__ Holywell Street is a street in central Oxford, England. It runs east-west with Broad Street to the west and Longwall Street to the east. About halfway along, Mansfield Road adjoins to the north. New College dominates the south side of the street. At the western end of the street is the King's Arms public house on the north corner, a favourite with Oxford University students, and the Indian Institute (now the home of The James Martin 21st Century School) to the south. On the north side is the Holywell Music Room, an historic chamber music venue built in 1742. Opposite a small cul-de-sac, Bath Place, leads via a small winding footpath to the historic Turf Tavern public house close to the old city wall. The wall remains, in places, and follows the course of Holywell Street to the south, partly through New College. The buildings on the corner of Holywell Street and Mansfield Road, along with the Alternative Tuck Shop, are owned by Harris Manchester College, and are u ...
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