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Western Ukraine
Western Ukraine or the Ukrainian West (Ukrainian: Західна Україна, or Ukrainian: Захід України) is a geographical and historical relative term used in reference to the western territories of Ukraine. The form Ukrainian West is used but not emphasized often. The territory includes several historical regions such as Transcarpathia, Halychyna including Pokuttia, most of Volhynia, northern Bukovina as well as western Podolia. The main historical areas that the territory covers are Volhynia and Russia, today more known as Galicia or, locally, Halychyna. Russia in the Ukrainian West has nothing to do with the country to the east from Ukraine. The control over the territory the Muscovite Russia obtained only in the 20th century, particularly, during World War II when it was known as the Soviet Union and along with the Nazi Germany participated in another partitioning of Poland
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Moldavia
Moldavia (Romanian: Moldova, pronounced [molˈdova] (listen) or Țara Moldovei (in Romanian Latin alphabet), literally The Moldavian Country; in old Romanian Cyrillic alphabet: Цара Мѡлдовєй) is a historical region and former principality in Central and Eastern Europe, corresponding to the territory between the Eastern Carpathians and the Dniester River. An initially independent and later autonomous state, it existed from the 14th century to 1859, when it united with Wallachia (Țara Românească) as the basis of the modern Romanian state; at various times, Moldavia included the regions of Bessarabia (with the Budjak), all of Bukovina and Hertza
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Rivne
Rivne (/ˈrɪvnə/; Ukrainian: Рівне [ˈr⁽ʲ⁾iu̯ne]; Polish: Równe), also known as Rovno, is a historic city in western Ukraine. It is the administrative center of Rivne Oblast (province), as well as the surrounding Rivne Raion (district) within the oblast. Administratively, Rivne is incorporated as a city of oblast significance and does not belong to the raion. Population: 246,003 (2020 est.)[2] Between World War I and World War II, the city was located in Poland as a district-level (county) seat in Wolyn Voivodeship. At the start of the World War II in 1939, Rivne was occupied by the Soviet Red Army and received its current status by becoming a seat of regional government of Rivne Oblast which was created out of the eastern portion of the voivodeship. During the German occupation in 1941–44 the city was designated as a capital of the German Ukraine (Reichskommissariat Ukraine)
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Mukacheve
Mukachevo (Ukrainian: Мукачево, Rusyn: Мукачево, Hungarian: Munkács, Slovak: Mukačevo; see name section) is a city located in the valley of the Latorica river in Zakarpattia Oblast (province), in Western Ukraine. Serving as the administrative center of Mukachevo Raion (district), the city itself does not belong to the raion and is designated as a city of oblast significance, with the status equal to that of a separate raion. The city is now a rail terminus and highway junction, and has beer, wine, tobacco, food, textile, timber, and furniture industries
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Groschen
Groschen (pronunciation ; from Latin: grossus "thick", via Old Czech groš) was the (sometimes colloquial) name for a silver coin used in various states of the Holy Roman Empire. The name was introduced in 13th-century France as [denarius] grossus, lit. "thick penny", whence Old French gros, Italian grosso, Middle High German gros(se), Low German and Dutch grōte and English groat
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Khotyn
Khotyn (Ukrainian: Хотин, pronounced [xoˈtɪn]; Romanian: Hotin; see other names) is a city in Chernivtsi Oblast of western Ukraine, and is the administrative center of Khotyn Raion within the oblast, and is located south-west of Kamianets-Podilskyi. According to the 2001 Ukrainian census, it has a population of 11,124. Current population: 9,132 (2020 est.)[1] Khotyn, first chronicled in 1001,[2] is located on the right (southwestern) bank of the Dniester River, and is part of the historical region Bessarabia
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General Government Of Galicia And Bukovina
The General Government of Galicia and Bukovina (Russian: Галицийское генерал-губернаторство) was a temporary Imperial Russian military administration of eastern parts of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria captured from Austria-Hungary during World War I. The administration was established after the Russian victory in the Battle of Galicia, led by the commander-in-chief Nikolay Iudovich Ivanov in the late summer of 1914. It did not last long and by mid-1915 Russians retreated, following the Gorlice–Tarnów Offensive led by the Central Powers overall commander August von Mackensen
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Crown Of Poland

The Crown of the Kingdom of Poland (Polish: Korona Królestwa Polskiego; Latin: Corona Regni Poloniae), known as the Polish Crown, or the Crown, is the common name for the historic Late Middle Ages territorial possessions of the King of Poland, including the Kingdom of Poland proper. The Polish Crown was at the helm of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569 to 1795.

Banner of the Kingdom of Poland until the 15th century
The Kingdom of Poland has been traditionally dated back to c. 966, when Mieszko I and his pagan Slavic realm joined Christian Europe (Baptism of Poland), establishing the state of Poland, a process started by his Polan Piast dynasty ancestors
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Casimir The Great
Casimir III the Great (Polish: Kazimierz III Wielki; 30 April 1310 – 5 November 1370) reigned as the King of Poland and Russia from 1333 to 1370. He was the third[1] son of Władysław I the Elbow-high and Jadwiga of Kalisz, and the last Polish king from the Piast dynasty.[2] Casimir inherited a kingdom weakened by war and made it prosperous and wealthy. He reformed the Polish army and doubled the size of the kingdom. He reformed the judicial system and introduced a legal code, gaining the title "the Polish Justinian".[3] Casimir built extensively and founded the University of Kraków,[4] the oldest Polish university
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Bolesław-Jerzy II
Yuri II Boleslav (1305/1310 – April 7, 1340), also known as Bolesław-Jerzy II, was a ruler of the Polish Piast dynasty who ruled the originally Ruthenian principality of Galicia. After his death started the Galicia–Volhynia Wars over the succession of Galicia and Volhynia. Bolesław was born between 1305 and 1310[1] to Trojden I of Masovia from the Piast dynasty, Duke of Czersk and Maria, daughter of Yuri I, prince of Galicia. Since his father was still a ruler of the family's Masovian lands, in 1323 Bolesław, renamed Jerzy, became Prince of Galicia. He also received the Duchy of Belz after the childless death of Andrew of Galicia. In 1331, he married the daughter of Grand Duke of Lithuania Gediminas and sister of Aldona of Lithuania, wife of Casimir III of Poland. The name of Bolesław's wife is disputed. T
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Dragoș, Voivode Of Moldavia
Dragoș, also known as Dragoș Vodă, or Dragoș the Founder[1] was the first Voivode of Moldavia, who reigned in the middle of the 14th century, according to the earliest Moldavian chronicles. The same sources say that Dragoș came from Maramureş while chasing an aurochs or bison across the Carpathian Mountains. His descălecat, or "dismounting", on the banks of the Moldova River has traditionally been regarded as the symbol of the foundation of the Principality of Moldavia in Romanian historiography. Most details of his life are uncertain. Historians have identified him either with Dragoș of Bedeu or with Dragoș of Giulești, who were Vlach, or Romanian, landowners in the Kingdom of Hungary. Most Moldavian chronicles write that Dragoș came to Moldavia in 1359, but modern historians tend to propose an earlier date (1345, 1347, and 1352)
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Partitions Of Poland
The Partitions of Poland[a] were three partitions of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth that took place toward the end of the 18th century and ended the existence of the state, resulting in the elimination of sovereign Poland and Lithuania for 123 years. The partitions were conducted by the Habsburg Monarchy, the Kingdom of Prussia, and the Russian Empire, which divided up the Commonwealth lands among themselves progressively in the process of territorial seizures and annexations.[1][2][3][4] The First Partition of Poland was decided on August 5, 1772. Two decades later, Russian and Prussian troops entered the Commonwealth again and the Second Partition was signed on January 23, 1793. Austria did not participate in the Second Partition. The Third Partition of Poland took place on October 24, 1795, in reaction to the unsuccessful Polish Kościuszko Uprising the previous year
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