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Site Tree (forestry)
Site tree refers to a type of tree used in forestry, which is used to classify the quality of growing conditions trees at a particular forest location. A site tree, is a single tree in a stand (group of growing trees) that gives a good representation of the average dominant or co-dominant tree in the stand. Site trees are used to calculate the site index of the site in reference to a particular tree species. A site tree should belong to the dominant or co-dominant overstory class.[1] The total height of the tree and age measured at Diameter at breast height of a sample of site trees will be used to determine a site index, which will show how tall trees of different species can grow on that site in a set amount of time. Sometimes several years are added to the breast-height age to account for time grown below 4.5 feet (1.4 m). Determining what a site tree should look like in a stand varies with what kind of stand one is standing in
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Oreilly

It is also the patronymic form of the Irish name Reilly (Irish Gaelic: Uí Raghaile).[2] It is commonly found throughout Ireland, with the greatest concentration of the surname found in County Cavan followed by Longford, Meath, Westmeath, Fermanagh and Monaghan, and the Province of Leinster. It is usually anglicised as Reilly and O'Reilly. The original form of the name, Ó Raghallaigh, denotes "from/of Raghallach", the name Raghallach thought to be derived from the compounds ragh (meaning "race") and ceallach (meaning "sociable"). The Ó Raghallaigh family were part of the Connachta, with the eponymous Raghallach said to have died at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014
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XML
Extensible Markup Language (XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The World Wide Web Consortium's XML 1.0 Specification[2] of 1998[3] and several other related specifications[4]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[5] The design goals of XML emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[6] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode for different human languages
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Web Indexing
Web indexing, or internet indexing, comprises methods for indexing the contents of a website or of the Internet as a whole. Individual websites or intranets may use a back-of-the-book index, while search engines usually use keywords and metadata to provide a more useful vocabulary for Internet or onsite searching. With the increase in the number of periodicals that have articles online, web indexing is also becoming important for periodical websites.[1] Back-of-the-book-style web indexes may be called "web site A-Z indexes".[2] The implication with "A-Z" is that there is an alphabetical browse view or interface. This interface differs from that of a browse through layers of hierarchical categories (also known as a taxonomy) which are not necessarily alphabetical, but are also found on some web sites
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Web Site

A website (also written as web site) is a collection of web pages and related content that is identified by a common domain name and published on at least one web server. Notable examples are wikipedia.org, google.com, and amazon.com. All publicly accessible websites collectively constitute the World Wide Web. There are also private websites that can only be accessed on a private network, such as a company's internal website for its employees. Websites are typically dedicated to a particular topic or purpose, such as news, education, commerce, entertainment, or social networking
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Web Page
A web page (or webpage) is a specific collection of information provided by a website and displayed to a user in a web browser. A website typically consists of many web pages linked together in a coherent fashion. The name "web page" is a metaphor of paper pages bound together into a book. The core element of a web page is one or more text files written in the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML).[1] Many web pages also make use of JavaScript code for dynamic behavior and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) code for presentation semantics.[1] Images, videos, and other multimedia files are also often embedded in web pages. Each web page is identified by a distinct Uniform Resource Locator (URL). When the user inputs a URL into their browser, that page's elements are downloaded from web servers
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