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Wort
WORT (/ˈwɜːrt/ ) is the liquid extracted from the mashing process during the brewing of beer or whisky . Wort
Wort
contains the sugars that will be fermented by the brewing yeast to produce alcohol . PRODUCTION Draining wort The first step in wort production is to make malt from dried, sprouted barley . The malt is then run through a roller mill and cracked. This cracked grain is then mashed , that is, mixed with hot water and steeped , a slow heating process that enables enzymes to convert the starch in the malt into sugars. At set intervals, most notably when the mixture has reached temperatures of 45, 62 and 73 °C (113, 144 and 163 °F), the heating is briefly halted. The temperature of the mixture is usually increased to 78 °C (172 °F) for mashout . Lautering
Lautering
is the next step, which means the sugar-extracted grist or solids remaining in the mash are separated from the liquid wort
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Grain Whisky
GRAIN WHISKY ordinarily refers to any whisky made, at least in part, from grains other than malted barley , such as whisky made using maize (corn), wheat or rye . Grain
Grain
whiskies may also contain some malted barley (and are required to if produced in Ireland
Ireland
or Scotland
Scotland
.) Whisky
Whisky
made from only malted barley is generally called malt whisky rather than grain whisky. Most American and Canadian whiskies are grain whiskies. GRAIN WHISKY DEFINITIONUnder the regulations governing the production of both Irish and Scotch whisky, "malt whisky" must be produced from a mash of 100% malted barley, and must be distilled in a pot still . In Scotland, a whisky which either uses other malted or unmalted cereals in the mash (in addition to malted barley), and/or is distilled in a column still , is termed a "grain whisky"
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Pale Lager
PALE LAGER is a very pale-to-golden -coloured lager beer with a well attenuated body and a varying degree of noble hop bitterness. The brewing process for this beer developed in the mid-19th century when Gabriel Sedlmayr took pale ale brewing techniques back to the Spaten Brewery in Germany and applied them to existing lagering methods. This approach was picked up by other brewers, most notably Josef Groll of Bavaria
Bavaria
who produced Pilsner Urquell in the city of Pilsen in the Austro-Hungarian Empire
Austro-Hungarian Empire
(now in the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
). The resulting Pilsner beers – pale-coloured, lean and stable beers – were very successful and gradually spread around the globe to become the most common form of beer consumed in the world today
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Oatmeal Stout
STOUT is a dark beer made using roasted malt or roasted barley, hops , water and yeast. Stouts were traditionally the generic term for the strongest or stoutest porters , typically 7% or 8%, produced by a brewery . There are a number of variations including Baltic porter , milk stout , and imperial stout ; the most common variation is dry stout , exemplified by Guinness Draught
Guinness Draught
, the world's best selling stout. The first known use of the word stout for beer was in a document dated 1677 found in the Egerton Manuscript, the sense being that a stout beer was a strong beer not a dark beer. The name porter was first used in 1721 to describe a dark brown beer that had been made with roasted malts. Because of the huge popularity of porters, brewers made them in a variety of strengths
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Wheat
References: Serial No. 42236 ITIS 2002-09-22 WHEAT is a grass widely cultivated for its seed , a cereal grain which is a worldwide staple food . There are many species of wheat which together make up the genus _TRITICUM_; the most widely grown is common wheat (_T. aestivum_). The archaeological record suggests that wheat was first cultivated in the regions of the Fertile Crescent
Fertile Crescent
around 9600 BCE. Botanically, the wheat kernel is a type of fruit called a caryopsis . Wheat
Wheat
is grown on more land area than any other food crop (220.4 million hectares , 2014). World trade in wheat is greater than for all other crops combined. In 2016, world production of wheat was 749 million tonnes , making it the second most-produced cereal after maize . Since 1960, world production of wheat and other grain crops has tripled and is expected to grow further through the middle of the 21st century
21st century

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Maize
MAIZE (/ˈmeɪz/ _MAYZ_ ; _Zea mays_ subsp. _mays_, from Spanish : _maíz_ after Taíno _mahiz_), also known as CORN, is a large grain plant first domesticated by indigenous peoples in southern Mexico
Mexico
about 10,000 years ago. The leafy stalk of the plant produces separate pollen and ovuliferous inflorescences or ears , which are fruits, yielding kernels or seeds. Maize
Maize
has become a staple food in many parts of the world, with total production surpassing that of wheat or rice . However, not all of this maize is consumed directly by humans. Some of the maize production is used for corn ethanol , animal feed and other maize products , such as corn starch and corn syrup . The six major types of corn are dent corn , flint corn , pod corn , popcorn , flour corn , and sweet corn
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Wheat Beer
WHEAT BEER is a beer , usually top-fermented , which is brewed with a large proportion of wheat relative to the amount of malted barley . The two main varieties are Weissbier and Witbier ; minor types include Lambic , Berliner Weisse and Gose . CONTENTS* 1 Varieties * 1.1 Weizenbier * 1.2 Witbier * 1.3 Other varieties * 2 Names and types * 3 Serving * 4 Sensory profile * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links VARIETIESTwo common varieties of wheat beer are Weißbier (German – "white beer") based on the German tradition of mixing at least 50% wheat to barley malt to make a light coloured top-fermenting beer, and witbier (Dutch – "white beer") based on the Belgian tradition of using flavorings such as coriander and orange peel. Belgian white beers are often made with raw unmalted wheat, as opposed to the malted wheat used in other varieties
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Gelatinization
STARCH GELATINIZATION is a process of breaking down the intermolecular bonds of starch molecules in the presence of water and heat, allowing the hydrogen bonding sites (the hydroxyl hydrogen and oxygen) to engage more water. This irreversibly dissolves the starch granule in water. Water
Water
acts as a plasticizer . Three main processes happen to the starch granule: granule swelling, crystal or double helical melting, and amylose leaching. * During heating, water is first absorbed in the amorphous space of starch, which leads to a swelling phenomenon. * Water
Water
then enters via amorphous regions the tightly bound areas of double helical structures of amylopectin . At ambient temperatures these crystalline regions do not allow water to enter. Heat causes such regions to become diffuse, the amylose chains begin to dissolve, to separate into an amorphous form and the number and size of crystalline regions decreases
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Rice
RICE is the seed of the grass species _ Oryza sativa _ (Asian rice) or _ Oryza glaberrima _ (African rice). As a cereal grain , it is the most widely consumed staple food for a large part of the world's human population, especially in Asia. It is the agricultural commodity with the third-highest worldwide production (rice, 741.5 million tonnes in 2014), after sugarcane (1.9 billion tonnes) and maize (1.0 billion tonnes). _ Oryza sativa _ with small wind-pollinated flowers Since sizable portions of sugarcane and maize crops are used for purposes other than human consumption, rice is the most important grain with regard to human nutrition and caloric intake, providing more than one-fifth of the calories consumed worldwide by humans. There are many varieties of rice and culinary preferences tend to vary regionally. Cooked brown rice from Bhutan Rice can come in many shapes, colours and sizes
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Rye
_ Secale fragile_ M.Bieb. RYE (_ Secale cereale_) is a grass grown extensively as a grain , a cover crop and a forage crop. It is a member of the wheat tribe ( Triticeae ) and is closely related to barley (genus _Hordeum_) and wheat (_Triticum_). Rye grain is used for flour , rye bread , rye beer , crisp bread , some whiskeys , some vodkas , and animal fodder . It can also be eaten whole, either as boiled rye berries or by being rolled, similar to rolled oats . Rye is a cereal grain and should not be confused with ryegrass , which is used for lawns, pasture, and hay for livestock
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Steeping
STEEPING is the soaking in liquid (usually water) of a solid so as to extract flavours or to soften it. The specific process of teas being prepared for drinking by leaving the leaves in heated water to release the flavour and nutrients is known as steeping. Herbal teas may be prepared by decoction , infusion , or maceration . Some solids are soaked to remove an ingredient, such as salt from smoked ham or salted cod , where the solute is not the desired product. CONTENTS * 1 Corn * 2 Tea
Tea
* 3 Beer * 4 See also * 5 References CORNOne example is the steeping of corn (or maize ), part of the milling process. As described by the US Corn Refiners Association , harvested kernels of corn are cleaned and then steeped in water at a temperature of 50 °C (120 °F) for 30 to 40 hours. In the process their moisture content rises from 15% to 45% and their volume more than doubles. The gluten bonds in the corn are weakened and starch is released
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Starch
STARCH or AMYLUM is a polymeric carbohydrate consisting of a large number of glucose units joined by glycosidic bonds . This polysaccharide is produced by most green plants as an energy store. It is the most common carbohydrate in human diets and is contained in large amounts in staple foods such as potatoes , wheat , maize (corn), rice , and cassava . Pure starch is a white, tasteless and odorless powder that is insoluble in cold water or alcohol. It consists of two types of molecules: the linear and helical amylose and the branched amylopectin . Depending on the plant, starch generally contains 20 to 25% amylose and 75 to 80% amylopectin by weight. Glycogen , the glucose store of animals, is a more branched version of amylopectin. In industry, starch is converted into sugars, for example by malting , and fermented to produce ethanol in the manufacture of beer , whisky and biofuel . It is processed to produce many of the sugars used in processed foods
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Whisky
WHISKY or WHISKEY is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash . Various grains (which may be malted ) are used for different varieties, including barley , corn (maize) , rye , and wheat . Whisky
Whisky
is typically aged in wooden casks , generally made of charred white oak . Whisky
Whisky
is a strictly regulated spirit worldwide with many classes and types. The typical unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation, and aging in wooden barrels
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Barley
BARLEY (_ Hordeum vulgare_ L.), a member of the grass family , is a major cereal grain grown in temperate climates globally. It was one of the first cultivated grains, particularly in Eurasia as early as 10,000 years ago. Barley has been used as animal fodder , as a source of fermentable material for beer and certain distilled beverages , and as a component of various health foods . It is used in soups and stews, and in barley bread of various cultures. Barley grains are commonly made into malt in a traditional and ancient method of preparation. In 2014, barley was ranked fourth among grains in quantity produced (144 million tonnes ) behind corn, rice and wheat
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Sugar
SUGAR is the generic name for sweet, soluble carbohydrates , many of which are used in food. There are various types of sugar derived from different sources. Simple sugars are called monosaccharides and include glucose (also known as dextrose), fructose , and galactose . The "table sugar" or "granulated sugar" most customarily used as food is sucrose , a disaccharide of glucose and fructose. Sugar
Sugar
is used in prepared foods (e.g., cookies and cakes ) and it is added to some foods and beverages (e.g., coffee and tea ). In the body, sucrose is hydrolysed into the simple sugars fructose and glucose. Other disaccharides include maltose from malted grain, and lactose from milk . Longer chains of sugars are called oligosaccharides or polysaccharides . Some other chemical substances, such as glycerol may also have a sweet taste, but are not classified as sugars. Diet food substitutes for sugar , include aspartame and sucralose , a chlorinated derivative of sucrose
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