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Desert Of Paran
The Desert of Paran or Wilderness of Paran (also sometimes spelled Pharan or Faran; Hebrew:מִדְבַּר פָּארָן‎, Midbar Pa'ran), is a location mentioned in the Hebrew Bible. It is one of the places where the Israelites spent part of their 40 years of wandering after the Exodus, and was also a home to Ishmael, and a place of refuge for David
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Sodom And Gomorrah
Sodom and Gomorrah (/ˈsɒdəm ...ɡəˈmɒrə/)[1] were two cities mentioned in the Book of Genesis[2] and throughout the Hebrew Bible,[3] the New Testament, and in the deuterocanonical books, as well as in the Quran and the hadith.[4] According to the Torah, the kingdoms of Sodom and Gomorrah were allied with the cities of Admah, Zeboim, and Bela. These five cities, also known as the "cities of the plain" (from Genesis in the King James Version), were situated on the Jordan River plain in the southern region of the land of Canaan. The plain was compared to the garden of Eden[Gen.13:10] as being well-watered and green, suitable for grazing livestock. Divine judgment was passed upon them and four of them were consumed by fire and brimstone. Neighboring Zoar (Bela) was the only city to be spared
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Eusebius
Eusebius of Caesarea (/jˈsbiəs/; Greek: Εὐσέβιος τῆς Καισαρείας, Eusébios tés Kaisareías; AD 260/265 – 339/340), also known as Eusebius Pamphili (from the Greek: Εὐσέβιος τοῦ Παμϕίλου), was a historian of Christianity, exegete, and Christian polemicist. He became the bishop of Caesarea Maritima about 314 AD. Together with Pamphilus, he was a scholar of the Biblical canon and is regarded as one of the most learned Christians of his time.[7] He wrote Demonstrations of the Gospel, Preparations for the Gospel and On Discrepancies between the Gospels, studies of the Biblical text. As "Father of Church History" (not to be confused with the title of Church Father), he produced the Ecclesiastical History, On the Life of Pamphilus, the Chronicle and On the Martyrs
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Jabal Al-Lawz
Jabal al-Lawz (Arabic: جَبَل ٱللَّوْز‎), also known as Gebel el-Lawz, is a mountain located in northwest Saudi Arabia, near the Jordanian border, above the Gulf of Aqaba at 2,580 metres (8,460 feet) above sea level. The name means 'mountain of almonds'.[2] The peak of Jabal al-Lawz, consists of a light-colored, calc-alkaline granite that is intruded by rhyolite and andesite dikes which generally trend eastward.[3] Between 1300 and 2200 meters elevation, Jabal al-Lawz has relict Mediterranean woodlands of Juniperus phoenicea, with an understory of Achillea santolinoides, Artemisia sieberi, and Astracantha echinus subsp
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Jebel Musa
Mount Sinai (Hebrew: הר סיניHar Sinai; Greek: Όρος Σινάι), traditionally known as Jabal Musa (Arabic: جَبَل مُوسَىٰ‎, translation: Mount Moses), is a mountain in the Sinai Peninsula of Egypt that is a possible location of the biblical Mount Sinai, the place where Moses is said to have received the Ten Commandments. It is a 2,285-metre (7,497 ft) moderately high mountain near the city of Saint Catherine in the region known in modern times as the Sinai Peninsula
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Wadi Feiran
Wadi Feiran is Sinai's largest and widest wadi (valley or dry riverbed). It rises from the mountains around Saint Catherine's Monastery, at 2500 m above sea level.[1] It is important because according to Hebrew Scriptures' Rephidim, Moses struck a rock, creating a spring to provide people with drinking water.[2] Wadi Feiran is an 81-mile (130 km) wadi on Egypt's Sinai Peninsula
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Mount Seir
Mount Seir (Hebrew: הַר-שֵׂעִיר‎, Har Se'ir; Arabic: جبال الشراة‎, Jibāl ash-Sharāh) is the ancient and biblical name for a mountainous region stretching between the Dead Sea and the Gulf of Aqaba in the northwestern region of Edom and southeast of the Kingdom of Judah. It may also have marked the older historical limit of Ancient Egypt in Canaan.[1] A place called "Seir, in the land of Shasu" (ta-Shasu se`er, t3-sh3sw s`r), thought to be near Petra, Jordan, is listed in the temple of Amenhotep III at Soleb (ca. 1380 BC). The Hebrew Bible mentions two distinct geographical areas named Seir: a 'land of Seir' and 'Mount Seir' in the South, bordered by the Arabah to the west; and another 'Mount Seir' further north, on the north boundary of Judah, mentioned in Ezekiel ch
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