Keeper Of The Privy Seal Of Scotland
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Keeper Of The Privy Seal Of Scotland
The office of Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland, one of the Great Officers of State, first appears in the reign of David II. After the Act of Union 1707 its holder was normally a peer, like the Keeper of the Great Seal. The office has remained unfilled since the death of Gavin, Marquess of Breadalbane in 1922. Section 3 of the Public Offices (Scotland) Act 1817 limited the salary for the office to a maximum of £1,200 per annum. The salary was paid out of the fees charged for instruments passing the Privy Seal, after the salary of the Deputy Keeper had been paid. Keepers of the Privy Seal of Scotland *1371: Sir John Lyon *? *1424: Walter Foote, Provost of Bothwell *1426: John Cameron, Provost of Lincluden, Bishop of Glasgow *1432: William Foulis, Provost of Bothwell *1442: William Turnbull, canon of Glasgow *1458: Thomas Spens, Bishop of Galloway *1459: John Arouse *1463: James Lindsay, Provost of Lincluden *1467: Thomas Spens (again), Bishop of Aberdeen *1470: Will ...
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Scottish Royal Arms Panel, St
Scottish usually refers to something of, from, or related to Scotland, including: *Scottish Gaelic, a Celtic Goidelic language of the Indo-European language family native to Scotland *Scottish English *Scottish national identity, the Scottish identity and common culture *Scottish people, a nation and ethnic group native to Scotland *Scots language, a West Germanic language spoken in lowland Scotland *Symphony No. 3 (Mendelssohn), a symphony by Felix Mendelssohn known as ''the Scottish'' See also *Scotch (other) *Scotland (other) *Scots (other) *Scottian (other) *Schottische The schottische is a partnered country dance that apparently originated in Bohemia. It was popular in Victorian era ballrooms as a part of the Bohemian folk-dance craze and left its traces in folk music of countries such as Argentina ("chotis"Span ... * {{disambiguation Language and nationality disambiguation pages ca:Escocès ...
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Thomas Spens
Thomas Spens ''de Spens(c. 1415–15 April 1480), Scottish statesman and prelate, received his education at Edinburgh, was the second son of John de Spens, custodian of Prince James of Scotland, and of Lady Isabel Wemyss. Biography By his exceptional abilities, he attracted the notice the Scottish king, James II, who sent him on errands to England and to France, where he negotiated several treaties. About 1450 he became bishop of Galloway; soon afterwards he was made Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland, and in 1459 he was chosen bishop of Aberdeen. Much of his time, however, was passed in journeys to France and to England, and in 1464 he and Alexander Stewart, duke of Albany, a son of James II, were captured at sea by some English sailors. Edward IV, to whom the bishop had previously revealed an assassination plot, set him at liberty, and he was perhaps partly responsible for the treaty of peace made about this time between the English king and James III. He also h ...
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Abbot Of Arbroath
The Abbot of Arbroath or Abbot of Aberbrothok (and later Commendator) was the head of the Tironensian Benedictine monastic community of Arbroath Abbey, Angus, Scotland, founded under the patronage of King William of Scotland from Kelso Abbey and dedicated to St Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas Becket. The abbot, John Gedy, was granted the mitre on 26 June 1396. Arbroath Abbey became the wealthiest and most powerful abbey in later medieval Scotland. According to the poem "The Inchcape Rock" by Robert Southey, John Gedy, then Abbot of Aberbrothok, fixed a bell to the inchcape rock in the 1300s to warn mariners of the perilous rock. The following is a list of abbots and commendators. *Reginald, 1178–79 *Henry, 1179–1207 *Gilbert, 1208–19 x 1229 *Radulf de Lamley, 1225–39 *Adam, 1240–46 *Walter, 1247–58 x *Robert, 1261–67 *Sabinus, 1267 ? *John, 1268–70 *William, 1276–84 *Henry, 1285–96 *Nicholas, 1296 x 99-1301Became Bishop of Dunblane. *John de Anegus, 1303–09 ...
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Alexander Gordon (d
Alexander Gordon may refer to: * Alexander Gordon, 1st Earl of Huntly (died 1470), Scottish magnate * Alexander Gordon (bishop of Aberdeen) (died 1518), Precentor of Moray and Bishop-elect of Aberdeen * Alexander Gordon, 3rd Earl of Huntly (died 1524), Scottish nobleman * Alexander Gordon, Master of Sutherland (died 1530), Scottish magnate * Alexander Gordon (bishop of Galloway) (died 1575), formerly bishop of the Isles and archbishop of Glasgow * Alexander Gordon (pioneer) (1635–1697), Scottish settler in New England * Alexander Gordon (general) (1670–1752), Laird of Auchintoul, Scottish general of the Russian army and Jacobite * Alexander Gordon (antiquary) (c. 1692–1755), Scottish antiquary and singer * Alexander Gordon, 2nd Duke of Gordon (c. 1678–1728), Scottish peer * Alexander Gordon, 18th-century British founder of Gordon's Gin * Alexander Gordon, Lord Rockville (1739–1792), Scottish judge * Alexander Gordon (physician) (1752–1799), Scottish physician * Alexan ...
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William Elphinstone
William Elphinstone (143125 October 1514) was a Scottish statesman, Bishop of Aberdeen and founder of the University of Aberdeen. Biography He was born in Glasgow. His father, also William Elphinstone, later became the first Dean of the Faculty of Arts at the University of Glasgow. It has been suggested that his mother may have been Margaret Douglas, daughter of Sir William Douglas, the first laird of Drumlanrig.Macfarlane, Leslie J. (1995), ''William Elphinstone and the Kingdom of Scotland 1431 - 1514: The Struggle for Order'', Aberdeen University Press, pp. 16 & 17 William Elphinstone junior was educated at the High School of Glasgow and then the University of Glasgow, taking the degree of M.A. in 1452. After practising for a short time as a lawyer in the church courts, he was ordained a priest, becoming rector of St. Michael's Church, Trongate, Glasgow, in 1465. Four years later he went to continue his studies at the University of Paris, where he became reader in Canon la ...
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Prior Of St Andrews
The Prior of St Andrews was the head of the property and community of Augustinian canons of St Andrews Cathedral Priory, St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. It was established by King David I in 1140 with canons from Nostell Priory, West Yorkshire. It is possible that, initially at least, the prior of St Andrews was subordinate to the bishop as abbot, but by the 13th century the canons of St Andrews were given freedom by the bishop to elect their prior. By the end of the 13th century, the abbacy of the native canons (i.e. the ''Céli Dé'', or Culdees) was no longer there to challenge the position of the priory, and the native canons themselves had been formed into a collegiate church. The position of prior became secularized and the priory itself carved up into lordships in the 16th century, although the core and title remained into the 17th century. The following is a list of known priors and commendators: List of priors * Robert I, 1140x1144-1160 * Walter I, 1160-1195 * Gilbert I, 11 ...
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James III Of Scotland
James III (10 July 1451/May 1452 – 11 June 1488) was King of Scots from 1460 until his death at the Battle of Sauchieburn in 1488. He inherited the throne as a child following the death of his father, King James II, at the siege of Roxburgh Castle. James III's reign began with a minority that lasted almost a decade, during which Scotland was governed by a series of regents and factions who struggled for possession of the young king, before his personal rule began in 1469. James III was an unpopular and ineffective king, and was confronted with two major rebellions during his reign. He was much criticised by contemporaries and later chroniclers for his promotion of unrealistic schemes to invade or take possession of Brittany, Guelders and Saintonge at the expense of his regular duties as king. While his reign saw Scotland reach its greatest territorial extent with the acquisition of Orkney and Shetland through his marriage to Margaret of Denmark, James was accused of debasing ...
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Andrew Stewart (d
Andrew Stewart may refer to: * Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avandale ( 1420–1488), Lord Chancellor of Scotland * Andrew Stewart, 1st Lord Avondale (second creation) (died 1513), Scottish nobleman * Andrew Stewart (bishop of Caithness, died 1517), Bishop of Caithness and Treasurer of Scotland * Andrew Stewart (bishop of Moray) (1442–1501), Scottish prelate and administrator * Andrew Stewart, 2nd Lord Avondale ( 1505–1549), Scottish peer * Andrew Stewart (bishop of Caithness, died 1541) ( 1490–1541), Scottish noble and cleric * Andrew Stewart, 2nd Lord Ochiltree ( 1521–1591) * Andrew Stewart (minister) (1771–1838), Scottish physician and minister of the Church of Scotland * Andrew Stewart (American politician, died 1872) (1791–1872), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania * Andrew Stewart (American politician, died 1903) (1836–1903), U.S. Representative from Pennsylvania * Andrew Stewart (footballer), Scottish footballer in the 1890s * Andrew Stewart (economist) (1904 ...
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Bishop Of Moray
The Bishop of Moray or Bishop of Elgin was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Moray in northern Scotland, one of Scotland's 13 medieval bishoprics. If the foundation charter of the monastery at Scone is reliable, then the Bishopric of Moray was in existence as early as the reign of King Alexander I of Scotland (1107–1124), but was certainly in existence by 1127, when one Gregoir ("Gregorius") is mentioned as "Bishop of Moray" in a charter of king David I of Scotland. The bishopric had its seat ( la, Cathedra) at Elgin and Elgin Cathedral, but was severally at Birnie, Kinneddar and as late as Bishop Andreas de Moravia at Spynie, where the bishops continued to maintain a palace. The Bishopric's links with Rome ceased to exist after the Scottish Reformation, but continued, saving temporary abolition between 1638 and 1661, under the episcopal Church of Scotland until the Revolution of 1688. Episcopacy in the established church in Scotland was permanently abolished in 1689. Th ...
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Bishop Of Orkney
The Bishop of Orkney was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Orkney, one of thirteen medieval bishoprics of Scotland. It included both Orkney and Shetland. It was based for almost all of its history at St Magnus Cathedral, Kirkwall. The bishopric appears to have been suffragan of the Archbishop of York (with intermittent control exercised by the Archbishop of Hamburg-Bremen) until the creation of the Archbishopric of Trondheim ('' Niðaros'') in 1152. Although Orkney itself did not unite with mainland Scotland until 1468, the Scottish kings and political community had been pushing for control of the islands for centuries. The see, however, remained under the nominal control of Trondheim until the creation of the Archbishopric of St Andrews in 1472, when it became for the first time an officially Scottish bishopric. The Bishopric's links with Rome ceased to exist after the Scottish Reformation. The bishopric continued, saving temporary abolition between 1638 and 1661, unde ...
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William Tulloch
William de Tulloch (died 1482) was a 15th-century Scottish prelate. A native of Angus, he became a canon of Orkney, almost certainly brought there by his relative Thomas de Tulloch, Bishop of Orkney. He was provided to the bishopric upon the resignation of his cousin by Pope Pius II at the Apostolic see on 11 December 1461. He had been consecrated by 21 July 1462, when he rendered an oath of fealty at Copenhagen to Christian I, King of Denmark, Norway and Sweden. In 1468 he was one of the ambassadors responsible for organising the marriage between King James III of Scotland and Margaret of Denmark, the daughter of King Christian. The marriage resulted in the formal transfer of Orkney and Shetland to the sovereignty of the Scottish crown. He was Keeper of the Privy Seal of Scotland from 25 June 1470 onwards. He was sent to England in 1471 as an ambassador. He became tacksman, holding the administration of Orkney and Shetland from 27 August 1472 until 28 July 1478, continuing ...
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Bishop Of Aberdeen
The Bishop of Aberdeen (originally Bishop of Mortlach, in Latin Murthlacum) was the ecclesiastical head of the Diocese of Aberdeen, one of Scotland's 13 medieval bishoprics, whose first recorded bishop is an early 12th-century cleric named Nechtan. It appears that the episcopal seat had previously been at Mortlach (Mòrthlach), but was moved to Aberdeen during the reign of King David I of Scotland. The names of three bishops of Mortlach are known, the latter two of whom, "Donercius" and "Cormauch" (Cormac), by name only. The Bishop of Aberdeen broke communion with the Roman Catholic Church after the Scottish Reformation. Following the Revolution of 1688, the office was abolished in the Church of Scotland, but continued in the Scottish Episcopal Church. A Roman Catholic diocese was recreated in Aberdeen in 1878. Pre-Reformation bishops List of known bishops of Mortlach List of known bishops of Aberdeen The Bishopric of Aberdeen, as the Bishopric of Aberdeen, appears to da ...
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