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Yama
Yama
Yama
( listen (help·info)) or Yamarāja is a god of death, the south direction, and the underworld,[1] belonging to an early stratum of Rigvedic Hindu deities. In Sanskrit, his name can be interpreted to mean "twin".[2] In the Zend- Avesta
Avesta
of Zoroastrianism, he is called "Yima".[3] According to the Vishnu Purana, Yama
Yama
is the son of sun-god Surya[4] and Sandhya, the daughter of Vishvakarma. Yama
Yama
is the brother of Sraddhadeva Manu
Sraddhadeva Manu
and of his older sister Yami, which Horace Hayman Wilson indicates to mean the Yamuna.[5] According to the Vedas, Yama is said to have been the first mortal who died
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Buddhism In Thailand
Buddhism
Buddhism
in Thailand
Thailand
is largely of the Theravada
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Buddhism In Vietnam
Buddhism
Buddhism
in Vietnam
Vietnam
(Đạo Phật or Phật Giáo in Vietnamese), as practised by the ethnic Vietnamese, is mainly of the Mahayana tradition.[1]
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Tibet
Coordinates: 31°12′N 88°48′E / 31.2°N 88.8°E / 31.2; 88.8              "Greater Tibet" as claimed by Tibetan exile groups Tibetan autonomous areas, as designated by China  Tibet
Tibet
Autonomous Region, within ChinaChinese-controlled, claimed by India
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Buddhist Mythology
Buddhism
Buddhism
includes a wide array of divine beings that are venerated in various ritual and popular contexts. Initially they included mainly Indian deities such as devas and yakshas, but later came to include other Asian spirits and local gods. They range from enlightened Buddhas to regional spirits adopted by Buddhists or practiced on the margins of the religion. Buddhists later also came to incorporate aspects from countries such as China and Japan into their pantheons.[1] As such, it includes many aspects taken from other mythologies of those cultures
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Theravada
Theravāda
Theravāda
(/ˌθɛrəˈvɑːdə/; Pali, literally "school of the elder monks") is a branch of Buddhism
Buddhism
that uses the Buddha's teaching preserved in the Pāli Canon
Pāli Canon
as its doctrinal core
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Rebirth (Buddhism)
Rebirth in Buddhism
Buddhism
refers to its teaching that the actions of a person lead to a new existence after death, in endless cycles called saṃsāra.[1][2] This cycle is considered to be dukkha, unsatisfactory and painful
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Pitrs
The Pitris (Sanskrit: पितृ, the fathers), are the spirits of the departed ancestors in Hindu culture. They are often remembered annually.Contents1 The human and divine Pitris 2 Seven classes of the divine Pitṛs2.1 The Pitṛ-Vaṁśa (genealogy of the Pitṛs)3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesThe human and divine Pitris[edit] The most complete accounts about the Pitṛs are found in the Vayu Purana and Brahmanda Purana
Brahmanda Purana
and both are practically identical. The account in the Harivamsha
Harivamsha
is shorter but agrees closely with them. The similar but brief accounts are also found in the Matsya Purana
Matsya Purana
and Padma Purana. According to these accounts there are different classes of the Pitṛs and they have different origins, forms, grades and abodes
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Vedas
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu
Hindu
textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma
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Horace Hayman Wilson
Horace Hayman Wilson
Horace Hayman Wilson
(26 September 1786 – 8 May 1860) was an English orientalist.[1] He studied medicine at St Thomas's Hospital, and went out to India
India
in 1808 as assistant-surgeon on the Bengal
Bengal
establishment of the British East India
India
Company. His knowledge of metallurgy caused him to be attached to the mint at Calcutta, where he was for a time associated with John Leyden.Contents1 Biography 2 Notes 3 References 4 Further readingBiography[edit] Wilson became deeply interested in the ancient language and literature of India, and by the recommendation of Henry Thomas Colebrooke, he was in 1811 appointed secretary to the Asiatic Society of Bengal
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Shraddhadeva Manu
In Hindu mythology, Shraddhadeva Manu (Sanskrit manuśraddhādeva) is the current Manu and the progenitor of the current humanity (manvantara). He is the seventh of the 14 manus of the current kalpa (aeon). Shraddhadeva was the king of the Dravida Kingdom before the great flood. Forewarned about the flood by the matsya avatara of Vishnu, he saved the humanity by building a boat that carried his family and the saptarishi to safety. He is the son of Vivasvat and is therefore also known as Manuvaivasvata.[1] He is also called Satyavrata (always truthful).Contents1 Ancestry 2 The Great Deluge 3 Descendants 4 Theosophy 5 References5.1 BibliographyAncestry[edit] According to the Puranas, the genealogy of Shraddhadeva is as follows:[2]Brahma Marichi, one of the 10 Prajapatis created by Brahma. Kashyapa, son of Marichi and his wife, Kala
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Buddhism In Korea
Korean Buddhism
Buddhism
is distinguished from other forms of Buddhism
Buddhism
by its attempt to resolve what it sees as inconsistencies in Mahayana Buddhism. Early Korean monks believed that the traditions they received from foreign countries were internally inconsistent. To address this, they developed a new holistic approach to Buddhism. This approach is characteristic of virtually all major Korean thinkers, and has resulted in a distinct variation of Buddhism, which is called Tongbulgyo ("interpenetrated Buddhism"), a form that sought to harmonize all disputes (a principle called hwajaeng 和諍) by Korean scholars.[1] Korean Buddhist thinkers refined their predecessors' ideas into a distinct form. As it now stands, Korean Buddhism
Buddhism
consists mostly of the Seon lineage, primarily represented by the Jogye and Taego Orders
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Sraddhadeva Manu
In Hindu mythology, Shraddhadeva Manu (Sanskrit manuśraddhādeva) is the current Manu and the progenitor of the current humanity (manvantara). He is the seventh of the 14 manus of the current kalpa (aeon). Shraddhadeva was the king of the Dravida Kingdom before the great flood. Forewarned about the flood by the matsya avatara of Vishnu, he saved the humanity by building a boat that carried his family and the saptarishi to safety. He is the son of Vivasvat and is therefore also known as Manuvaivasvata.[1] He is also called Satyavrata (always truthful).Contents1 Ancestry 2 The Great Deluge 3 Descendants 4 Theosophy 5 References5.1 BibliographyAncestry[edit] According to the Puranas, the genealogy of Shraddhadeva is as follows:[2]Brahma Marichi, one of the 10 Prajapatis created by Brahma. Kashyapa, son of Marichi and his wife, Kala
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Zoroastrianism
Zoroastrianism,[n 1] or more natively Mazdayasna (Persian: مَزدَیَسنا یا دین زرتشتی), is one of the world's oldest extant religions, "combining a cosmogonic dualism and eschatological monotheism in a manner unique [...] among the major religions of the world".[1] Ascribed to the teachings of the Iranian-speaking prophet Zoroaster
Zoroaster
(or Zarathustra),[2] it exalts a deity of wisdom, Ahura Mazda
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Gada (mace)
The gada (Sanskrit: गदा gadā, Tamil: gadai, Malay: gedak Old Tagalog: batuta) is a club or blunt mace from South Asia. Made either of wood or metal, it consists essentially of a spherical head mounted on a shaft, with a spike on the top. Outside India, the gada was also adopted in Southeast Asia, where it is still used in silat. The gada is the main weapon of the Hindu God Hanuman. Known for his strength, Hanuman
Hanuman
is traditionally worshipped by wrestlers in South and Southeast Asia. Vishnu
Vishnu
also carries a gada named Kaumodaki
Kaumodaki
in one of his four hands
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