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Xocoatl
Chocolate
Chocolate
(from náhuatl: xocolātl ) (/ˈtʃɒklɪt, -kəlɪt, -lət, ˈtʃɔːk-/ ( listen)) is a typically sweet, usually brown food preparation of Theobroma cacao
Theobroma cacao
seeds, roasted and ground. It is made in the form of a liquid, paste, or in a block, or used as a flavoring ingredient in other foods. Cacao has been cultivated by many cultures for at least three millennia in Mesoamerica. The earliest evidence of use traces to the Olmecs (Mexico), with evidence of chocolate beverages dating back to 1900 BCE.[1] The majority of Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
people made chocolate beverages, including the Maya and Aztecs.[2] The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste and must be fermented to develop the flavor. After fermentation, the beans are dried, cleaned, and roasted
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Chocolate (other)
Chocolate
Chocolate
is a foodstuff. Chocolate
Chocolate
may also refer to:Contents1 Geography 2 Music 3 Film and television 4 Other uses 5 See alsoGeography[edit]
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Chocolate Milk
Chocolate
Chocolate
milk is sweetened chocolate-flavored milk. It can be made by mixing chocolate syrup (or chocolate powder) with milk (from cows, goats, soy, rice, etc.). It can be purchased pre-mixed with milk or made at home by blending milk with cocoa powder and a sweetener (such as sugar or a sugar substitute), melted chocolate, chocolate syrup, or a pre-made powdered chocolate milk mix. Other ingredients, such as starch, salt, carrageenan, vanilla, or artificial flavoring are sometimes added. To add nutritional value to the product, sometimes some minerals like zinc oxide or iron are added. The carrageenan is used at very low concentrations to form an imperceptible weak gel that prevents the large, dense particles of chocolate from sedimentation. Chocolate
Chocolate
milk should be refrigerated like unflavored milk, with the exception of some ultra high temperature (UHT) pasteurized drinks, which can be stored at room temperature
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Chocolate Pudding
Chocolate
Chocolate
puddings are a class of desserts with chocolate flavors. There are two main types: a boiled then chilled dessert, texturally a custard set with starch, commonly eaten in the U.S., Canada, Germany, Sweden, Poland, and East and South East Asia; and a steamed/baked version, texturally similar to cake, popular in the UK, Ireland, Australia, Germany
Germany
and New ZealandContents1 British Isles and Australasian version 2 North American and Asian version 3 Nutrition Information 4 See also 5 ReferencesBritish Isles and Australasian version[edit] In Britain, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand, chocolate pudding is similar in preparation to the Daily Do versions in early 20th century United States. It is a steamed dessert which consists of flour, baking powder, sugar, whole eggs, vanilla aroma, and cocoa powder or chocolate mixed together to make a batter and steamed or baked similar to Christmas pudding
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Chocolate Mousse
A mousse (French 'foam' /ˈmuːs/) is a soft prepared food that incorporates air bubbles to give it a light and airy texture. It can range from light and fluffy to creamy and thick, depending on preparation techniques. A mousse may be sweet or savoury.[1] Sweet mousses are typically made with whipped egg whites and flavored with one or more of chocolate, coffee, caramel,[2] puréed fruits, or various herbs and spices, such as mint or vanilla.[3] In the case of some chocolate mousses, egg yolks are often stirred into melted chocolate to give the final product a richer mouthfeel. Mousses are also typically chilled before being served, which gives them a denser texture. Sweetened mousse is served as a dessert, or used as an airy cake filling. It is sometimes stabilized with gelatin.[4][5] Savory mousses can be made from meat, fish, shellfish, foie gras, cheese, or vegetables
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Chocolate Brownie
A chocolate brownie (commonly referred to as simply brownie) is a square, baked, chocolate dessert. Brownies come in a variety of forms and may be either fudgy or cakey, depending on their density. They may include nuts, frosting, cream cheese, chocolate chips, or other ingredients. A variation made with brown sugar rather than chocolate in the batter is called a blonde brownie or blondie. The brownie was developed in the United States
United States
at the end of the 19th century and popularized in the U.S. and Canada during the first half of the 20th century. Brownies are typically eaten by hand, often accompanied by milk, served warm with ice cream (a la mode), topped with whipped cream, or sprinkled with powdered sugar and fudge
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Chocolate Chip Cookie
A chocolate chip cookie is a drop cookie that originated in the United States and features chocolate chips (small morsels of sweetened chocolate) as its distinguishing ingredient. Circa 1938, Ruth Graves Wakefield added chopped up bits from a Nestlé
Nestlé
semi-sweet chocolate bar into a cookie. The traditional recipe combines a dough composed of butter and both brown and white sugar, semi-sweet chocolate chips and vanilla. Variations include recipes with other types of chocolate as well as additional ingredients such as nuts or oatmeal
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Candy
Candy, also called sweets or lollies, is a confection that features sugar as a principal ingredient[citation needed]. The category, called sugar confectionery, encompasses any sweet confection, including chocolate, chewing gum, and sugar candy. Vegetables, fruit, or nuts which have been glazed and coated with sugar are said to be candied. Physically, candy is characterized by the use of a significant amount of sugar or sugar substitutes. Unlike a cake or loaf of bread that would be shared among many people, candies are usually made in smaller pieces. However, the definition of candy also depends upon how people treat the food. Unlike sweet pastries served for a dessert course at the end of a meal, candies are normally eaten casually, often with the fingers, as a snack between meals. Each culture has its own ideas of what constitutes candy rather than dessert
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Chocolate Bar
A chocolate bar is a chocolate confection in an oblong or rectangular form, which distinguishes it from bulk chocolate produced for commercial use or individually portioned chocolates such as pastilles,[1] bon-bons, and truffles. In most of the English-speaking world, chocolate bar also refers to a typically snack-sized bar coated with or substantially consisting of chocolate but containing other ingredients. The first solid chocolate bar was produced by Fry's of Bristol, England in 1847, which was then mass-produced as Fry's Chocolate
Chocolate
Cream in 1866.[2] A chocolate bar made exclusively from chocolate contains some or all of the following components: cocoa solids, cocoa butter, sugar, and milk. The relative presence or absence of these define the subclasses of chocolate bar made of dark chocolate, milk chocolate, and white chocolate
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Candy Bar
A candy bar is a type of sugar confectionery that is in the shape of a bar. Many varieties of candy bars exist,[1][2] and many are mass-produced.[3][4] A candy bar frequently, though not necessarily, includes chocolate. A combination candy bar is one that contains chocolate plus other ingredients, such as nuts or nougat
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Snack
A snack is a portion of food, smaller than a regular meal, generally eaten between meals.[1] Snacks come in a variety of forms including packaged snack foods and other processed foods, as well as items made from fresh ingredients at home. Traditionally, snacks are prepared from ingredients commonly available in the home. Often cold cuts, fruits, leftovers, nuts, sandwiches, and sweets are used as snacks. The Dagwood sandwich
Dagwood sandwich
was originally the humorous result of a cartoon character's desire for large snacks. With the spread of convenience stores, packaged snack foods became a significant business. Snack
Snack
foods are typically designed to be portable, quick, and satisfying. Processed snack foods, as one form of convenience food, are designed to be less perishable, more durable, and more portable than prepared foods
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Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day, also called Saint
Saint
Valentine's Day
Valentine's Day
or the Feast of Saint
Saint
Valentine,[1] is celebrated annually on February 14
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Hanukkah Gelt
Hanukkah
Hanukkah
gelt (Yiddish: חנוכה געלט‎ ḥanukah gelt ; Hebrew: דמי חנוכה‬ dmei ḥanukah, both meaning literally " Hanukkah
Hanukkah
money") refers to money as well as chocolate coins given to Jewish children on the festival of Hanukkah.Contents1 History1.1 Money 1.2 Chocolate2 Customs 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Money[edit] Rabbi
Rabbi
A. P. Bloch has written that"The tradition of giving money (Chanukah gelt) to children is of long standing. The custom had its origin in the 17th-century practice of Polish Jewry to give money to their small children for distribution to their teachers. In time, as children demanded their due, money was also given to children to keep for themselves. Teenage boys soon came in for their share
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Hot Chocolate
Hot chocolate, also known as Chocolate
Chocolate
tea, drinking chocolate or just cocoa is a heated beverage consisting of shaved chocolate, melted chocolate or cocoa powder, heated milk or water, and usually a sweetener. Hot chocolate
Hot chocolate
may be topped with whipped cream. Hot chocolate made with melted chocolate is sometimes called drinking chocolate, characterized by less sweetness and a thicker consistency.[1] The first chocolate beverage is believed to have been created by the Mayans around 2,500-3,000 years ago, and a cocoa beverage was an essential part of Aztec
Aztec
culture by 1400 AD, by which they referred to as xocōlātl.[2][3] The beverage became popular in Europe after being introduced from Mexico
Mexico
in the New World
New World
and has undergone multiple changes since then
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Dessert
Dessert
Dessert
(/dɪˈzɜːrt/) is a confectionery course that concludes a main meal. The course usually consists of sweet foods, and possibly a beverage such as dessert wine or liqueur, but may include coffee, cheeses, nuts, or other savory items. In some parts of the world, such as much of central and western Africa, and most parts of China, there is no tradition of a dessert course to conclude a meal. The term "dessert" can apply to many confections, such as cakes, tarts, cookies, biscuits, gelatins, pastries, ice creams, pies, puddings, custards, and sweet soups. Fruit
Fruit
is also commonly found in dessert courses because of its naturally occurring sweetness
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Creme De Cacao
Crème or creme is a French word for 'cream', used in culinary terminology for various cream-like preparations, each often abbreviated to simply "creme":Cream Crème fraîche, a cultured cream Crème Chantilly, whipped creamCustard Crème anglaise, a pouring custard used as a dessert sauce C
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